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Full text of "Indiana Vocational Technical College, Central Indiana Region Bulletin, 1988-1989"

Indiana Vocational 
Technical College 



IVY1ECH 




Central Indiana Region 



Bulletin/1988-89 



College Calendar 



Fall 1988 

August 22-September 2/Registration 

September 5/Labor Day 

September 6/ Classes Begin 

November 2/Classes End 

Winter 1988 

November 17-23/Registration 

Thanksgiving Break/November 24-25 

November 28/Classes Begin 

Holiday Break/December 22- January 4, 1989 

February 24/Classes End 

Spring 1989 

February 27-March 2/Registration 

March 6/Classes Begin 

May 19/Classes End 



Indiana Vocational 
Technical College 



Indiana's Technical College 




IVYIECH 

=T Indiana's Technical College 



One West 26th Street 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46208 
(317)921-4800 



The education programs, courses, description and frequency of courses, regulations, and fees shown 
in this bulletin are effective Fall Quarter 1988. This publication and its provisions are not in any 
way a contract between the student and Indiana Vocational Technical College. The college reserves 
the right to revise any section or requirement at any time. 

Indiana Vocational Technical College at Indianapolis is an Accredited, Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action State College. 
An Ivy Tech-Region 8 Publication 



How to get here from there! 



US 421 



US 31 US 431 



1-65 



1-74 




North Meridian Center 
One West 26th Street 
(Comer of Fall Creek Parkway 
and North Meridian) 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46206 

(317)921-4800 



East Washington Street Center 
1315 E. Washington Street 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 



A Message from the 
Vice-President/Dean 

The purpose of this bulletin, along with a variety of separate program brochures, is to de- 
scribe the programs and services offered at Indiana Vocational Technical College — Central Indiana. 




Indiana Vocational Technical College — Central Indiana operates two permanent campus 
facilities: The North Meridian Center at Fall Creek and Meridian and the East Washington Street 
Center at Washington Street and Oriental. The College also offers various courses at sites in each of 
the counties in the Indianapolis Metropolitan Area. 

As you enter our classes, you will encounter a truly outstanding faculty and staff, noted not 
only for their expertise in the subjects they are teaching but for their personal interest in the students' 
success. Our intent is to assist in making your educational experience a highly successful one. 

Many of you will come to our campus to take one or two courses for personal and profes- 
sional enrichment. That's why we are here. Others might be preparing for careers by attending our 
one-and two-year collegiate technical and associate degree programs. That, too, is why we are here. 

Indiana Vocational Technical College is the third largest state college in Indiana and has the 
reputation for offering high quality educational services at a reasonable cost. 

On behalf of the Board of Trustees and the entire staff, I welcome you to Indiana Vocational 
Technical College and invite you to join our campus community. 



Dr. Meredith L. Carter 

Vice-President/Dean 

Ivy Tech — Central Indiana 



Table of Contents 



The College 

Accreditation 1 

Facilities 1 

General Information 3 

Offices and Services 3 

Placement 4 

Registrar's Office 3 

Parking 4 

Personal Messages 4 

Lost and Found 4 

Child Care 4 

Financial Assistance 5 

General Admissions 5 

Transfer Students 5 

Admissions 7 

Transfer of Credit 7 

International Students 7 

Handicapped Students 7 

Orientation Program 8 

Student Services 8 

Assessment Testing/Services 8 

Testout Procedures 8 

Credit For Work Experience 8 

Registration 9 

Withdrawal Procedures 9 

Fees 9 

Veterans' Information 9 

Refund Policy 10 

Grading System 11 

Graduation 14 

Placement Office 15 

Student Conduct 15 

Violations 16 

Student Grievance 17 

Division of Instructional Support Services 18 

Instructional Programs 

Division of Applied Science and Technologies 

Applied Fire Science Technology 20 

Architectural Drafting Technology 21 

Automated Manufacturing Technology 22 

Automotive Body Repair Technology 23 

Automotive Service Technology 24 

Electronics Technology 25 

Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration 

Technology 26 

Industrial Drafting Technology 27 

Industrial Laboratory Technology 28 

Industrial Maintenance Technology 29 

Machine Tool Technology 30 

Pollution Treatment Technology 31 

Welding Technology 32 



Division of Business, Office and Information 
Systems Technologies 

Accounting Technology 34 

Business and Management Technology 35 

Computer Information Systems Technology . 36 

Culinary Arts Technology 37 

Distribution Management Technology 38 

Hotel/Restaurant Management Technology . . 39 
Information/Data Management Technology . 40 

Paralegal Technology 41 

Quality Control Technology 42 

Secretarial Sciences/Word Processing 43 

Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 

Child Care Technology 46 

Health Care Administration 47 

Human Services 48 

Medical Assistant 50 

Practical Nursing 51 

Radiologic Technology 52 

Respiratory Care Practitioner 53 

Surgical Technology 54 

Proposed Programs for 1988 

Associate Degree Nursing 56 

Commercial Art Technology 57 

Interior Design Technology 58 

Medical Records Technology 59 

Real Estate Management 60 

Course Descriptions 61 

Program Locator Chart 87 

Full-Time Faculty 88 

Trustees and Officers of College 92 

Administration 92 

Map 93 



Ivy Tech- 
Indiana's Technical College 

Indiana Vocational Technical College, popularly 
known as Ivy Tech, has grown from an idea to a thriving 
post-secondary institution. In 1963, the Indiana General 
Assembly established Ivy Tech as Indiana's first state- 
wide vocational technical college. Later amendments to 
the enabling legislation authorized Ivy Tech's present 
regional structure of thirteen administrative centers 
designed to provide accessible technical education 
opportunities. 

The mission of Ivy Tech is stated in the authoriz- 
ing legislation: "There shall be, and hereby is created and 
established, a new state post-high school educational 
institution to be devoted primarily to occupational 
training of a practical, technical, and semi-technical 
nature for the citizens of Indiana." 

Across the state, some 25,000 students are 
enrolled each fall quarter in programs offered in the 
following instructional divisions: Business, Office and 
Information Systems Technologies; Visual Communica- 
tions Technologies; Human Services and Health Tech- 
nologies; and Applied Science and Technologies. 

Ivy Tech's rapid growth and educational 
achievements can be attributed to its firm adherence to its 
mission and goals and to the strong support and encour- 
agement from the state and community leaders. 

Regional History 

Ivy Tech-Central Indiana at Indianapolis, one of 
the College's 13 regions, opened its doors in 1966 to 
serve residents of Indianapolis and Marion, Morgan, 
Hancock, Johnson, Shelby, Boone, Hendricks, and 
Hamilton Counties. In 1966, 367 students enrolled in 
three technical programs; in 1987, 4,760 students 
enrolled in 33 areas of study. Further, state leaders in 
government and business are looking to Ivy Tech more 
than ever before to provide the skilled technicians that 
will attract new industry to the state. 

Administration 

Statewide, Ivy Tech is governed by an 1 1 
member Board of Trustees appointed by the Governor. 
Under terms of the legislature, the trustees represent 
various economic interests- manufacturing, commerce, 
labor, agriculture, and the public-at-large. This board 
appoints the President of the College 

In addition, each of the College's 13 regions, 
including Ivy Tech Central Indiana, has its own Regional 
Board of Trustees appointed by the State Board. The 
Regional Board members keep Ivy Tech in touch with 
local needs — both the needs of those seeking skills and 
the needs of industry. 



Philosophy 

All individuals, regardless of economic and 
social status, are entitled to be treated with dignity and 
respect and should be provided with opportunities to 
develop to their and society's ultimate benefit. Technical 
and general education are essential parts of an occupa- 
tional curriculum designed to enable students to develop 
self-awareness and social responsibility to compete 
successfully in a chosen occupational field. Programming 
at Ivy Tech is directed toward serving the needs of all 
individuals within their community, as well as the needs 
of the community as a whole. 

Accreditation 

Ivy Tech is accredited by: 

• Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the 
North Central Association of Colleges and Schools 

• Indiana Commission for Vocational Technical Educa- 
tion 

• Committee on Allied Health Education and Accredita- 
tion. 

Ivy Tech' s Division of Human Service and 
Health Technologies is separately accredited by the 
following agencies: 

• American Association of Medical Assistants 

• Association of Surgical Technologies, Inc. 

• Indiana State Board of Nursing 

• National League of Nursing 

• Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic 
Technology 

• Joint Review Committee of Respiratory Therapy 
Education 

• Indiana State Board of Health 

• Indiana Counselors Association on Alcohol and Drug 
Abuse (ICAADA) 

• Indiana State Board of Registration and Education for 
Health Facility Administrators. 

The College is also a member of the Indiana 
Conference for Higher Education, the American Associa- 
tion of Community and Junior Colleges, the Indiana 
Student Financial Aid Association, American Association 
of College Registrars and Admissions Officers, Associa- 
tion of Community College Trustees, Chef de Cuisine 
Association of Indiana, American Culinary Federation, 
Inc., American Institute of Design and Drafting, and 
National Association of College and University Business 
Officers. 

The College is approved for the education of 
veterans, veterans' spouses, widow/ers, children, and/or 
orphans of disabled or deceased veterans who are eligible 
for educational benefits. The college is also endorsed by 
the Rehabilitation Division of the State of Indiana. 

Facilities 

The Ivy Tech-Central Indiana campus is com- 
prised of three sites located east and north of downtown 



Indianapolis. The region's Division of Business, Office 
and Information Systems Technologies, the Division of 
Human Services and Health Technologies and support 
services of the College share facilities with the College's 
statewide administration at the North Meridian Center, 
One West 26th Street (northwest comer of Meridian at 
Fall Creek Parkway). The Division of Applied Science 
and Technologies programs and various support services 
are located at the East Washington Street Center, 1315 E. 
Washington. The Extended Services office is housed at 
North Meridian Center, as well as in communities near In- 
dianapolis. Many students enjoy the convenience of Ivy 
Tech's classes, offered in locations not more than 10 
miles from their homes. The schedule of classes pub- 
lished each quarter lists the days, times and locations of 
Ivy Tech course offerings. 



Office of Industrial Training and Development 

Ivy Tech provides a variety of training 
programs through courses , seminars, and workshops 
requested by business and industry. In addition to regular 
credit courses, special training programs and business 
seminars unique to a company's needs are developed and 
presented by qualified Ivy Tech personnel. Employers 
seeking specific training for their employees may request 
a training program tailored to their needs, or they may 
enroll their employees in Ivy Tech's regular courses or 
programs. 



Wide Variety of Programs, Training Offered 

Ivy Tech provides a wide variety of programs 
and credit courses in the Indianapolis facilities listed 
above and in 13 centers strategically located in the 
surrounding counties. Students may pursue their program 
objectives either full-time or part-time as their various life 
situations may require. The academic year is divided into 
four, 1 1 week quarters with breaks between quarters for 
counseling and registration. 

The Associate Degree is awarded to students 
who have completed satisfactorily the required number of 
credits in an approved program and who are high school 
graduates or the equivalent. Associate degree programs 
are designed to prepare students for employment as 
qualified technical persons. 

The Technical Certificate is awarded to students 
who have completed between 45-60 quarter credits in an 
approved program and who have satisfactorily completed 
all program course work. Technical Certificate programs 
are designed to provide students with skills for specific 
job classifications. 

Ivy Tech-Central Indiana degree and certification 
programs are offered through three divisions of the 
College-Applied Science and Technologies; Human 
Services and Health Technologies; and Business, 
Office and Information Systems Technologies. 

The General Education content of all programs is 
designed to enhance the student's ability to practice 
general citizenship and social responsibility in addition to 
complementing specific job requirements. 

In response to the needs of Region 8 residents, 
Ivy Tech provides credit and non-credit training at a 
number of off-campus sites, such as hospitals, businesses, 
industries, high schools and agencies. Currently, more 
than 40 regular credit courses are being offered through a 
dual enrollment arrangement between the Adult Voca- 
tional programs and Ivy Tech at four sites in Central 
Indiana. 



General Information 



Offices and Services 

The following offices and services are available 
to assist students in successful completion of their courses 
of study at Ivy Tech. 



A.C.C£.S.S.: (Academic and Career Competence 
Through Educational Support Systems) Provides assis- 
tance to students who need additional academic help to 
succeed, beyond the services of Ivy Tech programs. 
Administered through the Developmental and General 
Education Department. The program also includes 
specialized testing, tutoring and counseling. 
Phone Number: 921-4925. 



Information Center. Provides general information and 
program brochures. 
Phone Number: 921-4800 

Hours: Monday -Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.; Friday, 
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Hours may vary with Registration. Please call Admis- 
sions at 921-4800. 

Counseling Center. Provides counseling for admission 
and academic career planning. Also provides information 
on registration, programs, orientation, and testing. 
Phone Number: 921-4800 

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.; Friday, 
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Hours may vary with Registration. Please call Admis- 
sions at 921-4800. 



Registrar's Office: Processes and maintains grade 
information, drop/adds, registration forms, student 
records, transcripts, and certification of graduation. 
Phone Number: 921-4977. 

Math Lab: Math Lab personnel work with students 

enrolled in Tech Math 1, Business Math and Math of 

Finance. 

Phone Number: 9214925(North Meridian Center); 269- 

9221 (East Washington Street Center). 

Special Needs Supportive Services: Assists hearing 
impaired individuals in vocational, technical, and devel- 
opmental studies. Assistance includes an instructor, and 
interpreters for the hearing impaired. 
Phone Number: 921-4983 (TTY/VOICE) 



Veterans Affairs: Provides general information regarding 
veterans' programs, educational benefits, certification, 
V.A. Work/Study, tutoring possibilities, and fee remis- 
sion. 
Phone Number: 9214700 or 921-4742. 



Center for Single ParentlHomemaker Educational 

Services: Provides counseling, testing, and other services, 

such as workshops, and seminars, for single parents and 

homemakers. 

Phone Number: 251-0041 or 921-4796 



Financial Assistance: Provides general information and 

counseling regarding the application for and award of 

college work/study, grants, scholarships, loans, and Pell 

Grants. 

Phone Number: 9214777 



Computer Assisted Instructional Lab: Provides educa- 
tional software tailored to adult learners and to enhance 
faculty awareness by incorporating software into their 
educational process. 
Phone Number: 9214972 



Bursar's Office: Receives payment for fees and tran- 
scripts. Disburses checks for V.A, grants, loans, and 
refunds. 

Phone Number: 9214944 

Hours:Monday-Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.(non- 
registration hours); 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. during 
registration hours; Friday, 10 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Developmental Studies: Provides individualized courses 
in the areas of reading, English and mathematics to help 
the student increase basic skills in mathematics, reading, 
spelling ability and writing skills. Students who have not 
earned a high school diploma may prepare for and take 
the GED examination. 



Bookstore: The Ivy Tech Bookstore, at North Meridian 
Center and East Washington Center, sells required 
textbooks and supplies, gifts and other materials. Regular 
bookstore hours are Monday through Thursday, 9:00 a.m. 
to 6:00 p.m. and Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. During the 
first week of registration, the hours are Monday -Thurs- 
day, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.; during the second week, 9:00 
a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Friday hours remain the same. 
Phone Numbers: 9214782 (North Meridian Center); 269- 
9229 (East Washington Street Center). 



LibrarylLRC: The Library/Learning Resource Center is a 
source of reference materials, leisure reading materials, 
materials related to all program areas of the College, 
career exploration materials, general magazines and 
newspapers, audio visual materials and equipment, 
interlibrary loans, textbooks on reserve for in-library use, 
reference service, library use assistance and pay photo- 
copy machine. 

Job Placement 

The College Placement Office maintains records 
for all students interested in job placement assistance and 
prospective employers seeking qualified graduates of Ivy 
Tech's programs. Employers registering with the Office 
are provided with the names of all qualified candidates for 
employment without regard to sex, race, age, national 
origin, or non-disqualifying handicaps. 

Students registered with the Placement Office 
have access to information on employment opportunities, 
assistance in preparing a credential packet, and assistance 
in obtaining copies of credentials to be released to 
prospective employers. Any students registered with the 
office can be interviewed by all prospective employers. 
Phone Number: 921^880. 



Parking 

The College provides parking lots for students, 
visitors, faculty, and staff. Parking is on a first-come, 
first-served basis; maps and copies of parking rules are 
available through Security and General Information. 

Personal Messages 

The College cannot accept or deliver personal 
messages or telephone calls for students except in cases of 
extreme emergency. The College must know the extent 
of the emergency before attempting to locate the student. 

Lost and Found 

Lost and found items should be turned in and/or 
claimed in the Security Office. 

Phone Number: 921-4806 (North Meridian Center); 269- 
9251 (East Washington Street Center). 

Child Care 

Ivy Tech provides child care facilities for 
children of students, faculty and staff. For more informa- 
tion call 921-4300. 




Sharon's academic and vocational 
preparation at Ivy Tech brought us 
the type of mature employee 
that most benefits our structure and 
service. We have encouraged 
several of our current employees to 
take classes to increase both their 
skills and productivity. We are 
grateful for the availability of 
vcoational training and the place- 
ment office which helped us in 
meeting our needs. 

P. Diane Jackson 

Light of the World Christian Church 



Financial Assistance 



The following is general financial assistance 
information at Ivy Tech — Central Indiana. 

If you have any questions regarding Financial 
Assistance call 921-4777 or visit the Office of Financial 
Assistance at North Meridian Center, One West 26th 
Street (Meridian at Fall Creek). 

General Information 

Indiana Vocational Technical College offers 
various types of financial assistance to students who want 
to continue their education. Some assistance programs 
are administered by the College Office of Financial 
Assistance under the policies and guidelines established 
by the State and Federal Government Other programs are 
administered directly by a state or federal agency or an 
outside organization. Eligibility for most financial 
assistance at Ivy Tech is based upon the student's 
demonstrated financial need. Ivy Tech offers eight major 
student financial assistance programs: Pell Grants, 
Supplemental Education Opportunity Grants (SEOG), 
College Work-Study (CW-S), Higher Education Awards 
(HEA), Lilly Educational Endowment Awards (LEEA), 
Guaranteed Student Loans (GSL), Supplemental Loan for 
Students (SLS) or Parent Loan for Undergraduate 
Students (PLUS), and Ivy Tech Grants and Scholarships. 

Eligibility 

In general, you may be eligible for financial 
assistance if: 

• you have been accepted for admission to the College in 
an eligible program on at least a half-time basis. 

• you are a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen. 

• you have filed an Ivy Tech application for financial 
assistance which includes draft compliance and educa- 
tional purpose statements. 

• you are making satisfactory progress toward completing 
your course of study. 

• you have submitted requested documentation to verify 
the data provided on the Financial Aid Form (FAF) or the 
Application for Federal Student Aid (AFSA). 

• you have indicated acceptance of any awards by signing 
the Financial Aid Notification within deadlines specified 
by the Office of Financial Assistance. 

• you do not owe a refund on a Pell Grant or a Supple- 
mental Educational Opportunity Grant 

• you are not in default on a Perkins Loan (formerly 
National Direct Student Loan) or Guaranteed Student 
Loan, or Supplemental Loan for Students. 

Application Forms 

Applications are available in the Office of 
Financial Assistance. Fall Quarter marks the beginning of 



the financial assistance award year. You may apply by 
filling out either of these forms: The College Scholarship 
Service Financial Aid Form (FAF) or the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Education's Application for Federal Student Aid 
(AFSA). You are strongly urged to let the financial 
assistance staff review your application before it is 
mailed. This will reduce your chances of making an error 
which could delay your financial assistance. 

Student Aid Report (SAR) 

If you apply for federal student assistance, four 
to six weeks later you will receive a Student Aid Report 
(SAR). The SAR reproduces the information you gave on 
your application. 

Based on that information, the SAR shows 
whether you are eligible for a Pell Grant If you are 
eligible, the Office of Financial Assistance at Ivy Tech 
will use the Student Aid Index number on your SAR to 
determine the amount of your Pell Grant. Even if you are 
ineligible for Pell Grant, check with the Office of Finan- 
cial Assistance. The Office of Financial Assistance may 
be able to refer you to other forms of financial assistance. 

Verification 

Verification is a procedure whereby a school 
verifies certain items reported on the SAR. Ivy Tech 
currently verifies at least 30 percent of the SAR's 
submitted. 

To complete the verification procedure, you must 
provide the following documents: 

° A signed copy of your and /or your parents' 
most recent Federal Tax Return (1040, 1040A, 1040EZ). 

° A Verification Worksheet. 

If a SAR is found to have incorrect information, 
the Office of Financial Assistance will return the SAR to 
you with the corrections marked. You must then send it 
into the Pell Grant Processing Center. The Pell Grant 
Processing Center will in turn send you a corrected SAR. 

If you received federal financial aid because you 
reported incorrect information, you will have to repay any 
portion of assistance you should not have received. Also, 
ANY PERSON WHO INTENTIONALLY MAKES 
FALSE STATEMENTS OR MISREPRESENTATIONS 
ON A FEDERAL AID APPLICATION IS VIOLATING 
THE LAW AND IS SUBJECT TO FUME OR IMPRIS- 
ONMENT OR BOTH, UNDER PROVISIONS OF THE 
U.S. CRIMINAL CODE. 

Transfer Student 

If you transfer from one school to another, your 
financial assistance does not automatically go with you. 
To continue receiving assistance at Ivy Tech, you must 
check with the Office of Financial Assistance at Ivy Tech 
to find out what programs are available and what steps 
you must take. If you are attending or have attended 
another college and decide to transfer to Ivy Tech, you 
must have your prior school send a Financial Aid Tran- 



script to Ivy Tech. If the Ivy Tech Office of Financial 
Assistance does not receive this transcript , you will not 
receive assistance from any financial assistance programs. 

If you have a Pell Grant, you must get an official 
duplicate of your Student Aid Report to submit to Ivy 
Tech's Office of Financial Assistance. If you have a 
Guaranteed Student Loan, check with the lender to be 
sure you can continue your loan at Ivy Tech. 

If you have a Supplemental Educational Oppor- 
tunity Grant, or a College Work-Study job, check with the 
Office of Financial Assistance at Ivy Tech to find out if 
funds from these programs are available. 

Student Responsibilities 

It is your responsibility to: 

• Review and consider all information about a school's 
program before you enroll. 

• Pay special attention to your application for student 
financial assistance, complete it accurately, and submit it 
on time to the Office of Financial Assistance. Errors can 
delay your receiving assistance. 

• Provide all additional documentation, verification, 
corrections, and/or new information requested by either 
the Office of Financial Assistance or the agency to which 
you submitted your application. 

• Read and understand all forms that you are asked to 
sign and keep copies of them. 

• If you have a loan, notify the lender of changes in your 
name, address, or school status. 

• Perform in a satisfactory manner the work that is agreed 
upon in accepting College Work-Study job. 

• Know and comply with the school's refund procedures. 

Course of Study 

A student is expected to complete a chosen 
course of study at Ivy Tech within the designated maxi- 
mum time frame. Pursuing a course of study is to enroll 
and attend classes within a program and work toward the 
Associate in Applied Science degree or Technical 
Certificate. 



Appeal Procedures 

Students whose financial assistance benefits are 
suspended have the right to appeal the decision. The 
Appeals Committee includes Ivy Tech employees who do 
not work in the Office of Financial Assistance. 

To file an appeal, students should pick up a 
blank appeals form in the Office of Financial Assistance, 
complete the form as indicated and return the form to the 
Office of Financial Assistance. The decision of the 
committee will be mailed to the student. 

Refunds to Financial Assistance Recipients 

Except for GSL, no financial assistance funds 
will be released to the student until after the refund 
period. The amount of any awards which are affected by 
changes in enrollment status during the refund period will 
be adjusted accordingly. For GSL recipients, a portion of 
the refund may be returned to the lender. 



Standards of Progress 

To continue to receive financial assistance, a 
student must be enrolled in a sufficient number of hours 
to be eligible. All students must maintain the College 
approved Standards of Progress. The Office of Financial 
Assistance will monitor, quarterly, each student 
recipient's grade point average (GPA) and the number of 
credit hours completed. A student is expected to com- 
plete an Associate Degree or Technical Certificate within 
a reasonable time frame. 

If there are questions regarding probationary 
enrollment or the suspension of financial assistance, a 
student should contact the Office of Financial Assistance 
for information about appeal and/or reinstatements 
procedure. 



Admissions 



Indiana Vocational Technical College will seek 
to develop degree credit programs, courses, and commu- 
nity service offerings and provide for open admission 
counseling and placement service for all individuals 
regardless of race, color, creed, religion, sex, national 
origin, physical or mental handicap, age or veteran's 
status. Furthermore, the College will intensify its concern 
and elevate its professional competence to the elimination 
of the conditions from which discrimination springs. 

General Admissions (Non-Degree Objective) 

Ivy Tech offers courses in many special interest 
areas, including college preparation. For those who plan 
to take the GED test, the College offers GED preparation. 
Persons interested in taking any of the numerous Ivy Tech 
courses are invited to do so. Admission as a non-degree 
student is quick and easy and can be accomplished as part 
of the registration process. 

General Admissions 
(Degree Objective) 

For admission as a regular student in one of Ivy 
Tech's programs leading to an Associate of Science, 
Associate in Applied Science degree or Technical 
Certificate each student must submit a graduate high 
school grade transcript or a copy of successfully com- 
pleted GED scores. This must be done in the first quarter 
of admission to a program. 

Applicants will participate in assessment testing. 
* The purposes of the testing are to measure the student's 
ability to benefit from a selected program and to deter- 
mine the appropriate placement in Ivy Tech courses. 
Admission standards will be satisfied if the assessment 
testing reveals that the applicant has the basic skills 
needed for success n the chosen program. If the tests 
reveal skill deficiencies, appropriate developmental 
course work will be provided. 

The College will guide the enrollment of 
students in particular programs, or courses, on the basis of 
prior academic records, vocational counseling and testing. 

Testing may be waived if the applicant submits 
either: 

a. an official transcript from an accredited post- 
secondary institution indicating achievement consistent 
with Ivy Tech's admission standards; 

b. acceptable standardized test scores (i.e., 
SAT.ACT). 

Limited Admission and Enrollment 

The number of students admitted and enrolled in 
programs and/or courses may be limited by one or more 
of the following factors: 

1. College financial resources; 



2. facilities, including available lab equipment 
and related support; 

3. the number of available health program 
clinical workstations. 

Some programs have pre-requisites or entrance 
requirements based on skill levels and prior knowledge. 
Selected programs may require a completed health 
examination form signed by a medical doctor. 

Transfer Students 

Students admitted from other recognized 
colleges and universities may be awarded credit at Ivy 
Tech for completed courses that apply to the chosen 
program of study. These students may present an official 
transcript from the institution previously attended and 
have proven they have met general admission require- 
ments. The College reserves the right to refuse admis- 
sion, or to accept conditionally, those students who have 
been dismissed for disciplinary reasons form other 
colleges or universities, including other regions of Ivy 
Tech. 

Transfer of Credits 

Ivy Tech programs are complete in themselves. 
Some students do transfer credit successfully. However, it 
is the right and responsibility of the receiving institution 
to decide whether or not to accept credits from Ivy Tech 
or any other institution. If a student plans to transfer, he/ 
she may wish to check with the other institution before 
enrolling at Ivy Tech to get specific information about 
that institution's policies on credit transfer. 

International Students 

Ivy Tech admits qualified students from other 
countries. International students must meet College 
admission requirements and specific International 
admission procedures. 

For more information on admission of interna- 
tional students please contact the International Student 
Advisor in the Office of Admissions. 

Handicapped Students 

College programs and facilities are accessible to 
students with physical handicaps. Designated parking and 
special restroom facilities are available. Support services 
are also available to aid handicapped students with career 
planning, financial aid, personal counseling and place- 
ment The College staff works with the Department of 
Vocational Rehabilitation and other service agencies to 
assist physically and psychologically impaired students 
through available local community resources. 

Students with handicaps are urged to contact the 
Office of Student Services at 921-4800 for help with then- 
special problems as students at Ivy Tech. 



Orientation Program 

All new students are encouraged to participate in 
an orientation program prior to or during the first quarter 
of classes. The purpose of the orientation is to assist 
students in making the transition to the College environ- 
ment. Topics include student services, financial aid, 
business services, instructional programs, College 
activities, and College policies and procedures. The 
orientation program may also include, if not yet com- 
pleted, testing, interviews, evaluation, counseling, 
program advising, determination of advanced standing 
status, and scheduling of classes. 

The Office of Student Services offers counseling 
to all interested students. Students may obtain individual 
counseling and/or assessment to assist them in identifying 
their abilities or occupational interests or in developing 
realistic education or career plans from occupational 
outlook data. Students wishing assistance in selecting an 
occupation and the necessary training may contact 
Admissions at 921-4800. 

Academic Advising 

A faculty advisory system complements the 
counseling program provided by the Office of Student 
Services. Each student, on admission to the College, is 
assigned a faculty advisor whose purpose is: 

1. to assist the student in course selection and 
program planning. 

2. to guide the student in meeting the require- 
ments for graduation as prescribed by the College. 

3. to ensure that appropriate technical and 
general education electives are included in the chosen 
course of study. 

The College encourages close cooperation 
among students, faculty, and staff. Some counseling is 
available on an unscheduled basis; however, students are 
encouraged to schedule appointments with counselors in 
advance at the Office of Student Services. 

Assessment Testing/Services 

All students should attend an assessment session 
before being admitted into a program. These assessments 
are used to assist in determining program and course 
choices of maximum benefit to the student. Ivy Tech 
offers a variety of assessments to assist students with 
career planning and program placement. Students can 
also receive help in career selection through counseling 
and testing. Career testing is used only for student 
guidance, not for admission selection. Adults who have 
been out of school for some time are encouraged to 
complete the Testing program to assist them in determin- 
ing their career goals and planning their courses of study. 
A fee may be charged to cover the cost of administering 
some of the tests and assessments. Students with previous 



college credits should submit an official college tran- 
script, which may be used in lieu of testing. 

Alternative Methods of Earning Transfer of Credit 

Most Ivy Tech students earn credit at 
the College by officially enrolling in and acquiring the 
competence identified for each course. There are other 
ways of earning Ivy Tech credit, however. Some students 
have attended other colleges or universities and request a 
transfer of credit. Credit transfer is accomplished when 
the student arranges with his/her former institution to send 
an official transcript to the Registrar's office at Ivy Tech. 
This transcript is evaluated for all courses relevant to the 
student's chosen field. A student must have earned a C or 
better in any course he/she wishes to transfer to Ivy Tech. 
The course must also be from an institution that is 
accredited by one of the five major accrediting bodies in 
the United States. There is no overall expiration deadline 
for courses to be transferred; however, each program 
chairperson/evaluator uses his/her judgment as to the 
recency of a course's knowledge and skills. Official 
transcripts need to be submitted for evaluation to the 
Registrar's Office no later than the first quarter of 
enrollment. 

Test-out Procedures 

The policy regarding testing out of classes varies 
from program to program; therefore, a student wishing to 
test-out of a class should contact the program advisor 
before registering for the class. 
A fee will be charged for test outs. 

The general guidelines for test-out are as 
follows: 

1. Test-out examination should be taken before 
registration for the class for which the test-out is at- 
tempted. 

2. Test-out examination should be taken and 
completed at one sitting (unless the test is offered in two 
parts, i.e., lab and written exams). 

3. Test- out examinations for specific courses 
may be attempted only once. 

4. Test-out credits may not be included in credit 
computations for a financial assistance program. 

Credit for Work Experience 

Students who believe that occupational experi- 
ence has enabled them to acquire the proficiencies and 
competence to meet the objectives of a particular college 
course, or several courses, may request an evaluation of 
this work experience for advanced standing. Credit for 
work experience is awarded only for well-documented, 
measurable evidence of accomplishment. Students 
seeking to acquire credit for work experience should be 
prepared to submit evidence such as a portfolio of 
architectural or machine drawings, and documents 



showing that they have dealt with a particular problems 
skillfully, or other like and appropriate data. 

Registration 

The registration process includes program 
counseling, selection of classes, and payment of fees. 
Newly admitted students will be notified as to when to 
register for their first quarter classes. 

Specific days are set aside prior to each quarter 
for registration. Students are advised to seek assistance in 
course selection from faculty advisors or counselors in the 
Office of Student Services prior to registering for classes. 

Anyone registering after classes begin must have 
instructor's permission and will be charged a $10.00 late 
fee. 

Please contact the Office of Student Services for 
information concerning registration procedures. 
NOTE: STUDENTS ARE NOT REGISTERED 
UNTIL FEES HAVE BEEN PAID. 

Withdrawal Procedure 

Withdrawal is defined as the act whereby a 
student officially files a withdrawal form and discontinues 
course attendance. To be considered officially withdrawn 
from a course, the student must file a withdrawal form 
with the Registrar's Office. TERMINATION OF 
CLASS ATTENDANCE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE 
AN OFFICIAL WITHDRAWAL. Students can 
withdraw from class through the sixth week of each 
quarter. Thereafter, no student withdrawals will be 
accepted. 

AW-Administrative Initiated Withdrawal 

If you attend at least one class session but then 
miss two or more class sessions, your instructor may 
recommend an "AW" designation. This is a permanent 
grade designation that will be reflected on your official 
transcript. The AW will be used to calculate GPA as if it 
were an F. 

NW- No Show Withdrawal 

If you do not attend a class for which you are 
registered and have paid fees, the instructor will recom- 
mend an "NW" status. The NW cancels your registration 
in that class and removes your name from the class list. 

If you have financial assistance, it will be 
cancelled and you will be charged for the classes. To 
prevent this situation from occurring it is important for 
you to sign a drop/add with an SW within the first week 
of the quarter. 

SW-Student Initiated Withdrawal 

If you must withdraw from a course, an S W will 
be given if a drop-add form is completed and submitted to 
the Registrar's Office prior to the end of the sixth week of 
the quarter. 

Note: If you are receiving Financial Assistance, 
please check with that office as many of the above may 



affect your benefits. 

Enrollment Status 

Registration dates are publicized well in advance 
of each new quarter. The following designations are used 
to determine a student's enrollment status. 
Full-time student: (12 or more credits per quarter) 
3/4 time: (9-11 credits per quarter) 
1/2 time: (6-8 credits per quarter) 
Less than 1/2: (1-5 credits per quarter) 

A first year student, by definition, is one who has 
completed up to 45 program specific credit hours; a 
second-year student is one who has completed 46 or more 
program specific credit hours. 

Fees 

Ivy Tech's costs are among the lowest of any 
college in Indiana. Persons enrolled in Ivy Tech courses 
are charged a general fee per credit hour. In addition, 
charges are assessed as they apply to various courses, 
divisional fees, and certain College activities. Tuition and 
fees are subject to change without prior notice by the 
Indiana Vocational Technical College State Board of 
Trustees. 

Schedule of Tuition and Fees for 1988-89(as of 
4-88) 

General Fee 

Indiana Residents: ($28.55 per credit hour) 

Tuition: Out of State Students 

($53.60 per credit hour) 

Divisional Fees 

Division of Business, Office and Information Systems 

Technologies 

($1.25 per credit hour) 

Division of Visual Communications Technologies 

($4.25 per credit hour) 

Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 

($1.25 per credit hour) 

Division of Applied Science and Technologies 

($2.00 per credit hour) 

Student Activity Fee 

The Student Activity Fee varies by enrollment 
status and region. This fee is a part of the required total 
tuition cost The Student Activity Fee is used in a variety 
of ways and positively affects the students. 

Veterans Information 

The Veterans Administration determines 
eligibility for all veterans. Eligible recipients of veteran's 
benefits are entitled to one-and-a-half months of educa- 
tional assistance for every month of active duty (after 
January 31, 1955), up to the maximum of 45 months. 
Educational benefits may be used within 10 years from 




release from active duty. 

The amount of monthly educational allowance 
depends on the number of dependents and the training 
time. For Associate in Applied Science degree students, 
training time is based on the number of credits taken; for 
Technical Certificate students, training time depends on 
the number of credit hours. 

The Office of Veterans Affairs provides assis- 
tance with VA forms and counseling. 

Refund Policy 

Students wishing to withdraw from any courses 
must notify the College Student Records Office 
(Registrar's Office) of their intent to withdraw. The 
request must be in writing on the College Drop/Add form 
which may be obtained from the Program Chairperson, 
Counseling Office or from the Student Records Office. 

NOT ATTENDING CLASS DOES NOT 
CONSTITUTE AN OFFICIAL WITHDRAWAL. 

The refundable amount of the fee assessment is 
determined upon the date the drop request is received by 



the Student Records Office and the beginning date of the 
class. Late registration fees are non-refundable. College 
initiated cancellations of courses will result in total 
refunds. Drop forms received by the Student Records 
Office during: 

Registration through the first week of the class 
result in a 100 percent refund. 

Second week of the class result in a 50 percent 
refund. 

Third week of class result in a 25 percent 
refund. 

No refunds issued after the third week of class. 

Fees regained by the College may be applied to 
courses for the same quarter. 

Students who have financial aid deferments (Pell 
Grants) are'responsible for any balances should they 
drop courses during the refund period. The balance owed 
must be paid upon receipt of a College invoice. 

Refund checks are mailed to the address on the 
student registration form. They are normally mailed prior 
to six weeks from the date of the drop. Any fee, funds, or 
charges owed to the College will be deducted before the 
refund balance is determined. 



10 



Grading System 



The student grading system consists of letter 
grades A-F. Letter grades reflect the quality of perform- 
ance and achievement of competency by students who 
complete a course. In addition to grades, status codes are 
utilized as a condition for which no quality points are 
assigned. Instructors determine and assign both grades 
and status based upon appraisal and evaluation of 
students' performance. Students receive quarterly reports 
of their grades and status. 



U** Unsatisfactory 

T Transfer 

V Verified Competency 



Grade Designations 

Grade Designation 

A 

B 

C 

D 

F 

AW 



Descriptions Points 
Excellent 4 

Good 3 

Average 2 

Min. Passing 1 
Failure 

Non-Completion 
Failure to Attend 



AW- Administrative Initiated Withdrawal 

Students who have attended at least one class 
session and who have been absent for two or more class 
sessions may be recommended as an "AW" by the 
instructor with final approval from the program chairper- 
son unless the instructor has documentation that the 
student is still actively pursuing the course. Proper 
documentation may include completed papers, exams, 
quizzes, projects. 

However, students who wish to appeal the action 
based upon legitimate reasons (illness, vacation, guard 
duty, etc.) for such absences should meet with the 
instructor no later than two weeks after mid-term date 
and demonstrate why the AW should be removed. The 
instructor may then recommend reinstatement with the 
approval of the Division Chairperson or Dean of Instruc- 
tional Affairs and make assignments enabling the student 
to complete the course. Copies of this documentation 
must be given to the Registrar and Financial Assistance 
Office. 

If the AW remains on the student's record, it will 
be used to calculate GPA as if it were an F with zero 
quality points per credit. 

Students who have received an AW may not 
later elect to use the SW (See Non-Grade Designations- 
Status Conditions). « 

Non-Grade Designations — Status Conditions: 

Status Description Points 

I Incomplete 

NW No Show Withdrawal 

SW Student Initiated Withdrawal 

AU* Audit 

S** Satisfactory 



* must be declared at time of registration 

** Non-program related courses only — must be declared 

at time of registration. 

These non-grades are used for the following 



I-Incomplete 

"I" designations are received by students who 
have actively pursued a course and are doing passing 
work at the end of the course, but who have not com- 
pleted the final examination and /or other specific course 
assignments. 

To remove an "I" designation, a student must 
meet with the instructor to make arrangements to com- 
plete the course work. The instructor must submit the 
grade within 30 calendar days after the end of the follow- 
ing term in which the student received the "I" designation. 
If the instructor is not available, the program/department 
chairperson is responsible for assigning a grade. Longer 
periods may be granted, if authorized in writing by the 
Dean of Instructional Affairs. If an "I" grade is not 
removed within the aforementioned time period, an 
appropriate grade (A,B,C,D,F) will be assigned based 
only on course requirements completed. Students who 
have an "I" grade on their records may not re-register in 
that specific course. However, if the "I" is changed to an 
"F\ the student may then re-register only once for that 
course in order to earn a passing grade. 

NW- No-Show Withdrawal 

"NW" will be used for No-Show Withdrawals. 
Instructors may withdraw a student from any class for 
which the student did not report for the first two weeks of 
the quarter and failed to notify the instructor of intention 
to continue. This administrative action cancels the 
student's registration in that course and the student's 
name will be deleted from the official class list Financial 
Assistance recipients will lose their financial assistance 
and owe the College fees. 

If circumstances warrant, a "NW" student may 
be reinstated. This could happen, e.g., if a student 
received a NW as described above and subsequendy 
began attending on a regular basis. In such a case, the 
student must receive the approval of the instructor and 
must complete the drop/add process to be reinstated in the 
class. Students wishing to withdraw for that quarter 
whould initiate a Student Withdrawal (SW) to avoid the 
penalties of the NW. 

i 
SW-Studentlnitiated Withdrawal 

When students find it necessary to withdraw 
from course(s), they must give formal notification to the 



11 



Registrar at the College and complete appropriate forms. 

Students may officially withdraw from a 
course(s) at their own request through the sixth week of a 
quarter without receiving a failing grade(s). The student's 
advisors should be consulted and proper forms completed. 
These forms are available in the Counseling and Admis- 
sions or Records Offices of each region. Thereafter, a 
student may withdraw only if documented extenuating 
circumstances are submitted to and approved by the Vice 
President/Dean or his designee. The "SW" non-grade 
designation will be entered on the student's academic 
records. 

Students who receive an "AW" may not later 
elect to use the "SW". 

AU-Audit 

An"AU" indicated enrollment is a course for no 
grade or credit. The fees for audited courses are the same 
as those for courses taken for credit Audit status must be 
declared at time of registration with the approval of the 
Instructor or Program Chairperson. Students taking a 
course for credit requirements will have priority over 
audit students if class size is limited. 

S- Satisfactory 

The "S" indicates satisfactory completion of 
course work in situations where either a status of satisfac- 
tory or unsatisfactory (pass/fail) has been arranged by 
prior agreement. Requests for this type of grading-S/U- 
can only be made for non-program related courses and 
must be declared at time of registration. Courses graded 
with "S" or "U" status can not be used to satisfy program 
requirements for degree declared students. 

U- Unsatisfactory 

The "U" indicates unsatisfactory completion of 
course work in situations where either a satisfactory or 
unsatisfactory (pass/fail) has been arranged by prior 
agreement. Requests for this type of grading-S/U-can only 
be made for non-program related courses and must be 
declared at time of registration. Courses graded with "S" 
or "U" status can not be used to satisfy program require- 
ments for degree declared students. 

T- Transfer 

The "T" is used to indicate credits transferred to 
Ivy Tech from other accredited post-secondary institu- 
tions. Transfer credit is assigned following an evaluation 
of equivalence/relevance and is authorized providing the 
credits were earned with grades of A, B, orC. Final 
authority of "T" credit is with the Dean of Instructional 
Affairs, upon recommendation of the department/program 
head. 

V- Verified Competency 

The "V" indicates satisfactory completion of 
course work in situations such as test-outs, credit for 



experience, CLEP, experience for secondary work 
completed through articulation agreements, etc. This 
status is approved by the Dean of Instructional Affairs, 
upon recommendation of faculty advisor, following 
completion of necessary verification and documentation 
of competency. 

Mid-Term Grades (Optional) 

Instructors may assign mid-term grades to 
students in each course. The grades are to be submitted 
no later than the sixth week of the quarter. 

Students taking prerequisite courses must receive 
C or better in that course in order to register in the next 
level course. It is the responsibility of the faculty advisor 
to verify satisfactory academic progress. However, 
students may register in other courses not requiring 
prerequisites. 

Student Class Attendance— IMPORTANT 

Nonattendance may result in the nonattainment 
of course objectives and, consequently, in failure grades. 
Students with financial assistance who fail to attend the 
classes will lose their financial assistance and owe the 
College fees. Students who miss class sessions must 
check with instructors about their standing in the course. 
Faculty are encouraged to follow-up students who miss 
two consecutive weeks or less and do not contact the in- 
structor. The names of all student missing two consecu- 
tive weeks will be forwarded to the Student Services 
Office for additional follow-up. 



Academic Standards 



Course of Study 

A "course of study" at Ivy Tech is defined as an 
identified series of courses leading to an educational/ 
career goal. Pursuing a course of study is to enroll and 
attend classes within the approved program and work 
toward an AS, AAS, or TC. Certification requirements 
for a course of study include: required technical courses, 
required general education courses, and regionally 
determined electives. 

Grade Point Average 

Grade point average (GPA) is an accumulative 
average of a student's grades. All Ivy Tech coursework, 
with the exception of skills advancement courses, 
completed by the student with assigned letter grades of 
A,B,C,D, F or AW contributes to the cumulative grade 
point average. Status of I,T,S, U.AU, v, SW, NW, etc., 
are not included in the grade point average. Both the 
quarterly and cumulative GPA's are obtained by dividing 
the total number of quality points earned by the total 
number of credits earned in approved courses. When a 



12 



student repeats a course, the cumulative grade point 
average will reflect only the highest grade achieved in 
that course. Also, in such cases, the number of credits 
earned will apply only to the course for which the highest 
grade was achieved. 

Under extenuating circumstances (mis-advise- 
ment, etc.), a student may petition the Academic Status 
Committee to exclude certain course work (up to 15 
quarter hours) from the cumulative GPA calculation. The 
petition must be presented to the committee within two 
quarters of the time the courses to be excluded were 
taken. Any courses that have been excluded from the 
cumulative GPA calculation will be counted as attempted, 
but not earned and can not be used to satisfy program 
requirements for degree declared students. 

Program Specific Accum 

The cumulative Program Specific Accum (PSA) 
is calculated on the basis of all courses in which a student 
received grade designations toward the course of study. 
A 2.0 cumulative PSA in all courses required for the 
course of study (general education, technical courses, 
electives) is the minimum qualification for graduation or 
program completion. When appropriate , and approved 
by the Dean of Instructional Affairs, course work 
receiving non-computable status of T (transfer credit) or 
V (verified competency credit) may be counted as credit 
toward degree completed. 



six or more credit hours in a given quarter to have any 
earned credits from other colleges submitted for evalu- 
ation by the College's Registrar by the midpoint of the 
first quarter of registration. This information will be 
rendered on the student's records by the end of the first 
quarter. All students enrolled for a certificate/degree 
must satisfy the College's prerequisite for the program 
prior to enrollment. 

Credit hours which are not used to calculate 
GPA and PSA and which do not count toward graduation 
include: 

—all NW's, and SW's 
— AU's 
— I's 
— S's 
— U's 

— Basic Skills Advancement Courses 
— Occurrence(s) of a repeated course(s) with the lowest 
grade(s) achieved. 

Although transfer credits from other colleges/ 
universities may be counted towards graduation, these 
credits are not used to calculate cumulative GPA and 
PSA. 

Students who have difficulty maintaining the 
appropriate minimum GPA and/or PSA must see their 
faculty advisor or consult the Office of Student Services 
at their region for advice and assistance. 



Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average 

Students who have declared a certificate/degree 
objective and who have six or more cumulative grade 
hours attempted must maintain the following minimum 
cumulative GPA to be considered in satisfactory aca- 
demic standing: 



Quarter Hours Attempted 

6-15 

16-30 

31-45 

46 or more 

Quarter Hours Attempted 

46 or more 



Minimum Cumulative 
GPA Required 

1.50 
1.75 
1.90 
2.00 

Minimum Cumulative 
PSA Required 
2.0 



Academic Status 

Academic status will be calculated for students 
who have six or more cumulative earned hours toward 
their chosen course of study. Earned hours include: all 
grades A-F; all AW's; and the highest grade achieved n 
any repeated courses. 

It is the responsibility of all students enrolling in 



Standards of Progress 

Students who do not achieve the minimum GPA 
and/or PSA (see Minimum Cumulative Grade Point 
Average above) at the end of each quarter of enrollment 
are failing to meet the college's standards of progress and 
will be placed on Academic Probation for the following 
quarter. However, students will be considered to be in 
good academic standing in the first quarter of Academic 
Probation with the understanding that they must raise 
their cumulative GP A/PSA to meet the minimum cumula- 
tive GP A/PSA in the next quarter/term. Students failing 
to meet standards of progress will be subject to specific 
enrollment restrictions including early registration for the 
following quarter. 

A student who is not meeting standards of 
progress is: restricted to enrollment in no more than 
twelve quarter hours of new course credits and not more 
than a minimum total of fifteen quarter hours during any 
quarter in the College. If enrolling in more than twelve 
quarter hours in regular quarter credits, a student will be 
required to repeat a course or courses in which he/she 
'received a grade of D or F. 

Failure to meet standards of progress for one 
quarter may also result in one or more of the following: 

a. Required attendance at special counseling 
sessions. 

b. Enrollment in skills advancement courses. 

c. Disqualification for graduation. 



13 



Students who are not meeting standards of 
progress and who do not improve by the end of the next 
quarter/term shall not be allowed to register for the 
following quarter. "No improvement" means the student 
has not achieved the applicable minimum cumulative 
GP A/PSA required in accordance with this Academic 
Standards Policy or has not successfully completed at 
least six credit hours and attained a 2.00 or better quar- 
terly GPA for the probationary quarter. Students attaining 
a 2.00 quarterly GPA for the probationary quarter will be 
allowed to enroll but will remain on Academic Probation 
until attaining the minimum cumulative GPA required in 
accordance with this Academic Standards Policy. Fol- 
lowing the quarter of non-enrollment, a student may re- 
enroll as a degree/certificate seeking student with an 
Academic Probation although the student can not receive 
Title IV financial assistance. Students may re-enroll at 
any time on a non-degree seeking or skills advancement 
basis. Students will be terminated from the College for 
five years if prevented from enrolling twice on an 
Academic Probation status unless they choose to partici- 
pate in a extensive skill advancement program to correct 
academic deficiencies. 

Students who are not allowed to register at one 
of the regions may not register at any of the other regions; 
however , they may petition for re-admission at the 
college (region) which they originally attended. The re- 
admission petition may be approved by the administration 
for good and sufficient reason by the College's Academic 
Status Committee. 

In addition, failure to meet the standards of 
progress will result in one or more of the following: 

a. Discontinuance of financial assistance 
eligibility. 

b. Discontinuance of Veterans' benefits. 

c. Attendance at special counseling sessions 
(when a student is not making satisfactory progress, the 
academic advisor may counsel the student to consider 
another program more suited to the student's interests 
and abilities). 

d. Enrollment in skills advancement courses 
only. 

e. Limiting or reducing course load. 

f. Disqualification from graduation in the 
student's program. 

Repeating Courses 

When a student repeats a course (allowable once 
in most programs for D, F or AW grades), the highest 
grade received shall be counted in the student's cumula- 
tive GPA and PSA if applicable. In unusual circum- 
stances, the student may petition the Dean of Instructional 
Affairs to grant special permission to repeat a course 
more than once and have highest grade count 



Academic Probation 

A student is placed on academic probation when 
he/she fails to maintain a GPA of 2.0. At this point 
counseling and/or advising may intervene. Students are 
automatically removed from probation if satisfactory 
progress status is made. For further information, contact 
the Office of Student Services. 

Special Problems 

Students with special problems should work with 
an Ivy Tech counselor to resolve the problems. 

Graduation 

The degree of Associate in Applied Science or 
other appropriate certificate is awarded by the College to 
students who meet graduation and certification eligibility 
requirements. Graduation ceremonies are held once a 
year. Graduating students are charged a fee to cover the 
cost of ceremonial cap and gown. 

Each student entering the final quarter of training 
prior to graduation will complete an Application of 
Graduation. The application will be certified by the 
student's advisor and forwarded to the Registrar's office 
where the appropriate diploma will be prepared. Diplo- 
mas will not be prepared for students failing to make 
application for graduation. 

A student is considered eligible for graduation 
when he/she fulfills the requirements for graduation and 
certification eligibility at his/her program level. 

To graduate with an Associate in Applied 
Science Degree, the student must 

1. attain a grade point index of 2.0 in the 
required technical and general education courses, with not 
more than one course in each of these areas at a "D" or 
lower performance level; 

2. complete successfully all courses within 
certification requirements with a grade point index of 2.0; 

3. earn the last 15 credits as a regular student of 
Ivy Tech, rather than by test-out or other means of 
advanced placement; 

4. complete successfully the Ivy Tech certifica- 
tion requirements; 

5. satisfy all financial obligations to the College. 

To graduate with a Technical Certificate, the 
student must: 

1 . attain a grade point index of 2.0 in the 
required technical courses with not more than one course 
at a "D" or lower performance level; 

2. complete successfully all courses within 
certification requirements with a grade point index of 2.0; 

3. earn the last 15 credits as a regular student of 
Ivy Tech , rather than by test-out or other means of 
advanced placement; 

4. complete successfully the Ivy Tech certifica- 
tion requirements; 

5. satisfy all financial obligations to the College. 



14 



Placement 

The Placement Office at each region of Ivy Tech 
assists registered graduates and students in finding jobs. 
Interested students should register for placement assis- 
tance at the Office of Student Services, which will: 

1 . advise candidate of the College placement 
service; 

2. distribute registration forms for the placement 
service; 

3. provide occupational information, including 
employment trends and local and state occupational 
outlook data; 

4. assist the registered candidate in prepar- 
ingpacket of credentials for use in finding a job. The 
packet may include: 

a. a resume of candidate's education and 
employment experience; 

b. personal letters of recommendation verifying 
the student's employability; 

5. maintain original copies of the candidate' s 
credentials; 

6. prepare copies of credentials released by the 
candidates for referral to prospective employers. Alumni 
may update their credentials whenever they wish to use 
the placement service. 

Student Conduct 

Standards of Conduct 

Students enrolled at Indiana Vocational Techni- 
cal College are expected to conduct themselves in a 
mature, dignified, and honorable manner. The reputation 
of the College in the community depends in large part 
upon the behavior of its students. 

Students are subjected to College jurisdiction on 
College matters during their period of enrollment. The 
College reserves the right to take disciplinary action 
against any student whose conduct, in the opinion of Ivy 
Tech representatives, has not been in the best interest to 
other students or the College. Disciplinary action may 
consist of verbal reprimand, restitution for damages, 
restriction of privileges, suspension, dismissal, denial of 
admission or re-admission. Students, in turn, have the 
right to due process. 

All Ivy Tech students are expected to abide by 
the following rules of conduct 

College Rules 

1 . Possession or Influence of Alcoholic 
Beverages 

Any student found guilty of drinking, being 
under the influence of or possession of intoxicating 
beverages on College property is subject to disciplinary 
action and state law. • 



2. Illegal Use of Drugs 

The illegal use of drugs is strictly prohibited 
on College property. Any student found using, under the 
influence of, in possession of, or distributing illegal drugs 
is subject to disciplinary action and state law. 

3. Smoking 

Students may smoke in private offices, 
conference rooms, and other areas as designated by the 
Vice President/Dean. Smoking is generally prohibited in 
carpeted areas and in posted "no smoking" areas in 
accordance with fire regulations as well as consideration 
of campus environment. 

4. Assembly 

Persons shall not assemble in a manner that 
obstructs the free movement of others about the campus, 
inhibits the free or normal use of the College buildings 
and facilities, or prevents or obstructs normal operation of 
the College. 

5. Signs 

Students may not erect signs on campus or 
display signs or posters except on designated bulletin 
boards, without the authorization of the Vice President/ 
Dean or his designee. Also, students shall not deface, 
alter, tamper, destroy, or remove any sign or inscription 
on College property. 

6. Solicitation of Funds 

No student organization may use campus 
facilities or schedule activities to solicit funds without 
the approval of the Vice President/Dean or his designee. 

7. Arms/Deadly Weapons 

Firearms (except for those possessed by 
police officers) are strictly prohibited on College property 
or at any College sponsored activity held elsewhere. Any 
student possessing deadly weapons at these locations is 
subject to disciplinary action. 

8. Cheating 

Any student found cheating on papers or tests 
is subject to disciplinary action. Such action may be 
taken in accordance with College procedures as deemed 
necessary to the instructor. 

9. Counterfeiting and Altering 
Students shall not copy or alter in any 

manner, shape or form any record, document, or identifi- 
cation form used or maintained by the College. 

10. Theft of Property 

Any theft of personal or College property 
will be treated as a violation of College rules. 

11. Vandalism 

The destruction or mutilation of College 
books, magazines, equipment, or building is prohibited. 
Such action may result in restitution and/or other discipli- 
nary measures. 

12. Use of College Facilities 

Students are permitted on campus during 
normal College hours and at other times established in the 
College calendar. Students wishing to utilize College 
facilities at other times must request permission from the 



15 



Vice President/Dean or his designee 

13. Financial Responsibility 

Students owing fees, fines, or loans shall not 
be permitted to register for a succeeding session. Grades, 
records, degree, etc., will not be awarded until debts to 
the College are paid. 

14. Misuse of Motor Vehicles 

The College has established student, staff, 
and visitor parking. All persons are required to park in 
designated areas and to adhere to College parking 
regulations. Posted speed limits must be obeyed. 

15. Harassment 

Any student harassing students or staff will 
face disciplinary action. 

16. Physical or Verbal Altercations or Abuses 

No student may strike or threaten other 
students or College personnel or disrupt or interfere in 
any way with the educational process of other students or 
the College staff. 

Violations 

Persons found in violation of laws and ordi- 
nances on College property shall be subject to prosecution 
by law enforcement official(s). 

Persons found in violation of College regulations 
shall be subject to disciplinary action by the College 
through due process procedures for student conduct 
violations. 

The College maintains jurisdiction over matters 
such as, but not limited to, alcoholic beverages, illegal use 
of drugs, smoking, financial responsibilities, motor 
vehicles, assembly, soliciting, use of College facilities, 
the posting or erection of signs, theft, arms/deadly 
weapons, harassment, cheating, counterfeiting, and 
vandalism. 

Due Process Procedures 

Due Process provides the College an appropriate 
mechanism to deal with violation of student conduct and 
conversely allows a student with a disagreement to grieve 
against a College personnel's decision affecting that 
student The intent of due process is to provide a process 
or procedure for unbiased review of a particular case or 
situation. The intent, rather than the mechanism, is 
the focus of this process. Thus, exceptions to the 
specifics and mechanisms can and will be made. 

Due Process Procedures for Student Conduct Viola- 
tions 

Generally in the due process a College staff 
member will point out unwanted or unfavorable behav- 
iors. If the behavior is in violation of acceptable student 
conduct, the staff member may evoke disciplinary 
measures. If necessary, the process moves from the 
individual College member to his/her respective supervi- 
sor for review. If the student's action continues or further 
action is necessary, the College staff member will 



continue to pursue the standard procedure of discussing 
the situation with her/her supervisor. 

The student will be apprised of the unwanted 
behaviors and the steps necessary to correct the behaviors. 
At this point the appropriate supervisor can also recom- 
mend required counseling or follow one of several 
disciplinary action tracts, including but not limited to, 
verbal reprimand, restitution for damages, restitution of 
privileges, suspension or dismissal. 

If the student disagrees with the course of action 
set forth, the student may then ask to see a manager or 
department heard or divisional chairperson, whichever is 
appropriate in the hierarchial structure. After review and 
recommendation at that level the student, if unsatisfied, 
can see the appropriate Director or Dean of the area of the 
College such as the Dean of Instructional Affairs or the 
Director of Student Services. 

1. All cases or appeals of student misconduct and/or lack 
of academic integrity must be referred to one of the 
Administrators. 

2. The administrator may evoke temporary suspension of 
the student of not more than five school days. If there is 
still not resolution from a director or Dean's level, due 
process involves requesting a review by the Student 
Status Committee. All cases or appeals meriting suspen- 
sion or disciplinary dismissal must be referred to the 
Student Status Committee. 

3. Students recommended for dismissal will be notified by 
their advisors in writing. Students will be given an opportu- 
nity to appeal the decision of the Student Status Committee 
if they so choose. Each region of the College has a Commit- 
tee on Student Status, composed of at least two instructors, 
two students designated by the Student Senate, and two ad- 
ministrative persons. 

4. The Student Status Committee deals with all cases 
relating to disciplinary actions or the academic status of 
students. Each regional institute has a Student Status 
Committee that makes recommendations to the Vice Presi- 
dent/Dean. 

a. The Student Status Committee will be 
composed of at least six members, including two full- 
time instructional staff members and two administrative 
staff persons appointed by the Vice President/Dean of the 
region. The additional two members will be students 
designated by the Student Senate. The Committee's 
review and subsequent disposition of a formal complaint 
will begin no later than thirty (30) days after receipt of the 
written complaint Staff legal counsel, as needed, will be 
available to the Committee. 

b. The Student Status Committee will assure the 
due process. A written statement will be presented to the 
student by the chairman of the Student Status Committee. 
The student will be invited to speak on his/her own 
behalf. 

c. The chairperson of the Student Status 
Committee will notify the student and necessary staff in 



16 



advance of the meeting of the Student Status Committee 
(and the written grievance) within one week by mail 
(preferably registered). 

d. The Student Status Committee will issue a 
recommendation to the Vice President/Dean who will 
make a final decision in the grievance process. 

e. All parties involved will be informed in 
writing of the decision of the Student Status Committee 
and of the subsequent recommendations to the Vice 
President/Dean, whose decision is final. 

f. If the student disagrees with the Student 
Status Committee recommendation, he/she may fde a 
complaint with the regional Vice President/Dean within 
72 hours after notification of the Student Status 
Committee's decision. 

g. Exceptions to these rules may be made in 
extenuating circumstances at the discretion of the Vice 
President/Dean or his designee upon request by the party 
involved. 

h. Copies of the above process are available to 
all students at the Learning Resource Center. 

Student Grievances 

Students may bring legitimate grievances to the 
attention of their instructors or other advisors. Time will 
be provided for grievance conferences within two weeks 
of the complaint The purpose of the conference is to 
discuss the problem and to find, if possible, a mutually 
satisfactory resolution. 

If the grievance concerns an instructor or an 
advisor, the student may request a conference with a 
department head, chairperson, the Director of Student 
Services, or the Dean of Instructional Affairs, as deemed 
appropriate. The conference will be held within two 
weeks of notice of the complaint. 

The student who determines that the grievance 
has not been adequately addressed by these methods may 
continue the process by requesting a hearing by the 
Student Status Committee. 

a. The Student Status Committee will be 
composed of at least six members, including two full- 
time instructional staff members and two administrative 
staff persons appointed by the Vice President/Dean of the 
region. The additional two members will be students 
designated by the Student Senate. The Committee's 
review and subsequent disposition of a formal complaint 
will begin no later than thirty (30) days after receipt of the 
written complaint Staff legal counsel, as needed, will be 
available to the Committee. 

b. The Student Status Committee will assure the 
due process. A written statement will be presented to the 
student by the chairman of the Student Status Committee. 
The student will be invited to speak on his/her own 
behalf. 

c. The chairperson of the Student Status 
Committee will notify the student and necessary staff in 
advance of the meeting of the Student Status Committee 



(and the written grievance) within one week by mail 
(preferably registered). 

d. The Student Status Committee will issue a 
recommendation to the Vice President/Dean who will 
make a final decision in the grievance process. 

e. All parties involved will be informed in 
writing of the decision of the Student Status Committee 
and of the subsequent recommendations to the Vice 
President/Dean, whose decision is final. 

f. If the student disagrees with the Student 
Status Committee recommendation, he/she may file a 
complaint with the regional Vice President/Dean within 
72 hours after notification of the Student Status 
Committee's decision. 

g. Exceptions to these rules may be made in 
extenuating circumstances at the discretion of the Vice 
President/Dean or his designee upon request by the party 
involved. 

h. Copies of the above process are available to 
all students at the Learning Resource Center. 




17 



Instructional Support Services Division 

Division Office, North Meridian Center, Room 230 



It is the mission of the Instructional Support Services Division, 
through a strong General Education Program, to stimulate the full 
intellectual, emotional, and social development of each student. The 
knowledge, skills, and attitudes gained in general education courses 
also undergird, broaden, and augment the college's technical curriculum. 
Recognizing the essential value of the general education curriculum, 
all associate degree programs require approximately 25% of degree 
credits in general education courses. The division also provides instruc- 
tion in a comprehensive skills advancement program, known as 
ACCESS, which develops basic skills, attitudes and learning processes 
in order that students may enter and be successful in college programs. 
Additionally, the division provides an integrated system of academic 
and counseling support services as well as a Learning Resource Center 
with library and audio-visual services. 

General Education: 

Based on the belief that an associate degree should prepare students 
not only to enter the work force but also to become full participants 
in the complex, rapidly evolving multiple environments of American 
society, the General Education Program provides instruction in 
mathematics, physical science, communication, and social science, as 
well as a learning support system of counseling and tutoring, and 
additional support services through the Library/Learning Resource 
Center. 

Mathematics and Science 

Mathematics is an essential skill in meeting the ever-changing needs 
of our increasingly complex society. Its study develops logical reason- 
ing and methods of analysis and problem-solving. The application of 
these skills is required of all productive citizens. 

The study of science leads to an understanding of the basic prin- 
ciples as well as the physical and life processes in our natural world. 
Each individual should be aware of the interaction between components 
of our world and the adaptations made to accommodate these 
interactions. 

The mathematics and sciences program provides program level 
mathematics and science courses, including Applied Mathematics, 
Technical Mathematics, Business Mathematics, Mathematics of 
Finance, Geometry, Trigonometry, Technical Calculus, Statistics, 
Physical Science, Physics, Chemistry and Biology. 

Communications and Social Science 

Recognizing that language is the foundation for all learning, the 
communications program encourages the use of language first as a 
creative tool to develop and organize an understanding of self and 
others. Using this understanding as a fulcrum, the clear, concise ex- 
pression of ideas in speaking and writing becomes a powerful force 
in the interaction between people and cultures and ultimately in shap- 
ing a common future. Individuals develop proficiency in process-oriented 
composition, oral presentation, and business writing. 

The study of social science focuses first on an examination of the 
student's own perception, motivation and striving for fulfillment. From 
that vantage point, further study explores the commonality and diversity 
of human experience in a pluralistic society. Students learn to under- 
stand and apply the principles of human behavior in social and pro- 
fessional relationships by focusing on individual and group processes. 

Courses are offered in written communications, oral communica- 
tions, business communications, technical report writing as well as 
courses in human relations, applied psychology, and sociology. 

Library/Learning Resource Center 

The Library/Learning Resource Center is a source of reference 
materials, leisure reading materials, materials related to all program 
areas of the College, career exploration materials, general magazines 
and newspapers, audio-visual materials and equipment, inter-library 
book loans, text books on reserve, reference service, library use 
assistance, and pay photocopying. There are two locations: Hours at 
East Washington Center and North Meridian Center are Monday 
through Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. and Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 
4:00 p.m. The North Meridian Center is also open 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 
p.m. on Saturday. 



Skills Advancement — Access Program: 

Developing basic skills, attitudes and learning processes in order 
that students may enter and be successful in college programs, the 
ACCESS program is a comprehensive system of services including initial 
assessment of skills, specialized counseling services, ongoing course 
placement and classroom and lab instruction in basic mathematics, 
language, and social science. Additional learning assistance is provided 
through small-group and one-on-one tutoring and computer-assisted 
instruction. The ACCESS program also provides comprehensive ser- 
vices for special needs students and non-native speakers of English. 

Instruction 

Introductory mathematics courses, Basic Mathematics Skills, 
Mathematics Skills, Intermediate Mathematics Skills, Pre-Technology 
Mathematics I and II, are usually offered twice a week for two hours 
in the morning, afternoon and evening. Some once-a-week, four-hour 
sessions are also available. 

Introductory communications courses provide classroom instruc- 
tion augmented by individual tutorial, laboratory and computer-assisted 
instruction which affords the students a variety of opportunities for 
developing expressive and receptive communication skills. 

The Learning Development program accepts students who, as a 
result of orientation testing, show a low profile in all academic areas. 
After an intensive, two-quarter program of instruction in reading, 
speech, critical thinking, mathematics and writing, the progress of these 
probationary students is assessed. Those who show the potential for 
success in college-level programs are recommended for completion of 
their developmental requirements. 

English as a Second Language offers highly flexible morning and 
evening programs for non-native speakers of English, with individu- 
alized and group learning. Included are listening, speaking, reading, 
writing, grammar, and study skills, along with a number of the College's 
occupational/technical courses. Counseling and other services are also 
available for foreign students and resident immigrants. 

Academic Support Services 

Expert one-on-one tutoring for any course offered by ACCESS or 
ISSD is available in the Tutoring Lab in room 258 at the North Meri- 
dian Center. The hours are Monday through Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 
8:30 p.m. and Friday 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Appointments are optional. 

The Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) Lab offers two micro- 
computer labs, one at North Meridian Street and one at East 
Washington Street, which help students learn concepts and provide 
students with adequate drill and practice sessions in such areas as the 
following: communication skills, mathematics and science skills, English 
as a second language and technical vocabulary for the deaf. 

Special Services 

Testing for course placement and admission to Ivy Tech programs 
is provided weekly. Included in this session are assessments of reading, 
writing and mathematics ability. Students who need to complete GED 
certification or who wish to receive credit by testing out of a course 
should contact the Testing Center for procedures. 

Counseling Services through the ACCESS program include 
academic counseling, career testing and counseling, financial aid 
counseling and personal development counseling. These services are 
available to students who need supplemental support in order to suc- 
ceed in their vocational and technical programs. 

The Special Needs Program at Ivy Tech serves those students with 
physical disabilities and learning disabilities that may emerge as barriers 
to their acquiring job skills. Academic support and counseling services 
are provided specifically for students with special needs to enhance 
their independence and career preparation. 



18 



Division of 
Applied Science 
and Technologies 



The Division of Applied Science and 
Technologies provides broad, practical 
education for those seeking employment 
and advancement in trade and technical 
occupations. The programs emphasize the 
ability to think and plan in the job setting. 
Initial laboratory experiences develop skills 
in the use of modern industrial equipment 
and measuring instruments. Later classroom 
and laboratory work provide training in 
industrial applications of theory, analysis, 
design and construction techniques. Each 
program provides opportunities for the student 
to advance from basic skills to proficiency on a 
high technological level. 

Program advisory committees, composed of 
experts in each area of industry, serve the 
important function of keeping the content of the 
program current with changes in technology. 
Ivy Tech's programs and courses are designed 
to meet the needs of business and industry. 
The practical value of the course work is 
substantiated by its use in the training 
programs of many local industries. 



19 



Applied Fire Science Technology 

Every year, fire destroys thousands of lives and property worth 
millions of dollars. Professional and volunteer firefighters and fire 
prevention technicians help protect the public from this danger. 

Demands for personnel in this field are expected to increase 
steadily. As new fire departments are formed and others enlarge, 
employment should rise. Employment opportunities may be found 
with local fire departments, industrial plants, or fire underwriter's 
groups. All new personnel in this field must successfully pass 
certain written and physical examinations. 

The Applied Fire Science program emphasizes skills in the 
acquisition of technical and general training, and the development 
of mature judgment necessary in firefighting as well as administra- 
tion. The College offers a variety of courses and it is possible 
that only one course will meet a student's educational objective. 
In other cases the student may wish to pursue the Associate in 
Applied Science degree, which normally requires two years of 
study for the full-time student. 



Applied Fire Science Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE * 

First 5313 

Quarter 5314 

8203 

8401 


' COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

Introduction to Fire Technology 3 
Fire Apparatus 1 3 
Technical Mathematics 1 4 
Human Relations 4 
TOTAL 


Second 
Quarter 


5323 
5324 
5322 
8402 
8110 


Fire Apparatus 2 

Fire Department Hydraulics 1 

Electricity 

Applied Behavioral Psychology 

Communications 

TOTAL 


3 
3 
3 
4 
4 


Third 
Quarter 


5332 

5333 

5325 
3250 
8114 


Fire Fighting Strategy and 

Tactics 1 
Fire Alarm and Protection 

Equipment 
Fire Department Hydraulics 2 
Emergency Medical Technician 1 
Technical Reporting 

TOTAL 


3 

3 

2 
4 
3 


Fourth 
Quarter 


5343 
5342 
5334 

3251 
8307 


Rescue Practices and Procedures 
Hazardous Materials 1 
Fire Fighting Strategy and 

Tactics 2 
Emergency Medical Technician 2 
General Chemistry 

TOTAL 


3 
3 

2 
4 
3 


Fifth 
Quarter 


0913 
5350 

5352 
5353 
5351 


Techniques of Supervision 
Applied Chemistry 
Hazardous Materials 2 
Fire Investigations 
Industrial Safety and Fire 
Control 

TOTAL 


3 
2 
3 
4 

3 


Sixth 
Quarter 


5360 
5362 
5363 
5364 


Fire Service Inspection 

Fire Department Specifications 

Fire Prevention 

Legal Problems in Fire Service 


4 
4 
4 
4 



TOTAL 16 

Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 92 

Applied Fire Science Technology 

Technical Certificate 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

First 5313 Introduction to Fire Technology 3 

Quarter 5314 Fire Apparatus 1 3 

8203 Technical Matehmatics 1 4 

8401 Human Relations 4 

TOTAL 14 



Second 
Quarter 


5323 
5324 
8402 
8110 
8307 


Fire Apparatus 2 

Fire Department Hydraulics 1 

Applied Behavioral Psychology 

Communications 

General Chemistry 

TOTAL 


3 
3 

4 
4 
3 


Third 
Quarter 


5333 

5325 
5350 
5362 
5364 


Fire Alarm and Protection 

Equipment 
Fire Department Hydraulics 2 
Applied Chemistry 
Fire Department Specifications 
Legal Problems in Fire Science 
TOTAL 


3 
2 
2 
4 
4 



Total Technical Certificate Credits 



20 



Architectural Drafting /CAD Technology 

Architectural Drafting is a career encompassing many of the 
planning tasks necessary to communicate the architect's designs 
in graphic form to the builder/contractor. 

Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) courses are offered as an 
integral part of both Drafting Programs. Students are provided with 
the opportunity to train on up-to-date CAD equipment early in their 
curriculum. 

Ivy Tech offers a variety of courses to make it possible for the 
student to meet his or her individual educational objectives. For 
some this may be accomplished by completing just one or two 
courses. Other students will want to pursue the College's 
Associate in Applied Science degree in Architectural Drafting. This 
program, will normally take a full-time student approximately two 
years to complete and will prepare him/her for a variety of career 
opportunities. 

Entry level opportunities include detailing on board or CAD, 
knowledge of building codes, working with contract documents, 
estimating, and field observations. A student will probably be 
employed by architects, structural and mechanical-electrical 
systems engineers, contractors, sub-contractors, and building 
equipment and materials suppliers. 



Architectural Drafting Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 



First 
Quarter 


7581 
9472 

8203 
8401 


Drafting Fundamentals 
Computer Programming for 

Technicians 
Technical Mathematics 1 
Human Relations 

TOTAL 


6 

3 
4 
4 


Second 
Quarter 


7520 

7522 
5422 

5456 
8208 


Descriptive Geometry 
Production Drawing 
Residential Construction 

Materials 
CAD Fundamentals 
Geometry 

TOTAL 


3 
3 

3 
3 
3 


Third 
Quarter 


5430 
5457 
7558 
7543 
8110 


Light Construction Presentation 
3 Dimensional CAD 
Sheet Metal Drafting 
Technical Illustration 
Communications 

TOTAL 


3 
3 
3 
3 
4 


Fourth 
Quarter 


5431 
5433 
5475 
5454 
8209 


Light Construction Layout 
Light Construction Detail 
Topographical Map Drafting 
Interactive CAD 
Trigonometry 

TOTAL 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Fifth 
Quarter 


5432 

5440 

5441 
5452 
8302 


Mechanical and Electrical 

Equipment 
Medium Construction 

Presentation 
Medium Construction Layout 
Estimating 
Mechanics 

TOTAL 


3 

3 
3 
3 
3 


Sixth 
Quarter 


5442 
5450 
5471 
5455 
7552 


Medium Construction Detail 
Heavy Construction Presentation 
Surveying Theory 
Architectural CAD 
Strength of Materials 

TOTAL 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Seventh 
Quarter 


5451 
5453 
5497 

7578 


Heavy Construction Layout 
Heavy Construction Detail 
Computer-Aided Architectural 

Detail 
Piping Fundamentals 


3 
3 

3 

3 



TOTAL 
Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



105 



21 



Automated Manufacturing/Robotics Technology 

The program prepares technicians to design, install, calibrate, 
program, operate, test, analyze, troubleshoot, service, and repair 
advanced manufacturing, assembly, and materials-handling 
systems and data computer networks. A multi-disciplinary 
technological program which utilizes mechanical, electrical, 
thermal, fluids, and/or technologies (1) to shape, form and process 
raw materials into finished products. (2) to assemble parts into 
finished products using sensing, vision, and robotic techniques, 
(3) in automated modern material handling techniques including 
conveyors, manless parts vehicles and storage systems, and (4) 
in computer data communications networks such as machine con- 
trollers, robot controllers, cell computers and computers adapted 
for inventory control and manufacturing. Coursework includes 
microprocessor fundamentals, digital principles, computer pro- 
gramming, sensor and system interfacing, robotics, hydraulics 
and pneumatics, CAD/CAM fundamentals, automated manufac- 
turing fundamentals and technical mathematics. The program 
leads to the Associate in Applied Science degree and normally 
requires approximately two years to complete. 



Automated Manufacturing/ 
Robotics Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 


CREDITS 


First 6471 D.C. Fundamentals 


6 


Quarter 8203 Technical Math 1 


4 


8110 Communications 


4 


9472 Computer Programming for 




Technicians 


3 



Second 6905 Robotics Principles 1 3 

Quarter 6919 Manufacturing Systems Control 3 

6470 AC Fundamentals 6 

8209 Trigonometry 3 



Third 


6907 


Robotics Principles 2 


Quarter 


6447 


Special Semiconductors 




6901 


Manufacturing Processes 




6434 


Active Devices 




8204 


Technical Math 2 


Fourth 


6913 


Automated Manufacturing 


Quarter 




Systems 1 




6903 


Sensor and System Interfacing 




6562 


Digital Principles 1 




6563 


Digital Principles 2 




8302 


Physics 1 (Mechanics) 



Fifth 
Quarter 



6915 Automated Manufacturing 

Systems 2 3 

7341 Hydraulic and Pneumatic 

Principles 3 

6577 Digital Principles 3 3 

6578 Digital Applications 3 
8303 Physics 2 (Heat, Light & Sound) 3 



Sixth 6923 Applied Mechanisms 3 

Quarter 6909 CAD/CAM Fundamentals 3 

6520 Microprocessors 1 3 

7342 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems 3 

8114 Technical Report Writing 3 



Seventh 6911 Work Cell Design 3 

Quarter 6917 Advanced Robotic Systems 3 

6921 Failure Analysis Techniques 3 

8401 Human Relations 4 

Total Credit Hours 



13 
106 



22 



Automotive Body Repair Technology 

Automotive Body Repair Technology, an exciting high-tech and 
service industry, is rising in importance. The increase in the de- 
mand for highly qualified technicians has created new courses 
of study in higher education. 

Since Ivy Tech focuses on auto body repair technology, our 
graduates are capable of using the most up-to-date measuring, 
pulling and painting equipment. Individuals are also trained in 
communication skills, technical math and language, as they relate 
to industrial applications. 

The automotive body repair program provides a one-year 
Technical Certificate. In-depth study of unibody repair, collision 
damage repair, suspension and alignment, chassis and auto paint 
refinishing is available. Our program combines hands-on train- 
ing and classroom lectures, making it one of the most comprehen- 
sive programs of its kind. 



Automotive Body Repair 
Technology 

Technical Certificate 



c< 


3URSE , 


* COURSE TITLE CREDITS 


First 


5601 


Basic Body Repair 1 


2 


Quarter 


5602 


Basic Body Repair 2 


2 




5609 


Basic Body Repair Practicum 1 


1 




5615 


Basic Body Repair Practicum 2 


1 




5626 


Automotive Sheet Metal 








Alignment 


2 




5642 


Welding Practice/Auto Body 1 


3 




8110 


Communications 

TOTAL 


4 


Second 


5603 


Basic Body Repair 3 


2 


Quarter 


5604 


Basic Body Repair 4 


2 




5617 


Automotive Front End Alignment 


2 




5624 


Body Welding 1 


2 




5625 


Automotive Paint Shop Practice 1 


2 




5639 


Fiberglass/Plastic Repair 


2 




5643 


Welding Practice/Auto Body 2 
TOTAL 


3 


Third 


5611 


Collision Damage Repair 1 


2 


Quarter 


5612 


Collision Damage Repair 2 


2 




5613 


Collision Damage Repair 
Practicum 1 


1 




5614 


Collision Damage Repair 
Practicum 2 


1 




5620 


Frame and Chassis Repair 1 


2 




5621 


Frame and Chassis Repair 2 


2 




5622 


Frame and Chassis Repair 3 


2 




8201 


Applied Math 1 

TOTAL 


4 


Fourth 


5616 


Auto Chassis/Accessory Circuits 


3 


Quarter 


5630 


Collision Damage Appraising 


2 




5632 


Auto Paint Shop Practice 2 


2 




5636 


Auto Paint Refinishing 


2 




5638 


Glass Installation 


2 




8401 


Human Relations 


4 



Total Technical Certificate Credits 



23 



Automotive Service Technology 

Automotive Service Technicians perform preventive 
maintenance, diagnose break-downs, and perform repairs on 
automobiles and other motor vehicles. 

Entry level positions may be found in automobile dealerships 
and repair shops, service stations, motor parts, taxi-cab and leas- 
ing companies or by self-employment. 

Ivy Tech's Automotive Service program provides students with 
instruction in the most current techniques and facets of repair, 
maintenance, testing, and supervision, utilizing automotive 
laboratories equipped with the latest service and testing equip- 
ment available. Students may fulfill their educational objectives 
by completing just a course or two or by completing the re- 
quirements for the College's Associate in Applied Science degree 
in Automotive Service. This program, which normally takes the 
full-time student approximately two years to complete, will prepare 
the student for a wide variety of career opportunities. 



Automotive Service Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

First 5813 Automotive Braking Systems 3 

Quarter 5866 Occupational Health and Safety 4 

8110 Communications 4 

8203 Technical Mathematics 1 4 

8304 Physics 1 3 

TOTAL 



Automotive Electronic Systems 3 
Manual Transmission and 

Transaxle 4 

Technical Mathematics 2 4 

Computer Programming for 

Technicians 3 

Physics 2 3 

TOTAL 

Engine Tool and Equipment 3 

Electronic Ignition Systems 3 
Electronic Fuel and Emission 

Control Systems 3 

Front End Systems 3 

General Print Reading 4 
TOTAL 

Start and Charge Systems 3 

Computerized Engine Controls 3 

Engine Overhaul 5 

Automatic Transmission Principles 3 
Hydraulic and Pneumatic 

Principles 3 
TOTAL 

Fifth 5865 Automotive Service Organization 
Quarter and Management 3 

5847 Automotive Air Condition 3 

5845 Advanced Engine Performance 4 
5856 Automatic Transmission 

Overhaul 5 

TOTAL 

Sixth 5862 Comprehensive Automotive Lab 4 
Quarter 8113 Oral Communications 4 

8401 Human Relations 4 

TOTAL 
Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



Second 5851 
Quarter 5835 

8204 
9472 

8305 

Third 5822 

Quarter 5828 

5825 

5814 
7310 

Fourth 5832 

Quarter 5891 

5834 

5854 

7341 



Automotive Service Technology 

Technical Certificate 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDr 

First 5813 Automotive Braking Systems 3 

Quarter 5823 Basic Electricity 3 

5866 Occupational Health and Safety 4 

8110 Communications 4 

8201 Applied Mathematics 1 4 

TOTAL 

Second 5827 Ignition Systems 3 

Quarter 5847 Automotive Air Condition 3 

5835 Manual Transmission and 

Transaxle 4 

5832 Start and Charge Systems 3 

8202 Applied Mathematics 2 4 

TOTAL 



Third 5821 Engine Theory 


3 




Quarter 5826 Fuel and Carburetor Systems 


3 




5814 Front End Systems 


3 




5854 Automatic Transmission 






Principles 


3 




8401 Human Relations 


4 




TOTAL 




16 


Total Technical Certificate Credits 




51 



24 



Electronics Technology 

Electronics is an occupation field in which skilled technicians 
construct, operate, and maintain sophisticated electronic equip- 
ment. Employment opportunities are increasing due to the 
expanding electronics applications in virtually every area of 
applied technology. Those opportunities include service and repair 
of business machines, communications equipment, medical 
instruments and equipment, automotive components, and so forth 
at utility companies, manufacturing plants and many others. 

One or two of Ivy Tech's courses may meet a student's educa- 
tional objective. Other students will meet their objectives by 
pursuing the College's Associate in Applied Science degree in 
Electronics. This program, which will normally take the full-time 
student approximately two years to complete, will give the student 
a foundation in all aspects of Electronics. In the seventh quarter 
the student may select a specialized minor depending on his/her 
interest in either Industrial, Computer Service, or Communication. 



Electronics Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

First 6471 D.C. Fundamentals 6 

Quarter 8203 Technical Mathematics 1 4 

6420 Intro to DP & Computers 3 

TOTAL 

Second 6470 A.C. Fundamentals 6 

Quarter 8209 Trigonometry 3 

8110 Communications (English) 4 

6413 Fabrication 3 

TOTAL 



Third 
Quarter 


6434 
6435 
6455 
8204 
8302 


Introduction to Active Devices 
Electronics Circuits 1 
Circuit Analysis 
Technical Mathematics 2 
Mechanics 

TOTAL 


3 
3 
3 
4 
3 

16 


Fourth 
Quarter 


6447 
6454 
6562 
6563 
6446 


Special Semi-conductors 
Electronics Circuits 2 
Digital Principles 1 
Digital Principles 2 
Integrated Circuits 


TOTAL 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 


Fifth 
Quarter 


6577 
6578 
6451 
6452 
6543 


Digital Principles 3 
Digital Application 
Communications Electronics 1 
Communications Electronics 2 
Basic Industrial Electronics 

TOTAL 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 


Sixth 
Quarter 


6520 
6533 
8303 
6538 
6539 


Microprocessors 1 
Microprocessors 2 
Heat, Light, & Sound 
Rotating Machine 1 
Rotating Machine 2 


TOTAL 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 


Seventh 
Quarter 


xxxx 
xxxx 
6524 
8401 
6584 


Minor Elective 
Minor Elective 
Troubleshooting Techniques 
Human Relations 
Telecommunication 

TOTAL 


3 
3 
3 
4 
3 

16 


Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 


106 


*The minor elective is selected on the student's interest or 
availability of the classes. 


Communication 
6453 
6460 


Communication Electronics 3 
Microwave and Radar 


3 
3 


Computer Service 

6527 Peripherals 1 
6535 Peripherals 2 




3 
3 


Industrial 


6553 

6554 


Industrial Electronics 1 
Industrial Electronics 2 




3 
3 



25 



Heating, Air Conditioning and 
Refrigeration Technology 

Trained heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration technicians 
will be prepared for work in sales, as insulation estimators, furnace 
installers, application repairmen, as well as technicians in heating, 
air conditioning, or refrigeration. Entry level positions may be 
found in office buildings, factories, restaurants, theaters, 
hospitals, governmental agencies, service firms or by 
self-employment. 

The Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration program at Ivy 
Tech is designed to provide students with the skills necessary 
for the first job or for upward mobility. It is possible that one or 
two of the College's wide variety of courses will meet a student's 
educational objectives. Other students will meet their objectives 
by pursuing the College's Associate in Applied Science degree 
in Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration. This program will 
normally take the full-time student approximately two years to 
complete. 



Heating, Air Conditioning and 
Refrigeration Technology 

Technical Certificate 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

First 7112 Heating Fundamentals 3 

Quarter 7113 Basic Electricity for 

Air Conditioning 3 

7114 Basic Mechanics and Shop 

Techniques 3 

7123 Air Conditioning and Refrigeration 
Fundamentals 3 

8201 Applied Mathematics 1 4 

TOTAL 16 

Second 7124 Heating Service— Gas and Oil 3 
Quarter 7126 Air Conditioning and 

Refrigeration 3 

7133 Cooling Service Electrical 3 
7135 Electrical Circuits and Controls 3 
7143 Blueprint Reading 3 

TOTAL 15 

Third 7125 Motors and Motor Control 3 
Quarter 7127 Heating Service Electrical and 

Hydronic 3 

7134 Cooling Service Mechanical 3 
7154 Duct Fabrication and Installtion 3 
7137 Heat Loss/Gain Calculation 3 

TOTAL 15 

Fourth 7145 Heat Pump Service 3 

Quarter 7146 Cooling Service Advanced 3 

8202 Applied Math 2 4 
8110 Communications 4 

TOTAL _J4 

Total Technical Certificate Credits 60 



Heating, Air Conditioning and 
Refrigeration Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE / 


< COURSE TITLE CREDITS 


First 7112 


Heating Fundamentals 3 


Quarter 7113 


Basic Electricity for 




Air Conditioning 3 


7114 


Basic Mechanics and Shop 




Techniques 3 


7123 


Air Conditioning and Refrigeration 




Fundamentals 3 


8201 


Applied Math 1 4 




TOTAL 



Second 7124 Heating Service— Gas and Oil 3 
Quarter 7126 Air Conditioning and 

Refrigeration 3 

7133 Cooling Service Electrical 3 

7135 Electrical Circuits and Controls 3 

8202 Applied Math 2 4 

TOTAL 



Third 


7125 


Motors and Motor Control 


3 


Quarter 


7127 


Heating Service Electrical and 








Hydronic 


3 




7134 


Cooling Service Mechanical 


3 




7154 


Duct Fabrication and Installation 


3 




8110 


Communications 

TOTAL 


4 


Fourth 


7143 


Blueprint Reading 


3 


Quarter 


7144 


Commercial Refrigeration 


3 




7145 


Heat Pump Service 


3 




7146 


Cooling Service Advanced 


3 




8606 


Introductory Welding 

TOTAL 


3 


Fifth 


7136 


Psychrometry 


3 


Quarter 


7137 


Heat Loss/Gain Calculations 


3 




7153 


Commercial Refrigeration 








Advanced 


3 




7163 


Air Distribution System Design 


3 




7147 


Uniform Mechanical Code 

TOTAL 


2 


Sixth 


7155 


Specifications and Estimating 


3 


Quarter 


7162 


Specialized Environmental 








Systems 


3 




7165 


Advanced Electrical Controls 


3 




7528 


Drafting for Heating/ Air 








Conditioning 


3 




7152 


Air Balancing 

TOTAL 


2 


Seventh 


7174 


Service Organization and 




Quarter 




Management 


3 




7175 


Equipment Sales 


3 




7176 


Applied Design 


4 




8401 


Human Relations 


4 



TOTAL 

Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



26 



Industrial Drafting /CAD Technology 

The industrial drafting technician provides an essential link 
between engineering and the production departments. 

Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) courses are offered as an in- 
tegral part of both Drafting Programs. Students are provided with 
the opportunity to train on up-to-date CAD equipment early in their 
curriculum. 

Ivy Tech's wide variety of courses make it possible for the 
student to meet his or her individual educational objectives. For 
some this may be accomplished by completing just one or two 
courses. Other students will want to pursue the College's 
Associate in Applied Science degree in Industrial Drafting. This 
program will normally take a full-time student approximately two 
years to complete, and will prepare him or her for a variety of 
career opportunities. 

Industry and business is constantly searching for technicians 
with the training and ideas to help bring products and services 
to market. Our graduates are employed with large and small 
manufacturing companies, tooling and fabrication companies, as 
well as engineering firms. Jobs vary from entry level detailers (on 
board or CAD) to designers, to CAD systems managers. 



Industrial Drafting Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 



First 
Quarter 



7581 
9472 



8203 
8401 



Drafting Fundamentals 6 
Computer Programming for 

Technicians 3 

Technical Mathematics 1 4 

Human Relations 4 
TOTAL 



Second 7520 

Quarter 7522 

7521 

5456 

8208 

Third 7543 

Quarter 5457 

7558 

5430 

8110 

Fourth 7530 

Quarter 7532 

8209 

5454 

7780 



Descriptive Geometry 
Production Drawing 
Industrial Process and Systems 
CAD Fundamentals 
Geometry 

TOTAL 

Technical Illustration 

3 Dimensional CAD 

Sheet Metal Drafting 

Light Construction Presentation 

Communications 

TOTAL 

Product Drafting 
Tool Drafting 
Trigonometry 
Interactive CAD 
Basic Machine Tool 



TOTAL 



Fifth 
Quarter 



7540 Product Design 

7557 Jig and Fixture 

8064 Metallurgy 

8302 Mechanics 

7762 Precision Measurement 



TOTAL 

Sixth 7541 Advanced Tool and Gauge 
Quarter 7575 N.C. and Data Processing 
7531 Mechanisms and Machines 
7552 Strength of Materials 
5459 Computer-Aided Printed Circuit 
Board 

TOTAL 

Seventh 7578 Piping Fundamentals 
Quarter 7533 Die Design 
7593 CAD/CAM 
7341 Hydraulic and Pneumatic 
Principles 

TOTAL 
Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



105 



Industrial Drafting Technology 

Technical Certificate 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 



CREDITS 



First 7581 Drafting Fundamentals 6 

Quarter 9472 Computer Programming for 

Technicians 3 

8203 Technical Mathematics 1 4 

8401 Human Relations 4 

TOTAL 17 



Second 7520 Descriptive Geometry 
Quarter 7522 Production Drawing 

7521 Industrial Process and Systems 

5456 CAD Fundamentals 

8208 Geometry 

TOTAL 



Third 7543 

Quarter 5457 

7558 

5430 

8110 



Technical Illustration 

3 Dimensional CAD 

Sheet Metal Drafting 

Light Construction Presentation 

Communications 

TOTAL 



Total Technical Certificate Credits 



27 



Industrial Lab Technology 

As the use of industrial and scientific data becomes more com- 
plex, the need for trained industrial lab technicians increases. The 
demand for qualified, highly skilled technicians in research or 
development laboratories, manufacturing plants and computer 
centers has spawned new courses of study in higher education. 

Ivy Tech's curriculum has recognized this demand and made 
the commitment to meet the present and projected needs of 
industry. As a new education area at Ivy Tech, the industrial lab 
technology program is shaped by input from engineers and scien- 
tists. Providing trained technicians, skilled in assuming the every- 
day tasks regularly completed by scientists and engineers, is Ivy 
Tech's goal to meet technological demands. 

As an industrial lab technician, you will analyze and solve basic 
engineering problems, prepare written reports by organizing and 
summarizing data, conduct experiments and tests and work with 
a variety of other technicians in order to coordinate technical jobs. 

To keep engineering and scientific laboratories running effi- 
ciently, the engineer needs a qualified technician knowledgeable 
in mathematics, statistics, chemistry, data processing, com- 
munications and psychology. You can be the link between the 
engineer and the manufacturing plant worker. 

Our industrial lab technology program combines hands-on train- 
ing in the use of scientific calculator, micro-computer and 
computer-aided design systems with classroom lecture, making 
it one of the most comprehensive programs of its kind. 

Program flexibility helps train students in one of industry's 
emerging technologies and provides the opportunity for the com- 
pletion of an Associate in Applied Science degree. 



Industrial Laboratory Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

First 7013 Introduction to Technology 4 

Quarter 8110 Communications 4 

8203 Technical Mathematics 1 4 

8401 Human Relations 4 

TOTAL 

Second 7002 Industrial Laboratory Techniques 4 

Quarter 8209 Trigonometry 3 

8304 Physics 1 (Mechanics) 3 

8307 General Chemistry 3 

9472 Computer Programming for 

Technicians 3 
TOTAL 

Productivity Software Applications 4 
Indus. Instruments 

and Techniques 1 4 

Technical Mathematics 2 4 

Physics 2 (Heat, Light, and Sound) 3 
TOTAL 

Indus. Instruments 

and Techniques 2 4 

Technical Calculus 1 4 

Statistics 3 
Physics 3 (Electricity & Magnetism) 4 

General Microbiology 3 
TOTAL 

Quality Control Concepts & 

Techniques 1 4 

Oral Communications 4 

Technical Reporting 3 

Instrument Electronics— Minor #1 3 

TOTAL 

Sixth 0913 Techniques of Supervision 1 3 

Quarter 7006 Environmental Monitoring 4 

7012 Engineering Graphics— Minor #2 3 

8064 Basic Metallurgy— Minor #3 3 

TOTAL 

Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



Third 


0607 


Quarter 


7004 




8204 




8305 


Fourth 


7005 


Quarter 






8206 




8210 




8306 




8308 


Fifth 


0901 


Quarter 






8113 




8114 




6505 



28 



Industrial Maintenance Technology 

Industrial maintenance technicians spend much of their time 
performing preventative and general maintenance such as equip- 
ment inspection, general maintenance procedures, and record 
keeping for manufacturing industries in foods, primary metals, 
machinery, chemicals, fabricated metal products, transportation 
equipment, paper publishing and rubber. The wide range of 
courses provides instruction in installation and general 
maintenance in three major areas: machine tool, heating and air 
conditioning, and electrical wiring and equipment. Emphasis is 
also placed on industrial safety and health. 

Some students may accomplish their career objectives by com- 
pleting just one or two courses. Other students will want to pur- 
sue the College's Associate in Applied Science degree in 
Industrial Maintenance. This program, which will normally take 
the full-time student approximately two years to complete, will 
prepare the student for a wide range of career opportunities. 



Industrial Maintenance Technology 
Equipment Minor 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 



First 


8203 


Tech Math 


4 


Quarter 


7341 


Basic Hydraulics/Pneumatic 








Principles 


3 




7310 


General Print Reading 


3 




7324 


Industrial Safety 


2 




8110 


Communications 

TOTAL 


4 


Second 


8209 


Trigonometry 


3 


Quarter 


7320 


AC/DC Fundamentals 


3 



7342 Hydraulic/Pneumatic 

System Repair 3 

7322 Construction Basics 3 

7711 Machining Fundamentals 3 

TOTAL 



Third 


8304 


Physics 1 


3 


Quarter 


8401 


Human Relations 


4 




7331 


Electrical Circuits 


3 




7510 


Basic Drafting 


3 




9472 


Computer Programming for Tech 
TOTAL 


3 


Fourth 


7321 


Wiring for Industry 


3 


Quarter 


8066 


Introductory Welding 


3 




7323 


Heating & A/C Basics 


3 




8305 


Physics 2 


3 




7348 


Millwright 1 

TOTAL 


3 


Fifth 


8113 


Oral Communications 


4 


Quarter 


6905 


Robotics Principles 1 


3 



7339 Machine Diagnosis & 

Repair Elect. 3 

7340 Machine Maintenance 3 
7343 Preventive Maintenance 3 

TOTAL 

Sixth 7381 Machine Installation 3 

Quarter 7125 Motors & Motors Control 3 

7352 Troubleshooting Skills 3 

7367 Programmable Controllers 3 

7375 Utilities Distribution 3 

6907 Robotics Principles 2 3 

TOTAL 

Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



Industrial Maintenance Technology 
Facilities Minor 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 



First 


8203 


Tech Math 


4 


Quarter 


7341 


Basic Hydraulics/Pneumatic 








Principles 


3 




7310 


General Print Reading 


3 




7324 


Industrial Safety 


2 




8110 


Communications 

TOTAL 


4 


Second 


8209 


Trigonometry 


3 


Quarter 


7320 


AC/DC Fundamentals 


3 




7342 


Hydraulic/Pneumatic 








System Repair 


3 




7322 


Construction Basics 


3 




7711 


Machining Fundamentals 

TOTAL 


3 


Third 


8304 


Physics 1 


3 


Quarter 


8401 


Human Relations 


4 




7331 


Electrical Circuits 


3 




7510 


Basic Drafting 


3 




8113 


Oral Communications 

TOTAL 


4 


Fourth 


7321 


Wiring for Industry 


3 


Quarter 


8066 


Introductory Welding 


3 




7323 


Heating & A/C Basics 


3 




8305 


Physics 2 


3 




9472 


Computer Programming for Tech 


3 




9413 


Building Trades & Blue Print 








Reading 1 


3 






TOTAL 




Fifth 


6905 


Robotics Principles 1 


3 


Quarter 


6024 


Plumbing Fundamentals 


3 




6036 


Masonry & Concrete 








Fundamentals 


3 




7125 


Motors & Motors Control 


3 




6062 


Floor & Wall Covering 

TOTAL 


3 


Sixth 


7381 


Machine Installation 


3 


Quarter 


7367 


Programmable Controllers 


3 




7340 


Machine Maintenance 


3 




6012 


Roof Construction 


3 




6026 


Advanced Skills in Masonry 


3 



TOTAL 

Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



29 



Machine Tool Technology 

Machine tool technicians are builders, the kind of men and 
women who like to make things with their hands and figure things 
out with their minds. 

Job opportunities may be found in factories that produce 
fabricated metal products, transportation equipment, and 
machinery in large quantities. Demand for these skilled workers 
is expected to increase as metal working and plastic industries 
expand. 

The machine tool program at Ivy Tech is designed to provide 
students with the skills necessary for that first job or for upward 
mobility. Some students will find that one or two courses in an 
area such as specialized machining, setup and operation, machine 
tool processes, blueprint reading, numerical control, or grinding 
will meet their individual educational objectives. Other students 
will want to pursue the College's Technical Certificate. This pro- 
gram normally takes the full-time student approximately one year 
to complete. A five-level Computerized Numerical Control 
Machining Certification is available for those interested in modem 
machining skills. 



Machine Tool Technology 

Technical Certificate 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDr 

First 7710 Machine Tool Introduction 3 

Quarter 7731 Basic Print Reading 3 

7758 Numerical Control and Automated 

Processing 1 3 

8203 Technical Mathematics 1 4 

TOTAL 

Second 7711 Machine Fundamentals 1 3 

Quarter 7759 Numerical Control and Automated 
Processing 2 3 

9441 Shop Mathematics 4 3 

9472 Computer Programming for 

Technicians 3 

TOTAL 

Third 7712 Machine Fundamentals 2 3 

Quarter 7734 Advanced Blueprint Reading 3 

7760 Numerical Control and Automated 

Processing 3 3 

7725 Interactive Numerical Control 

Machining 3 

TOTAL 

Fourth 7733 Advanced Machine Tool Setup 
Quarter & Operations 3 

7740 Specialized Machine Theory 3 

7769 Numerical Control and Automated 

Processing 4 3 

7744 Machinery's Handbook 3 

TOTAL 
Total Technical Certificate Credits 



49 



30 



Pollution Treatment Technology 

Ivy Tech's pollution treatment program provides training in 
wastewater treatment, air pollution control, public water supply, 
and hazardous wastes for municipal and industrial facilities. State 
and Federal environmental regulations are covered in detail to 
help the professional stay current. Courses are offered in plant 
math, equipment and maintenance, and applied chemistry. 

Many courses in Pollution Treatment Technology will involve 
tours to various plants and water treatment sites to give you a 
glimpse of the real work world. Water treatment facilities, 
wastewater plants, the air pollution control offices for Marion 
County, and Indianapolis Power and Light Company are a few of 
the locations visited. 

Of special interest to those already working in the field of 
wastewater treatment are the Plant Operation courses and the 
Applied Chemistry I course. The operations courses can help the 
individual prepare for the State Board of Health Certification 
Examination. The course in Applied Chemistry trains the 
laboratory technician in hands-on performance or required 
monitoring analysis in accordance with Environmental Protection 
Agency mandated procedures. 

With an Associate in Applied Science degree, you may qualify 
as a laboratory technician, facilities operator, wastewater super- 
visor, equipment maintenance technician, or work in solids 
handling or collection systems. 



Pollution Treatment Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

First 7913 Introduction to Environment 
Quarter Control 4 

8203 Technical Mathematics 1 4 

8110 Communications 4 

TOTAL 



Second 8113 

Quarter 8204 

7943 

7916 

Third 7954 
Quarter 7955 

7951 
8307 
xxxx 

Fourth 7964 

Quarter 7961 

7975 

7960 

Fifth 7966 

Quarter 7973 

7963 

8114 

7915 



Plant Mathematics 1 
Plant Operations 2 
Basic Laboratory Skills 
Air Pollution Control 1 

Hazardous Materials 
NPDES Workshop 
Plant Operations 3 
Technical Reporting 
Applied Chemistry 1 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 

Sixth 7972 Environmental Administration 

Quarter 7934 Basic Hydraulics 

7970 Air Pollution Control 2 
7958 Plant Equipment Maintenance 2 
TOTAL 

Seventh 7942 Applied Microbiology 
Quarter 7956 Applied Research 2 

9472 Computer Programming for 

Technicians 
xxxx Elective 

TOTAL 
Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



12 



Oral Communications 4 

Technical Mathematics 2 4 

Water Supply and Treatment 4 

Environmental Seminar 1 

TOTAL 13 

Plant Operations 1 
Management and Supervisory 

Procedures 
Reporting and Purchasing 
General Chemistry 
Elective 

TOTAL 



31 



Welding Technology 

Job opportunities are expected to be quite good for welders 
in the future. Opportunities for welders exist with power plants, 
pipelines, fabrication and building trades, welding service shops, 
utility companies and manufacturing firms. The successful Ivy 
Tech student will be interested in positions such as welder, flame 
cutter, inspector, braiser, spot welder, and fabricator. 

The welding program at Ivy Tech is designed to provide 
students with the skills necessary for that first job or for upward 
mobility. Some students will find that one or two courses in an 
area will meet their individual educational objectives. Other 
students will want to pursue the College's Technical Certificate 
in Welding. This program normally takes the full-time student 
approximately one year to complete. 



Welding Technology 

Technical Certificate 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 



First 
Quarter 



8013 
8063 



8090 
8099 



Blueprint Interpretation 
Electrical Fundamentals for 

Welding 
Shielded Metal Arc Welding 1 
Oxy-acetylene Gas 

Welding/Cutting 

TOTAL 



Third 8202 Applied Mathematics 2 

Quarter 8401 Human Relations 

8075 Welding Fabrications 1 

8096 Gas Metal Arc Welding 



Fourth 8061 

Quarter 8064 

8110 



Pipe Welding 1 
Basic Metallurgy 
Communications 
Welding Certification 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



Second 8024 Welding Blueprint Interpretation 3 

Quarter 8095 Shielded Metal Arc Welding 2 5 

8097 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding 5 

8201 Applied Mathematics 1 4 

TOTAL 



Total Technical Certificate Credits 



32 



Division of Business, 
Office and Information 
Systems Technologies 



Career opportunities in business are expanding 
rapidly. Employment statistics indicate that the 
best jobs in business will be filled by persons 
equipped with the technical skills required in 
today's business world. In recognition of the 
impact of changing technology on business 
careers, Ivy Tech's Division of Business, Office 
and Information Systems Technologies offers 
programs designed to prepare the student for 
employment in one of many occupations relevant 
to Indiana businesses and industries. 



33 



Accounting Technology 

All levels of business, industry and government rely on 
accountants to express, in financial terms, the results of their daily 
transactions. 

Demand for accountants is particularly strong in banks, 
insurance companies, manufacturing firms, government offices 
and professional service organizations. Entry level positions in 
the accounting field include Budget Assistant, Cost Accounting 
Clerk, Bookkeeper, Accounting Technician, Auditing Technician, 
Supply Technician and many others. 

Ivy Tech's Accounting Program provides instruction for initial 
employment or the up-grading of skills. Many students can meet 
their educational objectives by completing just a course or two 
and other students will want to develop their skills to the fullest 
by pursuing the College's Associate in Applied Science degree 
in Accounting. This program, which normally will take the full- 
time student approximately two years to complete, will prepare 
him or her for a wide range of employment opportunities. 



Accounting Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 



First 
Quarter 



0110 Accounting 1 

8110 Communications 

8212 Business Math 

0122 Business Law 1 



Second 0120 

Quarter 1236 

8113 

8401 

Third 0130 

Quarter 0142 

0143 

xxxx 

Fourth 0140 

Quarter 0151 

8213 

0610 



TOTAL 

Accounting 2 

Office Calculating Machines 
Oral Communications 
Human Relations 

TOTAL 

Accounting 3 
Job Cost Accounting 
Business Law 2 
Elective 

TOTAL 



Intermediate Accounting 1 
Process Cost Accounting 
Math of Finance 
Introduction to Microcomputers 
TOTAL 



Fifth 0150 Intermediate Accounting 2 4 

Quarter 0141 Individual Income Tax 4 

0607 Productivity Software Applications 4 

1112 Introduction to Business 4 

TOTAL 

Sixth 0160 Intermediate Accounting 3 4 

Quarter 0609 Introduction to Spreadsheets 4 

8111 Business Communications 4 

Elective 3 

TOTAL 

Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 

Electives may be chosen from a wide variety of business 
courses. 



34 



Business and Management (BAM) 

The business and management program is structured to adapt 
to diverse interests in four optional areas — Small Business 
Management, Marketing Management, Physical Distribution 
Management and Manufacturing Management. 

Career path: Your choice of BAM option (Small Business 
Management, Marketing Management, Physical Distribution 
Management and Manufacturing Management), leads toward an 
Associate in Applied Science degree in Business and 
Management. 

Full-time or part-time: If a full-time student, usually only 3 cam- 
pus visits per week need be scheduled (three courses totaling 
12 credits; more courses optional). 

Day or evening: If day, most courses start at 9:00 a.m.; if even- 
ing, most courses start at 5:30 p.m. This choice also allows your 
schedule to be flexible during the quarter classes are offered, 
shifting day or evening. 

Degree objective or courses-only: Many "courses-only" are 
offered off campus in the surrounding area and counties. 

For those individuals who, at the outset, are uncertain of a 
career path, BAM provides for enrollment in basic courses, allow- 
ing time to defer firming of career choice. For those with a degree 
objective, BAM provides, in addition to choice of option, selec- 
tion of elective courses, allowing for refinement of career prepara- 
tion. For those wishing preparatory instruction, BAM draws on 
a full-time special-needs faculty for individualized concerns. 

BAM offers the business operational and managerial skills 
needed for 1) small business — self-employment as entrepreneur 
or generalist administrator, such as office manager; 2) manufac- 
turing — management trainee, first line supervisor, or advance- 
ment such as superintendent; 3) marketing — management 
trainee, buyer, salesman, retailer, agent, or advanced managerial 
functions; 4) physical distribution - traffic coordinator or PD/L 
supervisor. 



Business and Management 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 

Option 03 — Small Business Management 

Optional 09 — Industrial Management 

Option 10 — Physical Distribution Management 

Option 1 1 — Marketing Management 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 



OPTIONS CREDITS 



Degree Requirements, All Options — BAM 
(6 courses; 24 credits) 

1112 Introduction to Business 4 

0320 Management Principles 4 

0328 Laws Applied to Business 4 

0112 Accounting/Non-Majors 4 

0607 Productivity Software Applications 4 

*0609 Introduction to Spread Sheets 4 

*0610 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 
(May be substituted for either above) 

Degree Requirements 
(7 courses; 28 credits) 



1157 


Entrepreneurship 


03 


4 


0965 


Bus. Management/Manufacturing 


09 10 


4 


1161 


Business Management/ 








Marketing 


03 11 


4 


0321 


Office Administration 


03 


4 


0322 


Personnel Administration 


03 09 


4 


1148 


Insurance 


03 


4 


1002 


Manufacturing and Logistics 


09 


4 


0901 


Quality Control Concepts 


09 10 


4 


0904 


Statistical Concepts and Techniques 09 


4 


1001 


Distribution and Logistics 


10 11 


4 


1003 


Transportation Systems 


10 


4 


1004 


Warehousing 


10 


4 


1135 


Retailing 


11 


4 


1137 


Buying and Inventory Control 


09 11 


4 


1147 


Advertising 


11 


4 


1151 


Public Relations 


03 


4 


1115 


Sales Techniques 


10 11 


4 


1006 


Case Studies/Small Business 


03 


4 


1006 


Case Studies/Industrial 


09 


4 


1006 


Case Studies/Physical Distribution 


10 


4 


1006 


Case Studies/Marketing 


11 


4 


Degree Requirements, All Options — General 






(5 courses; 20 credits) 






8110 


Communications 




4 


8111 


Business Communications 




4 


8212 


Business Mathematics 




4 


8213 


Mathematics of Finance 




4 


8401 


Human Relations 




4 



Electives, All Options— Minimum 18 credits. (May be drawn from a 
broad, well defined selection, including but not limited to requirements 
of other options.) 

Total AAS Degree: 90 Credits 



35 



Computer Information Systems Technology 

We are living and working in the age of computers. Businesses, 
government agencies, and other organizations use computers 
extensively through a wide range of applications to provide routine 
service as well as solve the problems of business. 

The demand for computer specialists is particularly high in 
areas such as banking, insurance, hospitals, manufacturing, 
distributing firms, and government. In addition to entry level posi- 
tions of computer programmer, students may find jobs as com- 
puter operators. 

Ivy Tech's curriculum provides an integrated study of theory 
and practice of data processing for business, industry and other 
institutional use. At Ivy Tech College it is possible that only one 
or two of these courses will meet a student's educational objec- 
tives. Other students will want to pursue the College's Associate 
in Applied Science degree in Computer Information Systems 
Technology. This program will normally take the full-time student 
two years to complete and will prepare the graduate for the widest 
range of employment opportunities. 



Computer Information 
Systems Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE t 


» COURSE TITLE CR 


EDI 


First 


0510 


Fundamentals of Data Processing 


5 


Quarter 


1112 


Introduction to Business 


4 




0110 


Accounting Principles 1 


4 




81xx 


English Comp. 1 

TOTAL 


4 


Second 


82xx 


College Algebra 


4 


Quarter 


0120 


Accounting Principles 2 


4 




0522 


Logic & Documentation 


4 




05xx 


(Minor) 

TOTAL 


4 


Third 


0520 


Cobol Prog. Fund. 


5 


Quarter 


0531 


Operating Systems 


4 




82xx 


Computer Math & Logic 


4 




0610 


Intro. To Microcomputers 

TOTAL 


4 


Fourth 


0530 


Advanced Cobol Programming 


5 


Quarter 


0560 


Data Communications 


4 




81xx 


Technical Reporting 


4 




05xx 


(Minor) 

TOTAL 


4 


Fifth 


83xx 


Physical Science 


4 


Quarter 


0540 


Systems Analysis and Design 


4 




05xx 


(Minor) 


5 




05xx 


(Minor) 

TOTAL 


3 


Sixth 


05xx 


System Development with 




Quarter 




High Level Tools 


4 




8401 


Interpersonal Communications 


4 




05xx 


(Minor) 

TOTAL 


5 



Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



96 



36 



Culinary Arts Technology 

The Indiana Labor Market: Profile of Region 8 projects an 
increasing demand for cooks and food service workers in the 
greater Indianapolis area. Through Ivy Tech's comprehensive 
Culinary Arts program, you will become familiarized with the 
culinary styles of outstanding chefs and experienced instructors. 
Courses in food techniques and uses of many types of equipment 
culminate in the award of the Associate in Applied Science 
degree. 

You will participate in food preparation with special attention 
given to personal hygiene, food handling techniques, sanitation, 
and safety regulations. The Culinary Arts program covers food, 
beverage, volume food service, menu planning, international food 
preparation, classical cuisine, baking and pastries, meat cutting 
and fish and seafood preparation. An internship arrangement is 
required of local food service businesses. 

Ivy Tech's Culinary Arts program prepares you for entry-level 
jobs in the food service industry, ranging from counter service 
to sous chef. Many courses in the program develop managerial 
skills as well as technical skills. The program is affiliated with 
the Indiana Restaurant Association, American Hotel/Motel 
Association, American Culinary Federation and Chef's de Cuisine 
Association of Indiana. 



Culinary Arts 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 




C( 


)URSE i 


f COURSE TITLE CREDITS 


First 


3411 


Introduction to Culinary Arts 


2 


Quarter 


3413 


Introduction to Foods 


2 




3415 


Introductory Baking 


3 




3416 


Culinary Theory and Skills 








Development 


3 




8110 


Communications 


4 




3423 


Introductory Hot Food 








Preparation 


3 






TOTAL 




Second 


3417 


Pantry and Breakfast Cookery 


2 


Quarter 


3419 


Culinary Arts Externship 1 


3 




3421 


Nutrition 


3 




3455 


Menu Design 


4 




8401 


Human Relations 

TOTAL 


4 


Third 


3425 


Introduction to Table Service 


2 


Quarter 


3426 


Purchasing, Storeroom Procedures 








and Stewarding 


2 




3427 


Institutional Food Service Systems 


2 




3428 


Intermediate Hot Food 








Preparation 


2 




3429 


Culinary Arts Externship 2 


3 




8212 


Business Mathematics 

TOTAL 


4 


Fourth 


3430 


Meat Cutting, Kitchen 


3 


Quarter 


3439 


Culinary Arts Externship 3 


3 




3467 


Classical Pastries 


3 




0110 


Accounting Principles 1 


4 




3470 


Fish and Seafood Preparation 

TOTAL 


3 


Fifth 


3440 


International Food Planning 


3 


Quarter 


3442 


Buffet Catering 


2 




3459 


Classical Cuisine and 








Banquet Organization 


3 




3471 


Garde Manger 


3 




0913 


Technical Supervision 1 


3 




0753 


Motel/Motel Law 

TOTAL 


3 


Sixth 


3436 


Advanced Baking/Classical Pastry 


3 


Quarter 


3461 


A la Carte Food Preparation 








and Advanced Table Service 


3 




3462 


Advanced Food Preparation 








and Banquet Service 


3 




0923 


Technical Supervision 2 


3 




3437 


First Aid/Sanitation 

TOTAL 


2 



Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



37 



Distribution Management Technology 

Distribution Management Technology is an essential aspect 
to the manufacturing and marketing of goods, representing "the 
second largest employer in the United States." 

The five major components of the physical distribution system 
are material handling, warehousing, inventory control, order pro- 
cessing and customer service, and transportation (e.g. road, rail, 
water, air) carriers. 

Career opportunities are found with shippers (e.g. producers, 
wholesalers), carriers (e.g. railroads), and receivers (e.g. major 
retailers). Entry level positions could include assisting a line super- 
visor of one of the major physical distribution and logistics areas 
or assisting in a staff capacity in the coordination of several of 
their business activities. Advancement opportunities could 
include management. 



Distribution Management 
Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 



First 
Quarter 


1001 
0575 
8401 
0571 


Distribution and Logistics 
Topics in Data Processing 
Human Relations 
Survey of Business Data 
Processing 

TOTAL 


4 
4 

4 

3 


Second 
Quarter 


1002 
8110 
8212 


Manufacturing and Logistics 
Communications 
Business Mathematics 


4 
4 
4 



0323 Business Principles and 

Organization 3 

TOTAL 

Third 1003 The Transportation Systems 4 
Quarter 0603 Micro/Minicomputer Operation 

Systems 4 

0112 Accounting for Non-Majors 4 

0166 Introduction to Management 3 
TOTAL 

Fourth 1004 Warehousing and Inventory 
Quarter Control 4 

0607 Productivity Software 

Applications 4 

0322 Personnel Administration 4 

0122 Business Law 1 3 

TOTAL 

Fifth 1005 Order Processing and Customer 

Quarter Service 4 

8111 Business Communications 4 

8213 Mathematics of Finance 4 

xxxx Elective from Business Division 3 

TOTAL 

Sixth 1006 Case Studies in Distribution 

Quarter Management 4 

1007 Import/Export & Domestic 

Marketing 4 

0321 Office Administration 4 

xxxx Elective from Business Division 3 
TOTAL 
Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



38 



Hotel/Restaurant Management Technology 

The hospitality industry is the third largest in the nation. In 
Indiana it ranks as the second largest. 

Ivy Tech's curriculum, with guidance from the American Hotel 
and Motel Association, has recognized this trend and made the 
commitment to meet the present and projected needs of the 
hospitality industry. The courses are shaped by input from 
hotel/motel management experts and prospective employers. 
These constant reviews of industrial changes have indicated that 
hands-on training is in great demand and the College has struc- 
tured its offerings to reflect those changes. 

Ivy Tech endeavors to help employers and employees keep 
abreast of changes in the industry. Training in courses ranging 
from management and sales promotion to food and beverage pur- 
chasing form a solid base of theoretical and practical knowledge. 

To keep the hospitality industry running smoothly, industry 
needs qualified personnel experienced in such jobs as front office 
clerk, reservation manager, housekeeping supervisor, restaurant 
manager, purchasing agents and many other positions. 

This expanding, exciting program offers both an Associate in 
Applied Science degree and a Technical Certificate. A flexible 
class schedule helps train students in the hospitality industry's 
emerging needs and provides limitless career opportunities. 




Hotel/Restaurant Management 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 

Courses offered are held in conjunction with the American 
Hotel and Motel Association's Certification program from the 
educational institute. 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDI 

First 0711 Introduction to Hospitality 

Quarter Management 4 

0744 Sanitation 4 

3444 Introduction to Food Service 3 

8110 Communications 4 

TOTAL 

Second 0762 Supervisory Housekeeping 4 

Quarter 0712 Front Office Procedures 4 

8212 Business Mathematics 4 
8401 Human Relations 4 

TOTAL 

Third 0760 Hotel/Motel Maintenance 1 3 
Quarter 0742 Food and Beverage Purchasing 

and Control 4 
0733 Food and Beverage Management 

and Service 4 

0913 Techniques of Supervision I 3 
TOTAL 

Fourth 0110 Accounting Principles 1 4 

Quarter 0763 HotelMotel Maintenance 2 3 

0753 Hotel/Motel Law 3 

0923 Techniques of Supervision 2 3 

8111 Business Communications 4 

TOTAL 

Fifth 0723 Convention Management 3 

Quarter 0510 Fundamentals of Data Processing 5 

0752 Sales Promotion 4 

8213 Math of Finance 4 

TOTAL 

Sixth 8113 Oral Communications 4 

Quarter 0751 Food and Beverage Cost Control 4 

xxxx Electives 4 
TOTAL 
Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



Food Service 

Technical Certificate 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 



First 
Quarter 


0110 
0711 
0733 


Accounting Principles 1 
Hospitality Management 
Food and Beverage Management 
and Service 


4 
4 

4 




0751 


Food and Beverage Cost Control 
Planning and Procedures 

TOTAL 


4 


Second 


0753 


Hotel/Motel Law 


3 


Quarter 


0913 
3411 
3413 


Techniques of Supervision 1 
Culinary Arts 
Introduction to Foods 


3 
2 
2 




3416 
3421 


Culinary Theory and Skills 

Development 
Nutrition 

TOTAL 


3 
3 


Third 
Quarter 


3422 
3425 


Volume Food Preparation 
Table Service 


5 
2 




3426 


Purchasing, Storeroom Procedures 






3428 


and Stewarding 
Intermediate Hot Food 


2 




3442 
3455 


Preparation 
Buffet Catering 
Menu Design 

TOTAL 


2 
2 
4 


Fourth 
Quarter 


3461 


A la Carte Food Preparation 
and Advanced Table Service 


3 




3474 


First Aid/Sanitation 


2 




8110 


Communications 


4 




8401 


Human Relations 

TOTAL 


4 



Total Technical Certificate Credits 



62 



39 



Information/Data Management Technology 

The program is a user-oriented program which utilizes 
microcomputer technology within the modern automated office 
setting. Demand for employees with computer and business skills 
is particularly high in small and medium-sized firms which create, 
transmit, and control information by using microcomputers 
(independent or network configurations) as a management tool. 

Office automation systems allow for the productive integration 
of combinations of several functionally related computerized sub- 
systems such as word processing, spread sheeting, BASIC pro- 
gramming, electronic mail systems, electronic filing, graphics 
generation, and telecommunications. These systems may be 
stand-alone, shared logic, distributed or integrated. 

The Associate in Applied Science degree will normally take a 
full-time student approximately two years to complete. 



Information/Data Management Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

First 0510 Data Processing Fundamentals 5 

Quarter 0610 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

8110 Communications 4 
0323 Business Principles and 

Organization 3 

TOTAL 15 



Second 


8111 


Business Communications 


4 




Quarter 


8212 


Business Mathematics 


4 






0522 


Computer Logic & Documentation 4 






0603 


Micro/Minicomputer 
Operating Systems 

TOTAL 


4 


16 


Third 


0110 


Accounting Principles 1 


4 




Quarter 


8113 


Oral Communications 


4 






0607 


Productivity Software Applications 


4 






8401 


Human Relations 

TOTAL 


4 


16 


Fourth 


0120 


Accounting Principles 2 


4 




Quarter 


0609 


Electronic Spreadsheets 


4 






0512 


BASIC Language Programming 


5 






0608 


Microcomputer Word Processing 
TOTAL 


4 


17 


Fifth 


0567 


Introduction to Database 






Quarter 




Management 


4 






0560 


Data Communications 
Elective Course(s) 

TOTAL 


4 


8 + 


Sixth 


0605 


Microcomputer Database Design 






Quarter 




& Management 


4 






0540 


Systems Analysis and Design 


4 






0601 


Office Automation 
Elective Course(s) 

TOTAL 


3 


11 + 
81 + 



Students may elect to pursue a related minor as part of their 
Associate degree. Requirements for selected minors offered are 
available through the Program Chairperson. 



Information/Data Management Technology 

Technical Certificate 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

First 0510 Data Processing Fundamentals 5 

Quarter 0610 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

8110 Communications 4 

TOTAL 12 



Second 
Quarter 



8111 
0607 



0603 



8212 



Third 0512 

Quarter 0608 

0609 

0110 



Business Communications 4 
Productivity Software 

Applications 4 
Micro/Minicomputer Operating 

Systems 4 

Business Math 4 
TOTAL 

BASIC Language Programming 5 

Microcomputer Word Processing 4 

Electronic Spreadsheets 4 

Accounting Principles 1 4 
TOTAL 



40 



Paralegal Technology 

The demand for trained paralegals is increasing. The number 
of job opportunities is projected to increase significantly by the 
mid 1990s according to employment analysts. Ivy Tech recognizes 
this demand and has made the commitment to meet the present 
and projected needs of the legal profession. The curriculum is 
shaped by input from attorneys and other professionals in the 
legal field. This input then is utilized to design a curriculum which 
will produce trained and knowledgeable paralegals. 

As a trained specialist, your duties can range from assisting 
in complicated legal research to scheduling court appearances. 
Your training may provide a wide variety of job opportunities and 
mobility. Classroom lectures in such areas as civil procedure, 
research and writing, wills and trusts, combined with an elective 
internship, will allow you to prepare in just two years for an ex- 
citing job as a paralegal. 

If you are interested in a career with above-average entry-level 
pay, and if you are motivated to enter an exciting field which 
requires self-discipline and a desire to succeed, Ivy Tech's two- 
year, Associate Degree program is for you! 



Paralegal Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

First 8110 Communications 4 

Quarter 8212 Business Mathematics 4 

8401 Human Relations 4 

xxxx Science Elective 4 

TOTAL 16 

Second 13xx Office Management & Ethics 4 

Quarter 1302 Legal Research & Writing 4 

(8110-Prerequisite) 

8111 Business Communications 4 

8213 Mathematics of Finance 4 

TOTAL 16 

Third 1303 Civil Procedure 4 

Quarter 0112 Accounting for Non-Majors 4 

1309 Torts 4 

13xx Business Associations 4 

TOTAL 16 

Fourth 1319 Claims Investigation 4 

Quarter 1318 Contracts & Commercial Law 4 

1306 Criminal Law & Procedures* 4 

1308 Property Law 4 

TOTAL 16 

Fifth 0610 Intro to Microcomputers 3 

Quarter 1305 Family Law 4 

1316 Litigation 4 

TOTAL 11 

Sixth 1307 Wills, Trusts & Probate 4 

Quarter 13xx Appellate Procedure** 4 

13xx Computers in the Law Office*** 4 

TOTAL 12 

Seventh 1314 Bankruptcy Law 4 

Quarter EEEE Elective 4*** 

EEEE Elective 4*** 

EEEE Elective 4*** 

TOTAL 16 

Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 103 

NOTE: Classes which require no prerequisite may be taken in 
any order. 

♦(Prerequisite 1303) 
"(Prerequisite 1303 and 1306) 
***flPrerequisite 0610 and 1302) 



41 



Quality Control Technology 

In today's world, quality control is an integral and essential part 
of every business operation. 

Ivy Tech's curriculum reflects this requirement and has made 
a commitment to meet the projected needs of business and 
industry. Courses are routinely shaped by input from quality con- 
trol technician experts and prospective employers. 

Ivy Tech endeavors to help employers and employees adapt 
to quality control standards. Our program is organized to prepare 
individuals to enter the field or to provide quality control employed 
persons the opportunity to upgrade and certify skills. 

To keep manufacturing, service and other industries operating 
at optimum levels, qualified quality control technicians who have 
the skills to work with engineering and management teams to 
improve product quality and assure quality program effectiveness 
are needed. 

The Associate in Applied Science degree program can lead you 
to a job opportunity in a variety of production fields, including 
agricultural/biological, chemical and industrial engineering. 
Graduates are eligible to take the American Society of Quality 
Control examination which leads to industry certification as a 
Quality Control Technician. 



Quality Control 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE § COURSE TITLE CREDITS 




First 


0901 


Quality Control Concepts 






Quarter 




and Techniques 1 


4 






8203 


Technical Math 1 


4 






0913 


Techniques of Supervision 1 


3 






8110 


Communications 

TOTAL 


4 


15 


Second 


0902 


Quality Control Concepts 






Quarter 




and Techniques 2 


4 






8204 


Technical Math 2 


4 






0909 


Mechanical Metrology 


4 






8111 


Business Communications 

TOTAL 


4 


16 


Third 


0903 


QC Engineering Principles 






Quarter 




and Techniques 


4 






8210 


Statistics 


3 






0915 


Electrical Metrology 


4 






8401 


Human Relations 

TOTAL 


4 


15 


Fourth 


0904 


Statistical Concepts 






Quarter 




and Techniques 


4 






0575 


Topics in Data Processing 


4 






8301 


Physical Science 


3 






0916 


Procurement Quality Control 

TOTAL 


4 


15 


Fifth 


0905 


QC Engineering Theory 






Quarter 




and Applications 


4 






0907 


Reliability Objectives 


4 






0967 


Drafting and Manufacturing 
Standards 


3 






0908 


Introduction to Non-Destructive 
Tests 

TOTAL 


4 


15 


Sixth 


0917 


Reliability Techniques 


4 




Quarter 


9414 
0607 


Blueprint Reading 1 
Productivity Software 
Applications 


3 
4 






xxxx 


Elective 

TOTAL 


3 


14 


Total Associate 


in Applied Science Degree Credits 




90 



Quality Control Associate in Applied Science degree electives 
may be chosen from one of the following areas of 
concentration: 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

0323 Business Principles and Organization 3 

0609 Electronic Spreadsheets 4 

0923 Techniques of Supervision 2 3 

0963 Manufacturing Processes I 3 

0982 Management by Objectives 3 

0983 Time Management 3 
7548 Basic Geometric Dimensioning and 

Tolerance 3 



42 



Secretarial Sciences 

The secretary is a versatile person who can perform a wide 
variety of duties. In addition to dictation and typing, many 
secretaries are found filing, routing mail and answering 
telephones. In more responsible positions, the administrative 
secretary may be called on to answer letters, do statistical 
research, and write reports. 

The secretary will find entry-level employment opportunities 
in almost every facet of business, industry, government, and 
public or private non-profit agencies. Some will find it profitable 
to pursue a career as an administrative secretary through Ivy 
Tech's Associate in Applied Science degree Program in 
Secretarial-Administrative. 

This program will take a full-time student approximately two 
years to complete. 



Secretarial Administrative 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 



First 


1210 


Shorthand 1 


Quarter 


1212 


Typewriting 1 




8110 


Communications 




0323 


Business Principles and 
Organization 

TOTAL 


Second 


1220 


Shorthand 2 


Quarter 


1222 


Typewriting 2 




8111 


Business Communications 




xxxx 


Elective 

TOTAL 



Third 1230 Shorthand 3 

Quarter 1232 Typewriting 3 

8212 Business Mathematics 

1224 Records Management 



TOTAL 



Fourth 0110 Accounting Principles 1 

Quarter 1242 Typewriting 4 

8113 Oral Communications 

1236 Office Calculating Machines 1 



Fifth 8401 

Quarter 0122 

1255 

1256 

1267 



TOTAL 

Human Relations 

Business Law 1 

Word Processing Fundamentals 

Module 1 
Word Processing Operations 
Machine Dictation and 

Transcription 

TOTAL 



Sixth 1254 Word Processing Concepts 2 

Quarter 1241 Clerical Office Procedures 3 

1262 Typewriting 5 4 

0143 Business Law 2 3 

xxxx Elective 4 

TOTAL 16 

Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 92 

(A Technical Certificate in Secretarial Administration and 
Word Processing is also offered.) 

1255 Module I and 1256 Corequisites 

Administrative Secretarial Associate degree electives may be 
chosen from one of the following areas of concentration: 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

Administrative Secretarial Electives: 

1114 Marketing 1 4 

0913 Techniques of Supervision 1 3 

1226 Data Entry 4 

1240 Shorthand 4 4 

1257 Word Processing Applications 4 

1275 Word Processing Files Management 4 

8501 Field Study/Co-op Education 6 

1270 Introduction to Typewriting 

(Non-Majors)* 3 

*1270 Introduction to Typewriting may be necessary for some 
students who have had no previous keyboard training, but is 
not included in the total hours required for graduation. 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

Microcomputer Electives: 

0608 Microcomputer Word Processing 4 
0607 Productivity Software Applications 4 

0609 Electronic Spreadsheets 4 
8501 Field Study/Co-op Education 5 



43 



Secretarial— Medical Minor 

In addition to the usual secretarial duties, the medical secretary 
serves as a liaison between the doctor and patient and is impor- 
tant in building and maintaining good relations with the patients. 
Entry level positions are found in doctors' offices, clinics, 
hospitals, and other health related organizations. 

Many secretaries will find that they can upgrade their job skills 
by taking just a course or two. Other students will find that they 
can open the door to an entirely new career as a medical secretary 
by pursuing Ivy Tech's Technical Certificate in Secretarial-Medical. 
This program will take the full-time student approximately one 
year to complete. Still other students will find it beneficial to pur- 
sue courses from the College's Secretarial-Administrative Program 
along with their Secretarial-Medical courses. 



Medical Secretary 

Technical Certificate 



First 
Quarter 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 

1212 Typewriting 1 

8401 Human Relations 

8212 Business Mathematics 

1224 Records Management 



TOTAL 



Second 
Quarter 



Third 
Quarter 



3722 Medical Typewriting 1 

8110 Communications 
3721 Medical Office Procedures ■! 
xxxx Elective 4 

TOTAL 15 

3732 Medical Office Communications 4 

3713 Medical Office Bookkeeping 4 
0323 Business Principles and 

Organization 3 

xxxx Elective 3 

TOTAL 15 

Fourth 9355 Medical Terminology 2 

Quarter 3743 Machine Transcription Medical 1 3 

8111 Business Communications 4 
1236 Office Calculating Machines 1 3 
xxxx Elective 4 

TOTAL _15 

Total Technical Certificate Credits 60 

1255 Module 1 and 1256 Corequisites 

Medical Secretary electives may be chosen from the following areas of 
concentration: 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

1255 Word Processing Fundamentals 

Module 1 & 2 4 

1256 Word Processing Operations 4 

1257 Word Processing Applications 4 
1275 Word Processing Files Management 4 
3769 Medical Assistance Administrative 

Externship 4 

3771 Medical Insurance 3 

9350 Medical Law and Ethics 2 

0608 Microcomputer Word Processing 4 

1270 Introduction to Typewriting 

(Non-Majors)* 3 

•1270 Introduction to Typewriting may be necessary for some 

students who have had no previous keyboard training, but is 
not included in the total hours required for graduation. 



Secretarial — Word Processing 

Technical Certificate 



COURSE tt COURSE TITLE 



First 


1212 


Typewriting 1 


4 




Quarter 


8110 


Communications 


4 






8212 


Business Mathematics 


4 






0323 


Business Principles and 
Organization 

TOTAL 


3 


15 


Second 


1222 


Typewriting 2 


4 




Quarter 


8111 

1255 


Business Communications 
Word Processing Fundamentals 
Module 1 & 2 


4 

4 






1256 


Word Processing Operations 

TOTAL 


4 


16 


Third 


1232 


Typewriting 3 


4 




Quarter 


0110 


Accounting Principles 1 


4 






1257 


Word Processing Applications 


4 






xxxx 


Elective 

TOTAL 


3 


15 


Fourth 


1275 


Word Processing Files 






Quarter 




Management 


4 






1242 


Typewriting 4 


4 






8113 


Oral Communications 


4 




Total Te 


1224 
chnical 


Records Management 

TOTAL 

Certificate Credits 


3 


15 
61 



1255 Module I and 1256 Corequisites 

Word Processing Technical Certificate electives may be chosen 

from one of the following: 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 


CREDITS 


1210 Shorthand 1 


4 


1220 Shorthand 2 


4 


1236 Office Calculating Machines 1 


3 


1262 Typewriting V 


4 


0607 Productivity Software Applications 


4 


0609 Electronic Spreadsheets 


4 


0613 Integrated Business Software 


4 


0510 Data Processing Fundamentals 


5 



1270 



3 



Introduction Typewriting (Non-Majors)* 

*1270, Introduction to Typewriting may be necessary for some 
students who have had no previous keyboard training, but is 
not included in the total hours required for graduation. 



44 



Division of 
Human Services and 
Health Technologies 



Recognizing the increasing employment 
opportunities in the expanding fields of human 
social and health services, the College's Division 
of Human Services and Health Technologies 
prepares students to become competent members 
of a human services or health care team. Classroom, 
laboratory, and clinical experiences prepare students 
to serve in medical facilities, child care centers, 
and numerous social service or health care settings. 
Graduates and selected course completers can look 
toward careers in various social and health service 
fields including substance abuse, gerontology and 
other para-professional opportunities. 



45 



Child Care Technology 

The need for trained workers in child care is high and is 
expected to continue to grow as parents, grandparents and 
guardians remain in the work force. The present economic 
conditions indicate there will be an on-going need for child care 
professionals to work in day care centers, preschool facilities as 
well as public and private homes for children. Ivy Tech's Child 
Care Technology program is designed to equip graduates with 
the skills, knowledge and understanding of early childhood 
development, parent-child relations and the handling of groups 
of young children. 

Graduates of this program would meet job entry requirements 
for employment in public or private homes for children, day care 
centers, nursery schools, or schools for special children. Child 
Care Technology graduates earn a Technical Certificate after com- 
pleting three-quarters, full-time. Students may also attend on a 
part-time basis. 



Child Care Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 


First 


2601 


Introduction to Child Care 


4 


Quarter 


8110 


Communications 


4 




8401 


Human Relations 


4 




2641 


Creative Movements 

TOTAL 


4 


Second 


2651 


Language Arts 


4 


Quarter 


2626 


Science and Social Studies for 








Preschool Children 


4 




2624 


Participation 1 


4 




2627 


Seminar 1 


2 




0323 


Business Principles and 








Organization 


3 






TOTAL 




Third 


2610 


Child Growth and Development 


4 


Quarter 


2633 


Community Resources 


4 




2631 


Participation 2 


4 




2637 


Seminar 2 

TOTAL 


2 


Fourth 


2642 


Nutrition and Meal Planning 


4 


Quarter 


2625 


Legal Aspects 


3 




2645 


Participation 3 


4 




2647 


Seminar 3 


2 




2643 


Preschool Art 

TOTAL 


4 


Fifth 


2655 


Bookkeeping 


4 


Quarter 


2612 


Childhood Health 


3 




2654 


Participation 4 


4 




2657 


Seminar 4 


2 




2660 


Preschool Music 

TOTAL 


4 


Sixth 


2623 


Cognitive and Creative Activities 


3 


Quarter 


2661 


Management Techniques 


4 




2663 


Audiovisual Materials 








and Methods 


4 




2665 


Participation 5 


4 




2667 


Seminar 5 

TOTAL 


2 



Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



46 



Health Care Administration 

As the population of the elderly increases, more extended-care 
facilities will be needed. Competent and qualified administrators 
to head these long-term care facilities will also be in greater 
demand. At Ivy Tech, we offer an Associate in Applied Science 
degree in health care administration. Whether you seek to upgrade 
your present skill as an employed administrator or desire to enter 
the field in an entry-level position, consider Ivy Tech's program 
of study. 

Preparing specific courses geared to the industry, Ivy Tech's 
health care administration curriculum is shaped by input from 
health care professionals. Providing quality health care 
environments through knowledgeable, well-qualified 
administrative personnel is Ivy Tech's commitment. With an 
Associate in Applied Science degree, administrators can enhance 
their present skills and knowledge. 

Ivy Tech is also in the process of receiving approval by the 
Indiana State Board of Registration and Education for Health 
Facility Administrators to meet the 200-contact-hour training 
program prerequisite for licensure as a health facility 
administrator. 



Health Care Administration 
Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 

First 8110 Communications 

Quarter 8401 Human Relations 

Fall 8212 Business Mathematics 

xxxx Elective 



CREDITS 

4 



Second 
Quarter 
Winter 



Third 

Quarter 

Spring 



Fourth 
Quarter 

Fall 



TOTAL 



4052 
8111 
8213 
4055 

0112 
4053 
8113 
4040 

1114 
0166 
2761 
llxx 



16 



Psychology of Aging 4 

Business Communications 4 

Mathematics of Finance 4 

Nursing Home Administration 4 

TOTAL 16 



Accounting for Non-Majors 4 

Physiology of Aging 4 

Oral Communications 4 

Basic Health Sciences 4 

TOTAL 16 

Marketing 1 4 

Management 3 

Interdisciplinary Team 4 

Long Term Care Internship 5 

TOTAL 16 

Fifth 0322 Personnel Administration 4 

Quarter 0942 Purchasing & Inventory Control 4 

Winter 4041 Directed Practice 1 6 

TOTAL 14 

Sixth 4051 Directed Practice 2 4 

Quarter 4061 Directed Practice 3 4 

Spring 4065 Human Services Topical Seminar 4 

TOTAL 12 

Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 90 



47 



Human Services 

The field of Human Services encompasses many different 
populations and settings as we move toward a more service- 
oriented society. Career opportunities have expanded both in the 
public and the private sector. 

As a Human Services professional, you will reach out to 
individuals, to families, and to communities. The Human Services 
program gives you the broad understanding to help others meet 
their psychological, social, and environmental needs. We prepare 
you to be a Human Services Generalist with the option to 
specialize in the areas of Substance Abuse or Gerontology. You 
will be able to work in a variety of settings such as community 
centers, group homes, alcoholism centers, nursing homes, etc. 
You can be the link to help others learn to help themselves. 

Everyone in the program takes a core of Human Services 
courses since many of the same skills are needed to work in a 
variety of settings. The Generalist Minor gives you the most flex- 
ibility to choose some of your coursework. After completing this 
program, you could have a job title such as Case Aid, Communi- 
ty Outreach Worker, Volunteer Coordinator, Residential 
Houseparent, etc. 

The Substance Abuse Minor prepares you for work in the field 
of addictions. The specialized courses in substance abuse are 
endorsed by the Indiana Counselors Association on Alcohol and 
Drug Abuse (ICAADA). The course work gives you a solid foun- 
dation to take the basic state certification examination and to seek 
employment as a substance abuse counselor. 

The Gerontology Minor focuses on working with older adults, 
a population that is rapidly increasing. Two of the courses offered 
in the program meet the state requirements to be an Activity Direc- 
tor or Social Services Director in a nursing home. Other job 
opportunities could be in the areas of Adult Day Care or Senior 
Citizens Programs. 



Human Services 
Generalist 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 


First 


4010 


Human Services 1 


4 


Quarter 


8110 


Communications 


4 




8401 


Human Relations 


4 




8402 


Psychology 

TOTAL 


4 


Second 


4005 


Motivation and Learning 


4 


Quarter 


4062 


Introduction to Community 








Organizations 


4 




8117 


Effective Listening 


2 




9359 


Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 


1 




8113 


Oral Communications 

TOTAL 


4 



Third 4032 Helping Relationship Techniques 4 

Quarter 4041 Directed Practice 1 6 

xxxx Elective 4 
TOTAL 

Fourth Summer Quarter — taking courses 
Quarter optional 

Fifth 4020 Human Services 2 3 

Quarter 4034 Interviewing and Counseling 4 

8405 Social Problems 4 

xxxx Elective 4 

TOTAL 

Sixth 4050 Group Process and Skills 4 

Quarter 4051 Directed Practice 2 4 

8111 Business Communications 4 

xxxx Elective 4 

TOTAL 

Seventh 0913 Techniques of Supervision 1 3 

Quarter 4060 Program Planning and Evaluation 4 

4061 Directed Practice 3 4 

xxxx Elective 3 







TOTAL 


14 


Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 


90 


Human Services Associate in Applied Science Degree electives 


may be chosen from the following areas 


of concentration: 


COURSE # 


COURSE TITLE 




CREDITS 


0575 


Topics in Data Processing 




4 


2610 


Growth and Development 




4 


1157 


Entrepreneurship 




3 


4006 


Families 




3 


4022 


Substance Abuse in Society 




4 


4052 


Psychology of Aging 




4 


4066 


Activity Directors Course 




4 


4067 


Social Services in Extended Care 


4 



48 



Human Services 
Substance Abuse Minor 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE COURSE TITLE 

First 4010 Human Services 1 

Quarter 8110 Communications 

8401 Human Relations 

8402 Psychology 



CREDITS 

4 
4 
4 
4 



TOTAL 



Second 4005 Motivation and Learning 
Quarter 4022 Substance Abuse in Society 
4062 Introduction to Community 

Organizations 
8117 Effective Listening 
9359 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 
TOTAL 



Third 


4023 


Problems of Substance Abuse 


Quarter 


4032 


Helping Relationship Techniques 




4041 


Directed Practice 1 

TOTAL 


Fourth 


Summer Quarter — taking courses 


Quarter 


optional 


Fifth 


4020 


Human Services 2 


Quarter 


4034 


Interviewing and Counseling 




8111 


Business Communication 




8113 


Oral Communications 

TOTAL 


Sixth 


4024 


Treatment of Substance Abuse 


Quarter 


4050 


Group Process and Skills 




4051 


Directed Practice 2 




8405 


Social Problems 

TOTAL 


Seventh 


4060 


Program Planning and Evaluation 


Quarter 


4026 


Counseling with Substance Abuse 




4061 


Directed Practice 3 




4065 


Human Services Topical Seminar 
TOTAL 


Total Associate i 


in Applied Science Degree 


(Substance Abuse Minor) Credits 



Human Services 
Gerontology Minor 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

First 4010 Human Services 1 4 

Quarter 8110 Communications 4 

8401 Human Relations 4 

8402 Applied Behavioral Psychology 4 

TOTAL 16 

Second 4005 Motivation and Learning 4 

Quarter 4052 Psychology of Aging 4 

4062 Introduction to Community 

Organizations 4 

8117 Effective Listening 2 

9359 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 1 

TOTAL 15 

Third 4032 Helping Relationship Techniques 4 

Quarter 4041 Directed Practice 1 6 

4053 Psysiology of Aging 4 

TOTAL 14 

Fourth Summer Quarter — taking courses 
Quarter optional 

Fifth 4020 Human Services 2 3 

Quarter 4034 Interviewing and Counseling 4 

8111 Business Communication 4 

xxxx Elective 4 

TOTAL 15 

Sixth 4050 Group Process and Skills 4 

Quarter 4051 Directed Practice 2 4 

8405 Social Problems 4 

xxxx Elective 3 

TOTAL 15 

Seventh 4060 Program Planning and Evaluation 4 

Quarter 4061 Directed Practice 3 4 

xxxx Elective 4 

8113 Oral Communications 4 

TOTAL 16 

Total Associate in Applied Science Degree 91 

(Gerontology Minor) Credits 

Human Services Associate in Applied Science Degree electives 
may be chosen from several areas of concentration. 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

4006 Families in American Culture 3 

4065 Human Services Topical Seminar 1-4 
4067 Social Services in Extended Care 4 

4066 Activity Directors Course 4 
0913 Techniques of Supervision 3 



49 



Medical Assistant 

Medical assistants are multi-skilled practitioners who are 
qualified to provide supportive health care services under the 
supervision of a physician. They assist with patient care, execute 
administrative and clinical procedures, and often perform 
managerial and supervisory functions. Competence in the field 
requires that medical assistants communicate effectively, adhere 
to ethical and legal standards of medical practice, recognize and 
respond to emergencies, and demonstrate professional 
characteristics. Medical assistants handle most of the paper work 
in the physician's office. They make appointments, maintain 
medical and financial records, process insurance claims, and 
evaluate computerized data. They also order medical supplies and 
prepare patients for examination. In addition, they may assist the 
physician in minor surgery, perform simple lab tests, assess vital 
signs, and operate an electrocardiogram or diathermy machine. 

The program is accredited by the American Association of 
Medical Assistants (AAMA) in collaboration with the American 
Medical Association's (AMA) Committee on Allied Health Educa- 
tion and Accreditation (CAHEA). 

Students are prepared for the national examination required 
for certification as a medical assistant (CMA). 

Employment opportunities for well-trained medical assistants 
may be found in physicians' offices, medical clinics, hospitals, 
nursing homes, health insurance industry offices, and in other 
health care agencies. 



Medical Assistant 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 



First 
Quarter 



Second 
Quarter 



1212 Typewriting 1 
3721 Medical Office Procedures/ 
Administrative 

9353 Anatomy and Physiology 1 

9355 Medical Terminology 
9359 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 

TOTAL 

3712 Medical Office Procedures 1 

3713 Medical Office Bookkeeping 
3719 Medical Typewriting 1 
3766 First Aid/Emergency Care 

9354 Anatomy and Physiology 2 

TOTAL 

Third 3730 Medical Laboratory Techniques 

Quarter 3732 Medical Office Communications 

3742 Medical Office Procedures 2 
3771 Medical Insurance 

9310 Pharmacology 

TOTAL 

Fourth 3729 Medical Assistant Clinical 

Quarter Externship 

3743 Machine Transcription Medical 1 
3769 Medical Assistant Administrative 

Externship 
8401 Human Relations 
9350 Medical Law and Ethics 

TOTAL 

Fifth 0575 Topics in Data Processing 
Quarter 3744 Machine Transcription Medical 2 
4406 Holistic Approach to Health 
8111 Business Communications 
8308 General Microbiology 

TOTAL 

Sixth 3752 Medical Office Procedures 

Quarter Clinical 3 

3761 Community Health 

3763 Medical Office Management 

9356 Disease Conditions 
xxxx Elective 

TOTAL 
Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



14 
101 



Medical Assistant 

Technical Certificate 



First 1212 

Quarter 3721 

9353 
9355 
9359 

Second 3712 

Quarter 3713 

3719 

3766 

9354 

Third 3730 

Quarter 3732 

3742 

3771 

9310 



Fourth 
Quarter 



3729 



3743 
3769 



8401 
9350 



COURSE TITLE CREDr 

Typewriting 1 4 
Medical Office Procedures/ 

Administrative 4 

Anatomy and Physiology 1 4 

Medical Terminology 4 

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 1 

TOTAL 

Medical Office Procedures 1 4 

Medical Office Bookkeeping 4 

Medical Typewriting 1 3 

First Aid/Emergency Care 3 

Anatomy and Physiology 2 4 
TOTAL 

Medical Laboratory Techniques 4 

Medical Office Communications 4 

Medical Office Procedures 2 4 

Medical Insurance 3 

Pharmacology 4 
TOTAL 

Medical Assistant Clinical 

Externship 4 

Machine Transcription Medical 1 3 
Medical Assistant Administrative 

Externship 4 

Human Relations 4 

Medical Law and Ethics 2 
TOTAL 



Total Technical Certificate Credits 



50 



Practical Nursing 

Licensed Practical Nurses are essential members of the nursing 
profession responsible for numerous nursing functions. A partial 
list of functions include patient hygiene, taking blood pressures, 
performing therapeutic measures, administering medications, 
monitoring patients receiving intravenous therapy and blood 
transfusions, and recording patient data The employment outlook 
for practical nurses is expected to be very good during the next 
few years. Employment is available in hospitals, nursing homes, 
private duty, and some public health agencies. 

The Practical Nursing program provides instruction for initial 
employment in the nursing field. The program meets the 
requirements of the Indiana State Board of Nurses' Registration 
on Education and prepares candidates for the examination 
required for licensure as a practical nurse in Indiana. Graduates 
of the one-year program are awarded a Technical Certificate. 

In the Practical Nursing Program, all courses must be at "C" 
grade level or above. 



Practical Nursing 

Technical Certificate 



COURSE tt COURSE TITLE CREDITS 


First 


4401 


Foundation of Nursing 


3 


Quarter 


4402 


Collecting, Reporting and 








Recording Patient Data 


3 




4403 


Therapeutic Measures 


3 




4406 


Holistic Approach to Health 


3 




4407 


Nutrition 


2 




9310 


Pharmacology 


2 




9353 


Anatomy and Physiology 1 


4 




4435 


Vocational Issues and Trends 

TOTAL 


1 


Second 


9354 


Anatomy and Physiology 2 


4 


Quarter 


9310 


Pharmacology 


4 




4437 


Dermatologic and E.E.N.T. 
Nursing 


1 




4403 


Therapeutic Measures 


3 




4438 


Gerontology 


3 




4439 


Geriatric Clinical Nursing 

TOTAL 


3 


Third 


4423 


Medical Surgical Clinical 




Quarter 




Nursing 1 


6 




4432 


Medical Surgical Clinical 








Nursing 2 


3 




4425 


Musculoskeletal and Neurological 








Nursing 


2 




4415 


Cardiovascular Nursing 


2 




4419 


Respiratory Nursing 


2 




4416 


Gastrointestinal Nursing 


2 




4412 


Endocrine Nursing 

TOTAL 


2 


Fourth 


4432 


Medical Surgical Clinical 




Quarter 




Nursing 2 


4 




4463 


Maternal/Child Clinical Nursing 


4 




4455 


Maternal/Child Health Nursing 


5 




4426 


Genitourinary 


2 




4435 


Vocational Issues and Trends 

TOTAL 


1 



Total Technical Certificate Credits 



51 



Radiologic Technology 

A registered radiologic technologist, an integral part of the allied 
health care team will assist in the diagnosis and treatment of 
injuries and disease, by providing radiologists and other medical 
practitioners with high quality images. 

The program is two years in length and the quarters run con- 
secutively. A typical week consist of classes two days per week 
and hospital experience three days per week. During the two year 
period, students in the program will follow a set curriculum. Each 
student will have the opportunity to acquire sufficient hospital 
experience for learning and demonstration of clinical competence. 

Successful completion of the program will qualify the student 
for eligibility to take the American Registry of Radiologic 
Technologists examination. Completion of the program will also 
enable the graduate to apply for the Indiana State Board of Health 
Certificate. 

Students will be introduced to the x-ray field during the first 
quarter. Subsequent courses will introduce and cover in depth 
many subject areas such as: radiographic positioning, principles 
of exposure, radiation protection, radiation physics and biology, 
introduction to computers, nursing procedures, communications 
and human relations. 

In addition to the above mentioned courses, during clinical train- 
ing students will learn to operate many types of x-ray equipment, 
film processors, darkroom equipment, portable x-ray machines, 
x-ray related devices, as well as the meaning of patient care, pro- 
fessionalism and responsibility. 

Currently there is a nationwide shortage of radiologic 
technologists. Students will be entering a wide open job market. 



Radiologic Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE § COURSE TITLE 



First 
Quarter 



4620 
9305 

9353 
9350 
9355 



Second 4609 

Quarter 4623 

4624 

9354 



Orientation to X-Ray 
Technical Math for Health 

Occupations 
Anatomy and Physiology 1 
Medical Law and Ethics 
Medical Terminology 

TOTAL 

Nursing Procedures for X-Ray 
X-Ray Clinical Education 1 
Radiographic Positioning 1 
Anatomy and Physiology 2 

TOTAL 

Third 0575 Computer Programming for 

Quarter Technicians 

4613 Radiation Physics 1 
4633 Radiographic Positioning 2 
4638 X-Ray Clinical Education 2 

TOTAL 

Fourth 4625 Radiographic Exposure 1 
Quarter 4643 Radiographic Positioning 3 

4648 X-Ray Clinical Education 3 

8110 Communications 

9359 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 
TOTAL 

Fifth 4634 Radiographic Exposure 2 
Quarter 4650 Radiographic Positioning 4 

4655 X-Ray Clinical Education 4 

xxxx Elective 

TOTAL 

Sixth 4642 Imaging Techniques 
Quarter 4668 X-Ray Clinical Education 5 

9356 Disease Conditions 

9643 EKG 

TOTAL 



13 



Seventh 4672 Radiobiology 3 

Quarter 4678 X-Ray Clinical Education 6 6 

4699 Radiographic Quality Assurance 3 

TOTAL 12 

Eighth 4685 General Exam Review 4 

Quarter 4688 X-Ray Clinical Education 7 6 

8401 Human Relations 4 

TOTAL 14 

Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 109 



52 



Respiratory Care Practitioner 

These highly skilled technicians and therapists perform oxygen 
therapy, aerosol therapy, chest physical therapy, and techniques 
of intermittent and continuous mechanical ventilation. 

Technicians are also employed in such diverse areas as arterial 
blood gas analysis, pulmonary function laboratories, and 
pulmonary rehabilitation, and management. 

Respiratory Therapy Technician programs at Ivy Tech are fully 
accredited by the Joint Review Committee for Respiratory Therapy 
Education and the American Medical Association's Committee 
on Allied Health Education and Accreditation. Successful com- 
pletion of this seven-quarter program leads to an Associate in 
Applied Science Degree awarded by the College and eligibility 
to take the certification examination which is nationally offered 
by the National Board for Respiratory Therapy. 

The Respiratory Therapy program exceeds all of the essentials 
established by the credentialing agency. Over 1,000 hours are 
spent in five of the largest hospitals in the region under supervi- 
sion of physicians and respiratory therapists. The program is a 
challenging blend of individual and group instruction to prepare 
the student for success in a demanding field. 



Respiratory Care Practitioner 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE » COURSE TITLE 



First 8110 Technical Communications 
Quarter 9305 Technical Math 

8308 Microbiology 

9322 Biophysics 

9353 Anatomy and Physiology 1 

TOTAL 
Second 4812 Respiratory Care Science 1 
Quarter 4813 Nursing Techniques 

4820 Cardiopulmonary Physiology 

8307 General Chemistry 

9354 Anatomy and Physiology 2 

TOTAL 
Third 4821 Respiratory Care Science 2 
Quarter 4823 Clinical Practicum 1 
4831 Clinical Medicine and 

Pathophysiology 
4844 Cardiopulmonary Lab Diagnosis 
TOTAL 
Fourth 4833 Clinical Practicum 2 
Quarter 4835 Respiratory Care Science 3 

TOTAL 
Fifth 4841 Clinical Practicum 3 
Quarter 4850 Therapist Practicum 1 
9358 Pharmacology 

TOTAL 

Sixth 4851 Therapist Practicum 2 (Part 1) 
Quarter 4814 Advanced Respiratory Care 

4815 Cardiopulmonary 

Pathophysiology 

4816 Cardiopulmonary Monitoring 

TOTAL 
Seventh 4851 Therapist Practicum 2 (Part 2) 
Quarter 0913 Techniques of Supervision 
8401 Human Relations 
9350 Medical Law and Ethics 
9472 Computer Programming 

TOTAL 
Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



CREDITS 

4 
4 
3 
3 
4 



113 



53 



Surgical Technology 

The health care industry changes rapidly and so does the educa- 
tion required. Knowledge and skills beyond the minimum educa- 
tional requirements of a surgical technologist are in demand. 

Ivy Tech's curriculum has recognized this demand and made 
the commitment to meet the present and projected needs of the 
health care industry. 

Ivy Tech's Surgical Technology program provides a significant 
portion of course work in the clinical environment of the surgeries 
of local major hospitals as well as lectures in a college classroom. 
Upon graduation, the student is eligible to take the national cer- 
tification exam. The employment outlook for surgical 
technologists remains good. 



Surgical Technology 

Technical Certificate 



COURSE tt COURSE TITLE 



First 
Quarter 



4201 
4211 
8308 
9350 
9353 
9355 



Surgical Concepts 
Surgical Techniques 1 
General Microbiology 
Medical Law and Ethics 
Anatomy and Physiology 
Medical Terminology 



TOTAL 



Second 4221 Surgical Procedures 1 

Quarter 4222 Clinical Applications 1 

9354 Anatomy and Physiology 

9358 Pharmacology 



TOTAL 



Third 4230 Surgical Procedures 2 

Quarter 4231 Clinical Applications 2 

8401 Human Relations 

Fourth 4240 Clinical Applications 3 

Quarter 4242 Surgical Procedures 3 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



Total Technical Certificate Credits 



23 



20 



54 



Proposed Programs 
1988-89 



The following programs of study are under review 
for the 1988-89 academic year. 



55 



Associate of Science Degree Nursing* 

The proposed Associate of Science Degree in Nursing (ADN), 
a two-year program, will meet the requirements and expectations 
of the Indiana State Board of Nursing for licensure of Registered 
Nurses. The new expanded Associate degree program in 
Indianapolis will provide students the opportunity to transfer to 
one of the four local four-year baccalaureate nursing programs. 

The associate degree nurse functions as a provider and 
manager of client care, client teacher, effective communicator, 
and involved member within the profession of nursing. Graduates 
of the program will have the opportunity to transfer to a BSN pro- 
gram. The general education courses will be offered by a recog- 
nized four-year college or university. 

The purposes of the College's Associate of Science Degree 
in Nursing Program are to prepare students for registered nursing 
positions, and to maintain a flexible program that is responsive 
to the needs of the community and individual students. 

Tending final approval at the time of publication of the bulletin. 



Associate of Science Degree 
in Nursing 

(Two- Year Program) 



COURSE * 

Fall 45XA 
Quarter 45XB 


' COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

Introduction to Nursing 6 
Introduction to Nursing 
Practicum 6 


Fall 
Semester 




Chemistry 
Introductory Psychology 


3 
3 


Winter 
Quarter 


45XC 
45XD 


Life Cycle Nursing I: 
Prenatal Period/Infancy 

Nursing Practicum I: 
Prenatal Period/Infancy 


6 
6 


Spring 
Semester 




Anatomy and Physiology I 
Lifespan Development 


4 
3 


Spring 
Quarter 


45XE 
45XF 


Life Cycle Nursing II 
Toddler to Adolescence 

Nursing Practicum II: 
Toddler to Adolescence 


6 
6 


Summer 
Semester 




Optional: Some General Education 
courses may be taken at this point 




Summer 
Quarter 




No summer nursing classes. 




Fall 
Quarter 


45XG 
45XH 


Life Cycle Nursing HI: 
Early Adulthood 

Nursing Practicum HI: 
Early Adulthood 


6 
6 


Fall 
Semester 




Anatomy and Physiology II 
Microbiology and Lab 


4 
4 


Winter 
Quarter 


45X1 
45XJ 


Life Cycle Nursing IV: 
Middle Adulthood 

Nursing Practicum IV: 
Middle Adulthood 


6 
6 


Spring 
Semester 




English Composition 
Sociology 


3 
3 


Spring 
Quarter 


45XK 


Life Cycle Nursing V: 
Older Adulthood and Aging 


5 



45XL Nursing Practicum V: 

Older Adulthood and Aging 5 
4507 Issues in Nursing 2 



Associate of Science Degree 
in Nursing 

(LPN-to-ADN Career Mobility) 



COURSE TITLE 

Transition to ADN 
Practicum for Transition 
Credits for LPN Program 



COURSE # 

Summer 4501 
Quarter 4502 
(Enter LPN's 
Only) 

Fall 45XG Life Cycle Nursing III: 

Quarter Early Adulthood 

45XH Nursing Practicum III: 
Early Adulthood 



Winter 
Quarter 



45X1 



Spring 
Semester 



Life Cycle Nursing IV: 
Middle Adulthood 

Nursing Practicum IV: 
Middle Adulthood 

English Composition 
Sociology 



Spring 45XK Life Cycle Nursing V: 
Quarter Older Adulthood and Aging 

45XL Nursing Practicum V: 

Older Adulthood and Aging 

4507 Issues in Nursing 
Associate of Science Degree Totals: 



56 



Commercial Art Technology* 

An Associate of Science and an Associate of Applied Science 
Degree program in Commercial Art Technology will provide an 
additional educational option for the central Indiana student 
population through articulation with a four-year school. 

The Commercial Art program will prepare students for a pro- 
fessional career in the visual communications field. Students will 
leam procedures in research, problem-solving, developing a target 
marketing plan, concept/theme development, client presentations 
and studio practices. 

The program will provide experiences and competency skills 
in layout design, keylining, storyboarding, black and white illustra- 
tion, package design, type fitting and specification, computer 
graphics and pre-printing processes. Special attention will be 
given to designing for print (collateral), space and time. Students 
will learn to develop and produce multi-media campaigns for 
product and service organizations, corporate logos, corporate 
identity programs and reproduction quality illustrations. 

'Pending final approval at the time of publication of the bulletin. 



Commercial Art Technology 

Associate of Science Degree 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

Fall Intro to Graphic Design I 4 

Quarter 1830 Typography 4 

Drawing for Layout & Illustration 4 
TOTAL 



Winter 
Quarter 




Graphic Design II 
Production I 
Situation Drawing 


TOTAL 


4 

4 
4 


Spring 
Quarter 




Graphic Design III 

Production II 

Art History Survey I 


TOTAL 


4 
4 
4 


First Semester (Taken at four-year college) 
English Composition I 

TOTAL 


3 


Second Semester (Taken at four-year college) 
English Composition II 

TOTAL 


3 


Summer 
Quarter 




Graphic Design TV 
Special Projects I 


TOTAL 


4 
4 


Fall 
Quarter 




Graphic Design V 
Production III 
Independent Study I 


TOTAL 


4 
4 

4 


Winter 
Quarter 


1886 


Independent Study n 
Special Projects II 
Portfolio Preparation 
Art History Survey II 




4 
4 
4 
4 



TOTAL 

Third Semester (Taken at four-year college) 
General Education Elective 

TOTAL 

Fourth Semester (Taken at four-year college) 
General Education Elective 

TOTAL 
Associate of Science Degree Total: 



Commercial Art Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

Fall Intro, to Graphic Design I 4 

Quarter 1830 Typography 4 

Drawing for Layout & Illustration 4 

Communications 4 
TOTAL 

Graphic Design II 
Production I 
Situation Drawing 
Oral Communications 



Winter 
Quarter 



8110 



8113 



TOTAL 



Spring 
Quarter 



Summer 
Quarter 



8212 



8403 



Graphic Design m 
Production II 
Business Mathematics 
Art History Survey I 



TOTAL 



Graphic Design IV 
Special Projects I 
Light and Sound 
Psychology of Advertising 



TOTAL 

Graphic Design V 
Production IH 
Independent Study I 
8111 Business Communications 

TOTAL 

Independent Study II 
Special Projects II 
1886 Portfolio Preparation 
Art History Survey II 

TOTAL 
Total Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits 



Fall 
Quarter 



Winter 
Quarter 



57 



Interior Design Technology* 

An Associate of Science and an Associate of Applied Science 
Degree program in Interior Design Technology will provide an 
additional educational option for the central Indiana student 
population through articulation with a four-year school. 

Students entering the interior design program will be educated 
in basic skills including space planning, drawing, and selecting 
colors and materials. Advanced-level training will afford the stu- 
dent job-specific, practical experience. 

"Interior designers plan, design, and furnish the interiors of 
private homes, public buildings, and commercial establishments 
like offices, restaurants and theaters. They coordinate colors; 
select furniture, floor coverings, and curtain materials; and design 
lighting and architectural detail like crown molding." (Occupa- 
tional Outlook Handbook, 1986-87, p. 163) 

Positions as interior designers may be found in design studios 
for small companies or a large corporation or self employment. 

'Pending final approval at the time of publication of the bulletin. 



Interior Design Technology 

Associate of Science Degree 



COURSE # COURSE TITLE 

Fall 2011 Color Theory 

Quarter 2021 Textiles 1 

2022 Interior Design 1 

2051 Display 1 



Winter 2013 Structural Design 1 
Quarter 2031 Textiles 2 

2041 Furniture Selection 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



Spring 2023 Structural Design 2 3 

Quarter 2032 Furniture Styles 1 3 

2053 Furniture Arrangement & 

Space Planning 3 

xxxx Minor 3 
TOTAL 

First Year (Taken at four-year college) 

English Composition 1 3 

English Composition 2 3 

Speech 3 



Interior Design Technology 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 



COURSE t 


i COURSE TITLE CREDITS 


Fall 


2011 


Color Theory 


3 


Quarter 


2021 


Textiles 1 


3 




2022 


Interior Design 1 


3 




2051 


Display 1 


3 




8110 


Communications 

TOTAL 


4 


Winter 


0575 


Topics in Data Processing 1 


4 


Quarter 


2013 


Structural Design 1 


4 




2031 


Textiles 2 


3 




2041 


Furniture Selection 

TOTAL 


3 


Spring 


2023 


Structural Design 2 


3 


Quarter 


2032 


Furniture Styles 1 


3 




2053 


Furniture Arrangement & Space 








Planning 


3 




8212 


Business Mathematics 


4 




xxxx 


Minor 


3 



TOTAL 



Summer 2033 Furniture Styles 2 

Quarter 2044 Environmental Psychology 

2052 Professional Practices 

8113 Oral Communications 

xxxx Minor 



TOTAL 



Fall 
Quarter 



2010 Composition and Design 1 3 

2012 History of Art 1 3 

8401 Human Relations 4 

xxxx Minor 3 

xxxx Minor 3 

TOTAL 16 

Winter 2020 Composition and Design 2 3 

Quarter 2050 Applied Interior Design 1 4 

xxxx Mathematics of Finance 1 4 

xxxx Minor 3 

xxxx Minor 3 

TOTAL 17 

Associate of Applied Science Degree Total: 96 



Summer 2033 Furniture Styles 2 

Quarter 2044 Environmental Psychology 

2052 Professional Practices 

xxxx Minor 



TOTAL 



Fall 2010 Composition and Design 

Quarter 2012 History of Art 1 

xxxx Minor 

xxxx Minor 



Winter 2020 

Quarter 2050 

xxxx 

xxxx 



TOTAL 

Composition and Design 2 
Applied Interior Design 1 
Minor 
Minor 

TOTAL 



Second Year (To be taken at four-year school) 

Math 3 

Psychology 3 

General Ed. Elective 3 

TOTAL 

Associate of Science Degree Total: 



58 



Medical Records Technician* 

The increase in paperwork related to medical records, and the 
importance to health agencies of complete and accurate records, 
have led to a demand for trained medical record technicians. In 
addition, in recent years the number of types of health care 
facilities available to the public has increased. 

A medical record is a permanent record of one person's medical 
health and/or treatment. Each record consists of all medical 
reports which describe the patient's condition and progress. It 
is maintained and used for patient care management, quality 
review, financial reimbursement, legal affairs, education, research 
and public health. The job of the medical record technician is in 
the preparation, organization, and evaluation of these medical 
records. 

The Medical Record Technician (MRT) may be employed in 
hospitals, medical clinics, long term care facilities, state and 
federal health agencies, insurance firms, health research 
societies, or in computer and office equipment companies as 
sales representatives. 

The proposed Medical Record Technician program of the 
College in the Indianapolis Region will be two academic years, 
or six quarters, in length. Graduates will receive an Associate of 
Applied Science degree and will be eligible to take the National 
Accreditation examination offered by the American Medical 
Record Association to become an accredited Medical Record 
Technicians (MRT). 

'Pending final approval at the time of publication of the bulletin. 



Medical Records Technician 

Associate of Science Degree 



COURSE # 

First 3719 

Quarter 9355 

9353 

xxOl 

Second 1255 

Quarter 8401 

9354 

3743 

Third 9356 

Quarter 3744 

xx04 

xx05 

Fourth 1256 

Quarter 8111 

xx02 

xx06 

Fifth 3732 

Quarter 3771 

XXU3 

XX08 



COURSE TITLE 

Medical Typewriting 1 
Medical Terminology 
Anatomy & Physiology 1 
Medical Record Science 1 



CREDITS 

3 
4 

4 
4 



Introduction to Word Processing 1 4 

Human Relations 4 

Anatomy & Physiology 2 4 

Machine Transcription - Medical 1 3 

Disease Conditions 3 

Machine Transcription - Medical 2 3 

Coding and Classification Systems 4 

Health Data Statistics 4 

Word Processing Operations 4 

Business Communications 4 

Medical Record Science 2 4 

Documentation of Medical Records 4 

Medical Office Communications 4 

Medical Insurance 3 

Medical Record Science 3 4 

Medical Record Technology - 

Practicum 1 4 



Sixth 0913 

Quarter 9310 

xx07 

xx09 

xxxx 
Total Credits 



Techniques of Supervision 1 3 

Pharmacology 4 

Legal Aspects of Medical Records 2 
Medical Record Technology - 

Practicum 2 4 

Directed Electives 3 



59 



Real Estate Management 

An Associate of Science degree program in Real Estate 
Management would prepare the student for specific job oppor- 
tunities in real estate and the associated professions both in 
Indianapolis and statewide. 

Real estate is a field that includes many specialties. While the 
majority of real estate professionals are employed in residential 
and commercial brokerage, many others are employed in 
appraisal, mortgage and financing property management, title 
insurance, construction and development. This program would 
provide graduates with the job skills necessary to enter these 
specialized fields. 

The State of Indiana, acting in the interest of its citizens, 
regulates the practice of real estate by requiring those wishing 
to practice certain aspects of this field to be licensed. With the 
exception of real estate brokerage most of the specialties have 
no formal educational requirements, with on-the-job training being 
the norm. 

This program would provide the necessary training in real estate 
brokerage and provide the student with the necessary competen- 
cies in associated skills such as title law, financing, appraisal, 
and property management. This body of knowledge would com- 
plement the real estate sales and brokerage courses currently 
offered by Indiana Vocational Technical College as well as open 
up new career possibilities. 

The curriculum for this program will include specialized courses 
such as appraisal and general electives in areas such as business 
math, accounting, and computer literacy. 

The real estate program will benefit the citizens of the State 
of Indiana by providing a pool of workers who are knowledgeable 
and competent in the many diverse areas of the real estate 
profession. 

The need for skilled workers in many real estate careers is on 
the rise. The housing market has experienced a steady upswing 
in recent years. Several factors have come together that should 
keep the demand for housing and real estate professionals strong 
well into the next decade. 



Real Estate Management 

Associate of Science Degree 

COURSE # COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

Fall 1140 Real Estate Sales** 4 

Quarter 8110 Communications 4 

8212 Business Math 4 
xxxx Elective * 

Winter 0575 Topics in Data Processing 4 

Quarter 0323 Management Principles 4 

8111 Business Communications 4 

xxxx Elective * 

Spring xxOl Real Estate Finance 4 

Quarter 0112 Accounting for Non-Majors 4 

8401 Human Relations 4 

xxxx Elective * 

Summer 1152 Real Estate Brokerage** 4 

Quarter xx02 Property Management 4 

0607 Productivity Software 4 

xxxx Elective * 

Fall xx03 Commercial and Investment 

Quarter Real Estate 4 

0328 Laws Applied to Business 4 

xx04 General Science 4 

xxxx Elective * 

Winter xx05 Real Estate Appraisal 4 

Quarter 8111 Business Communications 4 

8213 Math of Finance 4 
xxxx Elective * 

Associate of Science Degree Total: 
Required Technical Courses 
General Education Courses 



90 
66 

24 

*Electives may be drawn from a broad, well defined selection, 
including, but not limited to additional real estate manage- 
ment courses. 

xx06 Title Theory 4 

xx07 Construction Principles 4 

xx08 Real Estate Law 4 

8501 Field Study/Coop Ed 3-6 

"Required by Indiana Real Estate Commission for licensure. 



'Pending final approval at the time of publication of the bulletin. 



60 



Course Descriptions 



0110 Accounting Principles 1 4 

Introduces fundamental principles, techniques, and tools of ac- 
counting. Explains the mechanics of accounting, including the col- 
lection, summary, analysis, and reporting of information pertaining 
to a service enterprise. Includes study of bank accounts and cash 
funds, and payroll accounting. 

0112 Accounting for Non-Majors 4 

Analyzes financial statements to determine levels of efficiency and 
company performance. Instructs in ratio and trend analysis, budgeting, 
capital expenditures, and price level effects on accounting. 

0120 Accounting Principles 2 4 

Studies special journals; includes work sheets and financial 
statements for a merchandising business internal control, notes and 
interest, sales procedures, inventories and fixed assets. Computerized 
practice set is included in course. Prerequisite 0110. 

0122 Business Law 1 3 

Studies the judicial system and the nature and sources of business 
law. Describes the nature of torts and crimes for which the law pro- 
vides punishment with emphasis on legal situation encountered in 
the performance of breach of contracts, in the creation of an agency, 
and in sales and negotiable instruments. 

0130 Accounting Principles 3 4 

Develops accounting skills in journal and statement presentation of 
corporated capital stock, receivables, intangible assets, deferred 
charges, long-term liabilities, and temporary and long-term invest- 
ments, introduces branch operations accounting. Prerequisite 0120. 

0136 Accounting for Government and Non-profit Entities 3 

Introduces principles of fund accounting and various types of funds 
in terms of categories and groups of accounts. There is less emphasis 
on profit motives and more on achieving major goals in connection 
with legal implications and budgetary constraints. 

0140 Intermediate Accounting 1 4 

Studies accounting principles pertaining to the income statement and 
balance sheet, cash receipts, disbursements and reconciliations, 
accounts receivable, and bad debts. Prerequisite 0110, 0120, 0130. 

0141 Individual Income Taxes 4 

Presents accounting procedures and problems associated with state and 
federal income tax laws pertaining to individuals, estates, and trusts. 

0142 Job Order Cost Accounting 4 

Studies job order cost accounting procedures, manufacturing overhead 
control, departmentalization, material and labor control, and report forms. 

0143 Business Law 2 3 

Includes study of bailments, secured transactions, partnerships and 
corporations, property, wills and trusts, insurance, suretyship, guaranty, 
and bankruptcy. 

0150 Intermediate Accounting 2 4 

Provides intermediate and advanced study of accounting principles per- 
taining to corporations, temporary investments, long-term investments, 
special bond transactions, amortization, revaluation and retirement of 
plant and equipment, repairs and maintenance, depreciation, natural 
resources, intangible assets, and inventory valuation. Prerequisite 0140. 

0151 Process Cost Accounting 4 

Studies process cost accounting, standard cost procedures, and estima- 
tion and control of costs by means of budget use and profit analysis. 



0160 Intermediate Accounting 3 4 

Covers accounting practices pertaining to stockholders' equity, cor- 
porate earnings, corporate dividends, statement of change in financial 
position, and financial statement analysis. Prerequisite 0150. 

0320 Management Principles 4 

The foundation management course with focus on the basic functions 
and activities common to management work. Guidelines for effective 
management are studied. 

0321 Office Administration 4 

Focuses on the activities of the office manager, including office 
organization, office site location, office layout and environment, records 
management, and office communication devices and services. 

0322 Personnel Administration 4 

Focuses on the activities of the personnel administrator, including per- 
sonnel recruitment and placement, personnel appraisal and training, 
job analysis and classification, wage and salary administration, and 
employer-employee relations. 

0323 Business Principles and Organization 4 

Examines our business system in relation to our economic society. 
Studies business ownership, organization principles and problems, 
management, control facilities, administration, and development prac- 
tices of American business enterprises. 

0328 Laws Applied to Business 4 

A survey course designed to acquaint Business and Management 
students with significant areas of the law which directly or indirectly 
impinge on the business environment. 

0510 Data Processing Fundamentals 5 

Provides general introduction to data processing and programming, with 
emphasis on hands-on computer experience. This course will examine 
the role of data processing in an organization which includes: data pro- 
cessing applications, computer hardware and software, internal data 
representation, stored program concepts, systems and programming 
design, flowcharting, and data communication. Additional topics include 
the history of computers, related computer careers, the social impact 
of computers, and computer security. 

0512 BASIC Language Programming 5 

Introduces BASIC, a computational, problem-oriented language. Covers 
use of arithmetical expressions, conditional control, iteration techni- 
ques, input-output specifications, tables, and sub-programs for solv- 
ing elementary business problems. 

0520 COBOL Programming Fundamentals 5 

Provides an introduction to COBOL (Common Business Oriented 
Language) with the major emphasis on developing structured program- 
ming skills. Develops proficiency in applying the programming develop- 
ment cycle to elementary business problems. 

0521 Practical Computer Operations 5 

Introduces students to computer operations, hardware, media, operating 
systems, and DOS Job Control Language. Concepts are reinforced by 
actual hands-on computer room experience. 

0522 Problem-Solving Fundamentals 3 

Emphasizes efficient problem solving techniques as they apply to 
business related computer programming problems. Develops ability and 
confidence through flowcharting examples and exercises. 



61 



0530 Advanced COBOL Programming 5 

Continues those topics introduced in Introduction to COBOL with 
more logically complex business problems. The student develops 
a higher level of COBOL proficiency as well as a greater familiarity 
with debugging techniques and the structured approach through 
class instruction and laboratory experience. 

0531 Operating Systems 5 

A study of computer operating systems, purposes, structure and 
various functions. Provides general understanding of how com- 
prehensive sets of language translators and service programs, 
operating under supervisory coordination of an integrated control 
program, form the total operating system of a computer. 

0540 Systems Analysis and Design 4 

Provides instruction for creating or modifying a system by gather- 
ing details, analyzing the data, designing the system by creating solu- 
tions, and implementing and maintaining the system. 

0541 COBOL Programming 3 5 

Emphasizes file handling techniques on both tape and direct access 
devices and the use of libraries via the COBOL CALL and COPY 
verbs. Although top-down construction, modularization, the GO TO- 
less programming are stressed throughout all COBOL classes, 
variant forms of the "structured" approach as well as unstructured 
concepts such as the GO TO verb are introduced at this level. 
Through class discussion and lab assignments, the course helps 
the student develop good programming practices and an entry-level 
COBOL competency. 



0603 Micro/Minicomputer Operating Systems 4 

Introduces concepts, terms and operation skills for microcomputer 
and minicomputer operating systems. Acquaints the student with 
the method of control provided by the operating system of a com- 
puter to supervise, coordinate and integrate programs. Student will 
learn to use such operating systems as UNIX and PC-DOS. Pre- 
requisite 0601 or permission of Program Chair. 

0605 Microcomputer Database Design and Management 4 

A continuation of 0567. Designed to provide an in-depth focus and 
application of advanced Database Management techniques. Student 
will learn to use the advanced features of such software programs 
as dBASE III Plus to apply database concepts. Prerequisite 0567 or 
permission of Program Chair. 

0607 Productivity Software Applications 4 

An introduction to microcomputer software applications. Acquaints 
the student with the fundamentals of microcomputer workstations, 
terminology, and standard productivity software on microcomputer 
systems. Student will learn to use such software programs as dBase 
III plus, TWIN, and WordPerfect to demonstrate business applica- 
tions for microcomputer software. Prerequisite 0575 or permission 
of Program Chair. 

0608 Microcomputer Word Processing 4 

An introduction to microcomputer word processing. Acquaints the 
student with the fundamentals of word processing on micro work- 
stations. Student will learn to use such software programs as Word- 
star and Multimate in performing word processing tasks. Prerequisite 
0610 or permission of Program Chair. 



0560 Data Communications 4 

This course introduces the concepts of data communications for 
computer programming students in order to build a foundation of 
knowledge upon which to add the new technologies as they are 
developed. 

0567 Introduction to Database Management 4 

Introduces microcomputer database concepts, planning, design, and 
reporting through database management systems. Students will 
learn to use such software programs as dBASE III Plus in applying 
the database techniques to business information storage and 
reporting. Prerequisite 0607 or permission of Program Chair. 

0575 Topics in Data Processing 1 4 

Discusses topics of current interest in information/data processing 
as to the use of microcomputers in business. Introduces micro- 
computer history, terminology, fundamental equipment operations 
and disk storage as well as standard microcomputer software 
applications such as word processing, database management, and 
electronic spreadsheets. Students will apply such concepts during 
lab exercises using software included with the text. 



0576 Advanced Assembly Language for 

Mainframe Computers 5 

Continues those topics introduced in Assembly Language Fun- 
damentals with emphasis placed on disk programming techniques. 

0601 Office Automation 3 

Introduces student to the integration and automation of all infor- 
mation functions in the office. Emphasizes interpretation of several 
forms of computerized information processing including data 
processing, word processing, electronic mail, and graphics, with 
insight as to how automation of business operation affects the office 
worker. 



0609 Electronic Spreadsheets 4 

An introduction to electronic spreadsheet application programs. Em- 
phasis placed on how to automate the use of ledger worksheets for 
better financial planning and analysis. Some graphic representation 
of data is included. Students will learn to use such software pro- 
grams as Microsoft Multiplan and Lotus 1-2-3 to prepare financial 
reports and solve business problems. Prerequisite 0607 and 8212 
or permission of Program Chair. 

0610 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

Discusses topics of current interest in information/data processing 
as related to the use of microcomputers in business. Introduces 
microcomputer history, terminology, fundamental equipment opera- 
tion and disk storage as well as standard microcomputer software 
applications such as word processing, database management, and 
electronic spreadsheets. Students will apply such concepts during 
lab exercises using software included in the text. 

0613 Integrated Business Software 4 

Provides a working knowledge of integrated micro software con- 
cepts, interrelation, commands, and practical application. Integrated 
software uses individual applications that can share the same data, 
manipulating it in different ways. A continuation of 0609, the course 
provides an in-depth focus and application of advanced spreadsheet 
commands including special calculation functions, use of tables and 
macro design/execution. Students will learn to use the advance 
features of such programs as Lotus 1-2-3 to apply integrated soft- 
ware concepts. Prerequisite 0609 or permission of Program Chair. 

0619 C Programming Language 4 

Introduces "C" — a microcomputing programming language. In 
working within the UNIX operating system, the course emphasizes 
arithmetic expressions, conditional control, iteration techniques, in- 
put/output specification, table and sub-programming techniques. 
Prerequisites 0603 and 0512 or permission of Program Chair. 



62 



0711 Hospitality Management 4 

Analyses management's functions and responsibilities in such areas 
as administration, organization, communication, accounting, 
marketing and human relations. 

0712 Front Office Procedures 4 

This course presents a systematic approach to front office pro- 
cedures by detailing the flow of business through a hotel beginning 
with the reservation process and ending with billing and collection 
procedures. The course also places front office procedures within 
the context of the overall operation of a hotel and examines front 
office management, the process of handling complaints, and con- 
cerns regarding hotel safety and security. 

0723 Convention Management 3 

Defines the scope and various segments of the convention market, 
explains what is required to meet individual needs, and, most 
importantly, explores methods and techniques that lead to better 
service. 

0728 Hotel-Motel Seminar 3 

Seminar topics are selected to meet special training needs of local 
hotel-motel conditions and events. For example, seminar topics may 
be presented to orient graduates to community events, public health 
conditions, or computerized skills for newly developing hotel-motel 
systems. 

0731 Basic Cooking Methods I 4 

Explains and demonstrates the fourteen basic forms of food 
preparation. 

0733 Food and Beverage Management and Service 4 

Provides a basic understanding of the principles of food production 
and service management; reviews sanitation, menu planning, pur- 
chasing, storage, and beverage management. 

0742 Food and Beverage Purchasing and Control 4 

Studies the major food groups purchased by quantity buyers. 
Includes fresh and processed fruits and vegetables, dairy products, 
cereals and cereal products, beverages, poultry and eggs, fish and 
shellfish, meats, and alcoholic beverages. Outlines the essentials 
of effective food and beverage control and establishes systems for 
determining sale values. 

0744 Sanitation 4 

Studies in detail the principles and practices of sanitation for food 
service operations. Includes general cleaning practices, environmen- 
tal sanitation, and the scientific principles underlying good sanita- 
tion practices. Attention is given also to personal hygiene and the 
importance of sanitation from both economic and legal points of 
view. 

0751 Food and Beverage Cost Control, 

Planning and Procedures 4 

Studies in detail the various areas of control in a food and beverage 
operation. Items covered include points of control, people planning 
and procedures for stabilizing controls and monitoring controls once 
in place. 

0752 Sales Promotion 4 

Demonstrates the development of a marketing plan for any size 
operation. Shows how to unite all departments of a hotel operating 
into a coordinated team. Emphasizes the organization and function- 
ing of the sales department, with attention to sales tools and tech- 
niques, advertising, and types of markets. 

0753 Hotel-Motel Law 3 

Creates an awareness of responsibilities and rights which the law 
imposes upon and grants to the innkeeper and illustrates the conse- 
quences caused by a failure in those responsibilities; also discusses 
attitude of the courts toward the innkeeper involved in litigation. 



0760 Hotel Engineering Systems 3 

Presents information and principles important to both the managerial 
and technical functioning of the engineering/maintenance depart- 
ment, stressing the knowledge needed by managers at all levels in 
order of title to make appropriate and cost-effective decisions. 

0762 Hotel Supervisory Housekeeping 4 

Provides an overview of the fundamentals of housekeeping manage- 
ment. This course describes the management function, tools, and 
practices required in today's lodging and institutional housekeeping 
departments. 

0763 Hotel Maintenance l-Security Management 3 

Explains the issues surrounding the need of individualized security 
program, examines a wide variety of security and safety equipment 
and procedures, discusses guest protection and internal security 
for asset protection, and outlines OSHA regulations that apply to 
lodging properties. 

0901 Quality Control Concepts and Techniques 1 4 

Studies the latest quality control concepts and techniques in 
industry, with emphasis on modern manufacturing requirements. 

0902 Quality Control Concepts and Techniques 2 4 

Emphasizes recent technological developments; a continuation of 
0901 Quality Control Concepts and Techniques 1. 

0903 Quality Control Engineering Principles 

and Techniques 4 

Presents principles and techniques of modern quality control 
engineering, with attention to management, engineering, economic, 
and production factors. Emphasis placed on the assurance of quality 
at the hardware, processing, and systems levels. 

0904 Statistical Concepts and Techniques 4 

Presents various topics pertaining to statistical applications of quali- 
ty control, including frequency distribution, probability theory and 
applications, and sampling techniques. 

0905 Quality Control Engineering Theory and Application 4 

Presents current theory and applications of quality engineering for 
assuranceandverificationofproductqualityatthehardware.process- 
ing,andsystem levels. Emphasisisplacedon statistical analysis, lab- 
oratory experiments, and test and case problem-solving applications. 

0907 Reliability Objectives 4 

Introduces the development and principles of reliability engineer- 
ing. Establishes the mathematical and physical bases of reliability 
and applies the basic elements of reliability data analysis. Surveys 
concepts basic to modern reliability requirements, with emphasis 
on practical applications in manufacturing processes and produc- 
tion operations. 

0908 Nondestructive Tests 4 

Presents an overview of the relationship of nondestructive testing 
to the total quality function. Attention is given to the advantages 
and limitations of various test methods. 

0909 Mechanical Metrology 4 

Provides instruction and laboratory experiments in the use of 
mechanical testing and measurement equipment for quality control. 

0913 Techniques of Supervision 1 3 

Studies employee development, with emphasis upon the respon- 
sibilities of the beginning or newly appointed supervisor. Gives 
attention to functioning within the organizational structure, com- 
munications, motivation, delegation of authority, interviews, orien- 
tation and induction of new employees, and evaluation of employee 
performance. 



63 



0915 Electrical Metrology 4 

Offers instruction and laboratory experiments in the use of electrical 
testing and measurement equipment for quality control. 

0916 Procurement Quality Control 4 

Studies principles and functions of procurement quality control. 
Covers inspection techniques, tools, and records. 

0917 Reliability Techniques 4 

Studies reliability techniques and applications designed to obtain 
or improve reliability analysis. 

0923 Techniques of Supervision 2 3 

Develops the necessary skills for effective supervision of person- 
nel. Includes group discussion of selected topics, case studies, and 
in-basket situations. 

0930 General Industry OSHA and First Aid 3 

Studies the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OSHA) and stan- 
dards. Alerts the student to industrial hazards and demonstrates first 
aid techniques as outlined in the American Red Cross multimedia 
course. 

0942 Purchasing and Inventory Control 4 

Studies purchasing procedures and inventory management. 

0965 Business Management/Manufacturing 4 

The introductory manufacturing course. Focus is on basic principles, 
practices, and functions of manufacturing management. Includes 
application in the service industries, such as utilities, hospitals, and 
government. 

0967 Drafting and Manufacturing Standards 3 

Presents drafting theory and practice, with special attention to stan- 
dard practices of dimensioning, tolerancing, and notations of tool- 
ing components. Covers revolving out of position, line elimination, 
and sectioning. 

1001 Distribution and Logistics 4 

The foundation course for the study of the physical distribution of 
materials. Reviews the basic physical distribution and logistics 
systems relating to warehousing, materials handling, inventory con- 
trol, order processing, and transportation. 

1002 Manufacturing and Logistics 4 

This course concentrates on the flow of raw materials from source 
of supply to the production line, the materials in-process handling, 
and the movement of finished goods from end of the production 
line to shipment. 

1003 The Transportation System 4 

Traffic and transportation management applied to rate negotiation, 
routing, risk and claims, expediting and tracing. Distinguishes among 
types of transportation operations, including rail, motor, water, air, 
and pipelines. 

1 004 Warehouse and Inventory Control 4 

Evaluates the warehousing function and management system con- 
trols. Differentiates among the various inventory control systems. 
Reviews material handling methods for the preparation, placing, and 
positioning of materials to facilitate their movement or storage. 
Focus is placed on computer utilization in warehousing and inven- 
tory control management. 

1006 Case Studies 4 

This course is designed to apply, by the case study method, the 
knowledge, principles and skills acquired in ones own program con- 
centration (e.g., small business, manufacturing, marketing, physical 
distribution). The course primarily is structured as a seminar for 
individualized case analysis, presentation, discussion, and solution. 



1112 Introduction to Business 4 

The foundation course for business and management career prepara- 
tion. Provides a comprehensive overview of business operations, 
management functions, and business concerns. 

1115 Sales Techniques 4 

This course is designed to develop one's own art of selling. Sales 
knowledge and sales skills are applied to one's own choice of pro- 
duct. Selling principles are emphasized. 

1135 Retailing 4 

Studies retailing concepts and practices, including retail merchan- 
dise planning, buying, pricing, promotion, and control in established 
retail operations. Attention is given to managerial and operational 
skills. 

1137 Buying and Inventory Control 4 

Focuses on decision-making and the skills required in the purchas- 
ing of products and services for business. Attention is given to pro- 
curement, negotiation, transportation, and inventory management. 

1147 Principles of Advertising 4 

Focuses on advertising as the key element in the promotion of goods 
and services in the market place. Attention is given to advertising 
media and media selection, advertising copy strategy, advertising 
regulations, and organization of advertising functions. 

1148 Principles of Insurance 4 

Examines risks faced by business firms and considers ways of han- 
dling them. Covers property, liability, and personal losses, with at- 
tention to insurance contracts and their uses. Includes individual 
life, health, and pension insurance, public policy, government regula- 
tions, and social insurance programs. 

1151 Introduction to Public Relations 4 

Introduces the public relations field, including the role of public rela- 
tions in business and industry, nonprofit organizations, the benefits 
of public relations, the tools of the public relations practitioner, and 
principles and trends of the field. 

1157 Entrepreneurship 4 

This course is designed to develop one's own business plan for en- 
try into self-employment. Coverage also is applicable for the 
generalist small business administrator. The course primarily is struc- 
tured as a workshop for individualized business plan development. 

1161 Business Management/Marketing 4 

The introductory marketing course. Focus is on basic marketing 
strategy for targeting markets and for developing a marketing mix 
of product, price, distribution, and promotion. 

1208 Refresher Shorthand 2 

Designed to bring unused shorthand skills to an employable level. 
The course includes three areas of skill development: speed, theory, 
and transcription. 

1209 Refresher Typing 2 

Designed for typists who have mastered keyboarding skills. Em- 
phasis is placed on identifying causes of low typing speed and ac- 
curacy. Prescribed typing drills are assigned to strengthen diagnosed 
weakness. 

1210 Shorthand 1 4 

Introduces symbol shorthand, including theory, brief forms, and 
speed in reading from plate or machine notes. Introduces dictation, 
with emphasis on writing shorthand outlines. 



64 



1212 Typewriting 1 4 

Studies touch typewriting techniques and their applications. Includes 
typing of business letters and manuscripts, centering, tabulation, 
machine parts and care, and speed development. 

1220 Shorthand 2 4 

Develops dictation, note-reading, and transcription skills through 
drills and tests. Emphasizes speed, accuracy, and use of correct 
English. 

1222 Typewriting 2 4 

Focuses on business letters, forms, manuscripts, and tabulations. 
Builds speed and accuracy, and use of correct English. 

1224 Records Management 3 

Introduces methods and procedures of maintaining business records 
of various types, with attention to filing systems and file 
maintenance. Develops skills through practice situations. 

1226 Data Entry 4 

Prepares the student for employment in data entry or related data 
processing positions in a modern computerized business. The course 
teaches basic keyboarding skills in addition to providing experience 
with typical applications and a variety of data entry techniques on 
an IBM Personal Computer. Speed and accuracy are strongly 
stressed. Prerequisite 1212 or equivalent. 

1230 Shorthand 3 4 

Reviews fundamental shorthand skills, emphasizing new matter dic- 
tation and mailable transcription. Emphasizes use of correct English. 

1232 Typing 3 4 

Improves production typing skills. Includes complex tabulation, 
statistical reports, rough drafts, manuscripts, and forms. 

1236 Office Calculating Machines 3 

Gives the student a competent touch skill level in entering numbers 
in applications of related mathematical problems and the basic 
operation of electronic calculating machines representative of those 
used in business offices. Prerequisite 8212. 

1241 Clerical Office Procedures 4 

Explores the range of opportunities available in the clerical field. 
Includes filing, machine transcription, and duplicating machine 
techniques and receptionist training. Also introduces the duties of 
legal, medical, and administrative secretaries. 

1242 Typewriting 4 4 

Develops a high level of typing skills. Emphasizes complex tabula- 
tion, statistical reports, rough drafts, manuscripts, and forms. 

1255 Word Processing (Part 1) 2 

This lecture course enables students to become knowledgeable in 
the concepts of word processing systems, their history, and their 
future. Co-requisite is 1256. 

1254 Word Processing Concepts 2 

Provides the student with a working knowledge of how dedicated 
word processing tasks are performed on a microcomputer. Students 
will learn to create, edit, alter text formats, and print documents in- 
cluding memoranda, letters, reports and mass mailings using such 
software programs as IBM DisplayWrite 3 or 4. 

1255 Introduction to Word Processing Module 2 2 

Provides the student with a working knowledge of how dedicated 
word processing tasks are performed on a microcomputer. Students 
will learn to create, edit, alter text formats, and print documents 
including memoranda, letters, reports and mass mailings using IBM 
Display Write Software. 



1256 Word Processing Operations 4 

Provides practical training on word processing operations toward 
solving problems and developing projects. Co-requisite is 1255. 

1257 Word Processing Applications 4 

Offers experience in applying word processing equipment. Emphasis 
is placed on English grammar principles and proofreading skills. 

1262 Typewriting 5 4 

Focuses on production techniques pertaining to correspondence, 
business forms, manuscripts, tabulation, secretarial projects, and 
transcription of machine-recorded dictation. Emphasis is placed on 
grammar, spelling, and letter format. 

1267 Machine Dictation and Transcription 2 

Develops transcription and communication skills, integrating those 
learned in other areas, such as typing and technical and business 
communications. Broadens the student's marketable skills with train- 
ing in the use of machine transcription equipment. 

1274 Supervision of Word Processing Operations 4 

Studies the management and supervision of a word processing 
system. Demonstrates starting and stopping the system com- 
ponents, care of the printer, archiving and deleting documents to 
avoid system overload, use and maintenance of production logs, per- 
formance of control operation tasks, and supervising the work of 
other operators in the office. 

1275 Word Processing Files Management 4 

Demonstrates how to create, use, change, and update files on the 
IBM 5520 Administrative Word Processor or equivalent system. 

1302 Legal Research/Writing 4 

Legal Research and Writing includes the study and use of legal 
research tools such as digests, loose leaf services, reporters, 
statutory compilations and forms books. Legal writing format and 
methodology will be presented through practical application in draf- 
ting memoranda, correspondence and selected forms. Shepherdiz- 
ing and proper case citation skills are emphasized. 81 10 Communica- 
tion is a prerequisite. 

1303 Civil Law and Procedures 4 

Civil Law and Procedures includes the study of the Indiana Trial Rules 
and miscellaneous local rules: Filing requirements, computation of 
time and form drafting are emphasized. 

1305 Family Law 4 

Family Law includes a survey of the law of dissolution, custody, child 
support and visitation, marriage and adoption. Financial declaration 
forms, client intake, Marion County Child Support Guidelines, and 
available social services are presented as practical information. 

1306 Criminal Law and Procedures 4 

Criminal Law and Procedures includes a survey of Indiana criminal 
statutes and selected federal criminal laws. Investigative and 
administrative skills are emphasized. 

1307 Wills, Trusts and Probate 4 

Wills, Trusts and Probate includes a survey of estate planning, will 
drafting, adoption and guardianship procedures and the law underly- 
ing these proceedings. Preparation of probate and administration 
forms, asset inventories and valuations, certain tax forms and 
accounting are presented. 

1308 Propeprty Law 4 

Property Law includes a survey of the law of real and personal pro- 
perty. Practical exposure includes review of title searches, loan 
documents, zoning requirements, bills of sale, financial statements, 
mortgage documents, leases, and deeds. 



65 



1309 Torts 4 

Torts includes a survey of the law of comparative negligence, pro- 
ducts liability, defamation, false arrest, and other civil wrongs, 
including knowledge of the elements of such causes. 

1314 Bankruptcy Law 4 

Bankruptcy Law includes a survey of the Federal Bankruptcy Act. 
Skills necessary to accumulate personal financial information, com- 
pile initial schedules, collect and organize data for first meeting of 
creditors, complete proofs of claim, and pursue certain creditor's 
rights are stressed. 

1316 Litigation 4 

Litigation includes the study of the Indiana Rules pertaining to actual 
trial. The discovery process and its tools are reviewed. Skills such 
as document organization and retrieval, witness statementizing, 
deposition summarizing, indexing and scheduling are presented. 
Trial notebook preparation is surveyed. 1303 Civil Procedure is a 
prerequisite. 

1318 Contracts and Commercial Law 4 

Contracts and Commercial Law includes a survey of contract law 
and the Environmental Commercial Code. Special statutes regarding 
state unfair trade practices, consumer deception and consumer 
rights are also presented. 

1319 Claims Investigations 4 

Claims investigation includes the study of witness interview tech- 
niques, preservation of evidence, organizational skills, and alternative 
methods of gathering facts. Professional client intake and com- 
munication skills are emphasized. 

13XX Business Associations 4 

Business Associations includes the study of various business struc- 
tures and the formalities required for such structures. A survey of 
partnership, agency and corporation law is included. 

13XX Office Management and Ethics 4 

Office Management and Ethics includes instruction on automated 
and manual docket and conflict control system, file organization, 
closed file control, research segregation, client funds handling and 
management tasks. Internal communication skills and compliance 
with the Rules of Professional Conduct are stressed. 

13XX Appellate Procedure 4 

Appellate Procedure includes an in-depth study of the Indiana Rules 
of Appellate Procedure, with concentration on the mechanical 
aspects of preparation and filing of the record on appeal, and the 
format required of the briefs submitted. 1303 Civil Procedure and 
1306 Criminal Law and Procedure are prerequisites. 

13XX Computers in the Law Office 4 

Computers in the Law Office includes survey of software support 
available to the law practitioner, such as litigation support and estate 
planning support. Also included is instruction in the availability and 
use of research databases such as Dialog, Nexis, Lexis and Westlaw. 
1302 Legal Research and Writing and 0610 Introduction to Micro- 
computers are prerequisites. 

13XX Evidence and Federal Procedure 4 

Evidence and Federal Procedure includes a review of the Federal 
Rules of Civil Procedure and the differences between the Federal 
Rules and the Indiana Trial Rules. The Federal Rules of Evidence 
are presented and discussed as a basis for preparation of eviden- 
tiary portions of a trial notebook. 

2610 Child Growth and Development 4 

Introductory study of the physical, social, emotional and mental 
development of the preschool child. The influence of cultural environ- 
ment on development and individual differences are considered. 



2612 Childhood Health 3 

Instruction in basic health and illnesses pertaining to early childhood. 

2641 Childhood Movements 4 

2642 Nutrition and Meal Planning 4 

Focuses on the nutritional needs of preschool children and the state 
regulations for food and nutrition in child care centers. Demonstrates 
ways to promote nutritional values in preschool children. 

2643 Preschool Art 4 

Presents the methods, techniques, and materials used in art 
experiences for young children. 

2651 Language Arts for Children 4 

Presents methods and techniques useful in the development of 
language skills in preschool children. 

2652 Children's Literature 1 3 

2660 Preschool Music 4 

Instruction in theory and the planning of musical activities for 
preschool children. Includes use of songs, records, and simple 
instruments for group activities. 

2661 Management Techniques 4 

Introduces the principles of managing a child care agency. 
Emphasizes the role of the manager in relation to agency person- 
nel. Staff interpersonal relationships and funding sources are also 
discussed. Resume writing and job-seeking skills are stressed. 

2761 Interdisciplinary Team 4 

This course will explore reasons which support the need to work 
as an interdisciplinary team, the various departments which may 
compose the team, and the services each department provides. 

3410 Buffet Catering 2 

Studies cold food preparation and presentation techniques, including 
charcuterir, specialty canapes, hors d'oeuvres, appetizers, pates, 
mousses, cold sauces, vegetable carving, food decoration. Also 
covers food materials utilization, buffet planning, layout, equipment, 
zoning and services. 

3411 Introduction to Culinary Arts 2 

A knowledge of basic cooking methods is essential for the correct 
preparation of foods which will ensure optimal quality in terms of 
flavor, color, appearance, and nutritional value. This course is 
intended to introduce you to the basic methods and procedures of 
food preparation. 

3413 Introduction to Foods 2 

Presents the background of various food products, the contributions 
of leading culinarians, types of food service establishments and their 
organizational structures, and future trends in the food service in- 
dustry. Also provides knowledge on the various herbs and spices 
used in food preparation. 

3415 Introduction to Baking 3 

Introduces the science and technology of baking, with emphasis 
on ingredients and preparation. Special emphasis is placed on 
cookies, quick breads, cakes, and pies. Conversions, measuring and 
mixing procedures will also be studied. Please note - this course 
is the preliminary course to 3436 and 3467. 

3416 Culinary Theory and Skills Development 3 

This course will concentrate on the four major stocks and soups 
and sauces that are derived from them. Time will be given to help 
develop the necessary skills to prepare food using any one of the 
fourteen major cooking methods. 



66 



3417 Pantry & Breakfast Cookery 2 

This course covers the techniques and skills needed in breakfast 
cookery, as wel I as insight to the pantry department. Various methods 
of preparationof eggs, pancakes, waffles, and cereals will bediscussed. 
You will receive knowledge and experience in salad prep, salad dress- 
ings, hot and cold sandwich prep, garnishes and appetizers. 

3419 Culinary Externship 1 3 

Offers practical work experience in a commercial food establishment 
in order to build specialized skills. Externship I will look at basic 
food prep skills equal to that of a Prep. cook. An externship agree- 
ment must be completed by the student, the establishment, and the 
externship coordinator, prior to the start of the course. Students 
should have an externship site in mind prior to registering for this 
course (coordinator can assist). 

3421 Nutrition 3 

Explores the relationship of food and nutrition to optimal physical 
fitness. Studies the individual daily needs for protein, vitamins and 
minerals and the food sources that supply them. 

3425 Introduction to Table Service 2 

Introduces dining room service and supervision, including equip- 
ment, personnel, responsibilities, organization, customer relations, 
and table service. Students must actually perform a variety of table 
service styles to complete this course. 

3426 Purchasing, Storeroom Procedures, & Stewarding 2 

Studies in detail major groups of food purchased by quantity buyers; 
including fresh fruits and vegetables, dairy products, meats and 
seafood, processed products, beverages, and non-food items. 
Outlines the essentials of effective F&B control, while establishing 
systems for sale values for food and beverages. 

3427 Institutional Foodservice 2 

This course will introduce you to the variety of institutional food- 
service facilities. The course will also include converting recipes 
for quantity food production, calculating per portion cost, and deter- 
mining profitable selling prices. 

3428 Intermediate Hot Food Preparation 2 

Course will test the student on basic cooking skills. Emphasis will 
be placed on appropriate cooking, holding and serving of hot food 
dishes. 

3429 Culinary Externship II 3 

Offers practical work experience in a commercial food establishment 
in order to build specialized skills. Externship II will look at cook- 
ing skills equal to that of a Line cook. An externship agreement must 
be completed by the student, the establishment, and the externship 
coordinator, prior to the start of the course. Students should have 
an externship site in mind prior to registering for this course (coor- 
dinator can assist). 

3430 Meat Cutting 3 
In this course the student will begin the study of meat cutting. The 
student will gain knowledge in the breakdown of beef, pork, poultry, 
lamb, and veal. 

3436 Advance Baking/Introduction to Classical Pastry 3 

Provides further study in the science and technology of baking, with 
emphasis on yeast products, and cake decorating. Please note - this 
course is the preliminary course to 3467. 

3439 Culinary Externship 3 3 

Offers practical work experience in a commercial food establishment 
in order to build specialized skills. Externship III will look at cook- 
ing and management skills. An externship agreement must be com- 
pleted by the student, the establishment, and the externship coor- 
dinator, prior to the start of the course. Students should have an 
externship site in mind prior to registering for this course (coor- 
dinator can assist). 



3440 International Food Preparation 3 

In this course you will be introduced to foods from around the world. 
You will gain a background in the history of foods from various coun- 
tries as well as developing skills in preparation of these foods. 

3442 Buffet Catering 2 

Studies hot and cold food preparation and presentation techniques, 
including specialty canapes, hors d'oeuvres, etc. Also covers food 
materials utilization, buffet planning, layout, equipment, zoning and 
services. 

3444 Introduction to Food Service 3 

A knowledge of basic cooking methods is essential for the correct 
preparation of foods which will ensure optimal quality in terms of 
flavor, color, appearance, and nutritional value. This course is in- 
tended to introduce you to the basic methods and procedures of 
food preparation, as well as the history and overall operation of a 
restaurant. 

3455 Menu Design 4 

Class will cover menu planning that will meet the requirements of 
various types of food service operations. This class will include 
layout and design, pricing, and various types of menus. Menus as 
a marketing tool will also be discussed. 

3459 Classical Cuisine & Banquet Organization 3 

Presents advanced and sophisticated classical culinary methods 
following the principles and techniques of Escoffier. Studies cook- 
ing techniques, timing, presentation, history and terms relevant to 
classical foods and menus, with emphasis on French cuisine. Offers 
practical experience in table service operation, emphasizing kitchen 
coordination and timing. Covers legal consideration, sales planning, 
menu layout, floor plans, ceremonial functions (weddings, etc.) and 
off and on-premise catering. Attention is given also to kosher 
catering. 

3461 A la Carte Food Preparation and 

Advanced Table Service 3 

Includes study and preparation of individually listed menu items. 
Course will also cover techniques of French service. Students will 
follow the traditional European brigade systems. 

3462 Advanced Food Preparation and Banquet Service 3 

Offers advanced study of haute cuisine preparation and service. 
Includes buffet presentations as a course project. 

3467 Classical Pastries 3 

This course involves the study of classical pastry. What constitutes 
classical, why is a pastry considered classical, and how it becomes 
classical? How do these desserts relate to modern baking methods 
in hotels, retails, or commercial production methods? 

Names and terminology of desserts prepared and discussed are to 
familiarize the student to the classic French, Italian and European. 
This course also includes the preparation of desserts (hot and cold). 
The making and baking of speciality goods such as puff pastry, 
specialty cookies: ganache, parlimosa creams and fillings; and 
specialty sauces. Emphasis is placed on size, consistency, presen- 
tation, eye appeal and taste of pastries produced. 

3470 Fish & Seafood 3 

Course discusses the importance of fish and seafood in today's 
market. Discussions include: types and categories of American and 
imported fish and shell fish, proper buying, storage, preparation, and 
merchandising of fish and seafood. Student will gain experience in 
boning, cutting, and various methods cooking that are appropriate 
to aquatic life. 

3471 Garde-Manger 3 

Studies Garde Manger techniques, including ice and tallow sculptur- 
ing, with emphasis on manipulation of tools. Student will also create 
buffet show pieces, both edible and non-edible displays. 



67 



3474 FirstAid/Sanitation 2 

Studies in detail the principles and practices of sanitation for 
foodservice operations. Includes general cleaning practices, environ- 
mental sanitation, and the scientific principles underlying good 
sanitation practices. Attention is also given to personal hygiene and 
the importance of sanitation from both moral and legal points of view. 

3712 Medical Office Procedures — Clinical 1 4 

Enables the student to prepare patients for routine examinations 
in a physician's office. Demonstrates how to assist with physical 
examinations, take and record vital signs, maintain and prepare 
sterile equipment, and order supplies. 

3713 Medical Office Bookkeeping 4 

Introduces double entry principles of bookkeeping with emphasis 
on the needs of the medical office. 

3719 Medical Typewriting 3 

Focuses on typewriting skills for the medical field, with emphasis 
on medical forms, articles, case histories, and correspondence. 
Includes study of medical terminology. Prerequisite Typing I. 

3721 Medical Office Procedures — Administrative 4 

Covers secretarial, receptionist, housekeeping, and managerial 
duties and responsibilities pertaining to medical offices and health 
care agencies. Includes records management; processing of mail 
scheduling and telephoning; inventory procedures; and financial 
administration. 

3722 Medical Typewriting 1 3 

Develops skills in production typing of letters, forms, manuscripts, 
and tabulations. Emphasis is placed on building speed in typing 
medical letters and case histories, utilizing medical terms. 

3723 Medical Typewriting 2 2 

Emphasizes the development of speed and accuracy. 

3724 Electrodardiogram ■ Basic 

Provides opportunity to learn the fundamentals of EKG technique 
and interpretation of common arrythmias. Student will learn how to 
perform 12 lead EKG. 

3729 Medical Assistant Clinical Externship 4 

Provides opportunities to perform clinical procedures under super- 
vision in selected physicians' offices, clinics, and hospitals. Includes 
weekly seminars to discuss students' learning experiences and 
situations. 

3730 Medical Assistant Laboratory Techniques 4 

Instructs students in the performance of lab procedures, including 
the preparation of patients and the collection and preparation of 
specimens. Familiarizes the student with test purposes, results, and 
norms. 

3732 Medical Office Communications 4 

Develops communications skills required in the medical office. 
Emphasis is placed on human relations. 

3742 Medical Office Procedures — Clinical 2 6 

Provides further instruction in the preparation of patients for routine 
examinations in a physician's office. Includes assistance with 
physical examinations, taking and recording vital signs, maintenance 
and preparation of sterile equipment, and ordering supplies. Atten- 
tion given also to principles of nutrition. 

3743 Machine Transcription — Medical 1 3 

Presents fundamentals of medical dictation and machine transcrip- 
tion. Includes typing of medical reports, study of medical terms, and 
practice in medical correspondence. 



3744 Machine Transcription — Medical 2 3 

Presents fundamentals of medical dictation and machine transcrip- 
tion. Includes typing of medical reports, study of medical terms, and 
practice in medical correspondence. 

3752 Medical Office Procedures — Clinical 3 6 

Emphasizes advanced principles and techniques pertaining to patient 
contact. Includes diagnostic procedures, mathematics for office 
practice and pharmacology, care of stock medications, drug samples, 
and instruments. Instructs also in therapeutic diets. 

3761 Community Health 2 

Studies health service in the community. Discussing the institutional 
components of health care systems, preventive services, and finan- 
cing of health care and manpower. Explores the issues of quality 
environment, including pollution control, and public policy with 
regard to research planning and health problems. 

3763 Medical Office Management 3 

Trains the student in the organization and management of a physi- 
cian's office. Offers study of government health insurance coverage. 

3766 First Aid and Emergency Care 3 

Trains the student to recognize emergency situations, to take an 
appropriate course of action, and to apply first aid. 

3769 Medical Assistant Administrative Externship 4 

Offers supervised work experience in the performance of various 
administrative procedures. 

3771 Medical Insurance 3 

Presents an overview of medical insurance programs. Develops skills 
in handling medical insurance forms and reports. 

4005 Motivation and Learning 4 

Introduces the participant to the field of behavior management in 
various settings. Explores motivational techniques appropriate for 
each age group using a systematic approach. 

4006 Families in American Culture 3 

The impact of change on the role and function of the modern family, 
the nature of the socialization process, and socio-economic, cultural 
and ethnic factors that nurture or inhibit the family's capacity to func- 
tion are areas of study included in this course. 

4010 Human Services 1 4 

Explores the history, philosophy and development of human services. 
It looks at the roles and functions performed by human service 
generalists as well as examining the attitudes and objectives they 
strive to attain. 

4020 Human Services 2 4 

Focuses on intervention techniques in the human service field, 
primarily in the context of working for changes within systems. It 
includes information on program planning, understanding systems, 
and potential legal issues. 

4022 Substance Abuse in Our Society 4 

Provides basic information about alcohol and drugs as well as the 
various laws which pertain to them. It also explores current attitudes 
and practices which pertain to alcohol and drug use, misuse and 
dependence. 

4023 Problems of Alcohol and Drug Addiction 4 

Explores the effects of alcohol and other drugs on the individual 
& families. It will focus on the pharmacological, psychological, & 
emotional effects of alcohol & other drugs as well as the substance 
abusing behavior of various population subgroups. 



68 



4024 Treatment Models 4 

Describes the various treatment models used by chemically 
dependent clients. 

4026 Counseling with Substance Abuse 4 

Explores practice strategies for the worker who counsels chemically 
dependent clients. 

4032 Helping Relationship Techniques 4 

This course will focus upon the development of the helping rela- 
tionship inclusive of the basic values and training involved in the 
area of human services. The importance of the use of good com- 
munication skills is emphasized. This course will describe the help- 
ing process in terms of skills, helping stages and issues involved 
in a helping relationship. It will provide an introduction to major 
theories of helping and specific strategies used by these theories. 

4034 Interviewing and Counseling 4 

Develops skills in interviewing and provides a base for student to 
build a style of his/her own. 

4040 Basic Health Sciences 4 

This course is designed as a holistic overview of the physical, 
psychological and social needs of those people residing in extended 
care facilities. Effective treatment modalities to meet the various 
needs of residents will be addressed. 

4041 Directed Practice I 4 

Offers the student an opportunity to apply acquired values, concepts 
and skills in supervised work experiences at appropriate agencies. 

4042 Introduction to Activity Therapy 4 

This course will prepare the student to choose developmentally 
appropriate activities for children from infancy to early adolescence. 
The emphasis will be on activities that promote physical develop- 
ment and that encourage children to express themselves creative- 
ly. The course will help the student define what are creative activities. 

4043 Recreation for Special Populations 

This course provides knowledge of the nature and etiology of impair- 
ments including developmental disabilities, mental illness, physical 
disabilities and geriatrics and their potential impact upon an 
individual's ability to participate in recreational activities. Techniques 
needed to conduct a recreation program that allows successful par- 
ticipation by an individual with a disability will be explored. 

4050 Group Process & Skills 4 

A study of group dynamics, issues, and behavior. Includes informa- 
tion on group functioning and leadership, guidelines on working 
effectively with a co-leader, and practical ways of evaluating the 
group process. 

4051 Directed Practice 2 4 

Offers the student an opportunity to apply acquired values, concepts 
and skills in supervised work experiences at appropriate agencies. 
Continuation of Directed Practicum 1 (4041). 

4052 Psychology of Aging 4 

This course explores the physical, psychological, and social aspects 
of aging. Participants examine their own feelings about aging as well 
as societal attitudes. 

4053 Physiology of Aging 

This course will focus on the physical changes and common 
pathologies associated with the aging process. It also will focus on 
the psychological and social implications of such changes for human 
behavior. Throughout the course, there will be a focus on health pro- 
motion and disease prevention during the later years. 



4054 Recreation for the Elderly 

This course explores the history, philosophy and development of 
recreation for the elderly. It provides facts, current research and prac- 
tical techniques for conduction of therapeutic recreation programs 
for older adults. 

4055 Nursing Home Administration 4 

This course will explore the history of health care provided outside 
the home, and will give an overview of long-term health care facilities. 
It will examine the rules and regulations of nursing homes resident 
rights legislation, the physical plant requirements, etc. 

4060 Program Planning and Evaluation 4 

This course describes the components of administration of human 
service agencies. It also addresses the practitioner's skills needed 
to be a case manager. You will also be introduced to components 
of social policy development and specific social policy issues in the 
social services field. 

4061 Directed Practice 3 4 

Offers the student an opportunity to apply acquired values, concepts, 
and skills in supervised work experiences at appropriate agencies. 
Continuation of Directed Practice 2 (4051). 

4062 Introduction to Community Organizations 4 

This course identifies the multifold programs and activities of social 
welfare and community services. 

4063 Coordination of Volunteers 4 

This course develops skills and knowledge necessary for produc- 
tive volunteer management. It examines the functions and attitudes 
of a successful volunteer program manager and explores basic skills 
necessary to plan, interest volunteers in, and maintain a successful 
program. 

4065 Human Services Topical Seminar 3 

Explores current topics in the Human Services field. 

4066 Extended Care Facility Activity Directors Course 4 

Explores the philosophy and investigates the development of activity 
programs for residents living in nursing homes. It focuses on offer- 
ing activities which will meet an individual's physical, social and 
emotional needs. It is a state approved course. 

4067 Social Services in Long Term Care 4 

Introductory course designed for individuals who want to provide 
social services in long-term care facilities. Provides practical and 
useful information for working with the elderly population. 

4070 Introduction to In-Home Child Care 2 

4071 Safety In-Home 2 

A course for students training to be Nannies and provide in-home 
care for children. The focus will be on keeping children safe and 
healthy and will include safety proofing the home, cleanliness, first 
aid, and caring for the sick child. 

4072 Professional In-Home Child Care 2 

How to present oneself to an employer, how to negotiate a contract, 
time management, and professional growth. 

4201 Surgical Concepts 2 

Presents selected basic nursing procedures and performance skills. 
Relates aseptic concepts and techniques to the special needs of 
the operating room. Covers preoperative and postoperative care of 
the patient. 



69 



4211 Surgical Techniques 1 10 

Applies the principles of sterile technique to the preoperative, 
operative, and postoperative care of the patient. Includes orienta- 
tion to an ideal situation, patient positioning and transportation, con- 
cepts and anesthesiology, techniques of handling and drapes, care 
of contaminated cases, attention to explosion hazards, prevention 
of infections, processing and preparation of nondisposable items, 
sterilization, instrument identification, suture and needle use, care 
of surgical specimens, record-keeping, surgical preps, and hand- 
scrubbing, gowning, gloving procedures and assisting with cir- 
culating duties. 

4221 Surgical Procedures 1 5 

A study of basic surgical procedure in relation to the total 
physiological aspects of surgical intervention. This includes a 
knowledge of the involved anatomy, existing pathology, surgical 
hazards encountered, the surgical procedure, and a review of the 
total patient care including pre-operative care, diagnostic tests and 
immediate post-operative care. 

4230 Surgical Procedures 2 5 

A study of advanced surgical procedure in relation to the total 
physiological aspects of surgical intervention. This includes a 
knowledge of the involved anatomy, existing pathology, surgical 
hazards encountered, the surgical procedure, and a review of the 
total patient care including pre-operative care, diagnostic tests and 
immediate post-operative care. 

4240 Clinical Applications 3 10 

Clinical experience in the affiliating hospitals will enable the Surgical 
Technology student to correlate the basic principles and concepts 
of theory to the working situation. Experiences include scrubbing 
and circulation on selected major and minor surgical procedures, 
observing and assisting with selected diagnostic procedures, and 
observing and assisting with procedures in related departments. 

4242 Surgical Procedures 3 10 

A study of specialized surgical procedure in relation to the total 
physiological aspects of surgical intervention. This includes a 
knowledge of the involved anatomy, existing pathology, surgical 
hazards encountered, the surgical procedure, and a review of the 
total patient care including pre-operative care, diagnostic tests and 
immediate post-operative care. 

4401 Foundation of Nursing 3 

Presents the art and science of practical nursing, the goals and the 
role of the Licensed Practical Nurse on the health care team. 
Introduced is the concept of the nursing process as practiced within 
the wellness/illness continuum. Aspects of basic nursing care are 
included. 

4402 Collecting, Reporting, and Recording Patient Data 3 

Introduces the collection, reporting, and recording of pertinent 
information, in correct medical terminology, for use in the planning 
of preventative, rehabilitative, and therapeutic care. Focus on holistic 
man's vital sign responses to the internal and external environment; 
on the practical nurse's state on the health continuum, on the nursing 
process, and on the role and responsibility of the Licensed Prac- 
tical Nurse for data gathering and accountability for its 
dissemination. 

4403 Therapeutic Measures 6 

Focuses on the art and science required for the Practical Nurse to 
carry out preventative, therapeutic, and rehabilitative nursing inter- 
ventions requiring advanced skill and knowledge. The nursing 
process as it relates to the role of the practical nurse is integrated 
throughout the course. 



4406 Holistic Approach to Health 3 

Orients the student to the holistic approach to the art and science 
of practical nursing. Included will be holistic aspects of care, the 
wellness/illness continuum, and therapeutic relationships. 

4407 Nutrition 2 

Introduces the basic principles of nutrition and diet, in wellness and 
illness for various age groups. Emphasis is placed upon the role of 
the practical nurse in assisting the patient to meet nutritional needs. 

4412 Endocrine Nursing 2 

Identifies the role of the practical nurse in providing holistic care 
for patients with endocrine conditions. It describes common con- 
ditions on the health continuum and selected nursing interventions, 
by way of the nursing process, in providing preventative, 
rehabilitative, and therapeutic care. 

4415 Cardiovascular Nursing 2 

Identifies the role of the practical nurse in providing holistic care 
for patients with cardiovascular conditions. It describes common 
conditions on the health continuum and selected nursing interven- 
tions, by way of the nursing process, in providing preventative, 
rehabilitative, and therapeutic care. 

4416 Gastrointestinal Nursing 2 

Identifies the role of the practical nurse in providing holistic care 
for patients with gastrointestinal conditions. It describes common 
conditions on the health continuum and selected nursing interven- 
tions, by way of the nursing process, in providing preventative, 
rehabilitative, and therapeutic care. 

4419 Respiratory Nursing 2 

Identifies the role of the practical nurse in providing holistic care 
for patients with respiratory conditions. It describes common con- 
ditions on the health continuum and selected nursing interventions, 
by way of the nursing process, in providing preventative, 
rehabilitative, and therapeutic care. 

4423 Medical-Surgical Clinical Nursing 1 6 

Correlates medical/surgical content and nursing practice. The 
nursing process is used as the basis of decision making within the 
practical nurse role. Emphasis is placed on the holistic aspect of 
man along the wellness/illness continuum. 

4425 Musculoskeletal and Neurological Nursing 2 

Identifies the role of the practical nurse in providing holistic care 
for patients with musculoskeletal and neurological conditions. It 
describes common conditions on the health continuum and selected 
nursing interventions, by way of the nursing process, in providing 
preventative, rehabilitative, and therapeutic care. 

4426 Genitourinary Nursing 2 

Identifies the role of the practical nurse in providing holistic care 
for patients with genitourinary conditions. It describes common con- 
ditions on the health continuum and selected nursing interventions, 
by way of the nursing process, in providing preventative, 
rehabilitative, and therapeutic care. 

4432 Medical-Surgical Clinical Nursing 2 7 

Correlates to medical/surgical content with advanced nursing prac- 
tice. The nursing process is implemented within the role of the prac- 
tical nurse. 

4435 Vocational Issues and Trends 2 

Introduces organizational patterns and the role of the Licensed Prac- 
tical Nurse in the health care delivery system. Emphasis is placed 
on continuing education as a means for maintaining competencies. 
Ethical, legal, and historical aspects are included to develop an 
awareness of the practical nurse. 



70 



4437 Dermatologic and E.E.N.T. Nursing 1 

Identifies the role of the practical nurse in providing holistic care 
for patients with dermatologic and E.E.N.T. conditions. It describes 
common conditions on the health continuum and selected nursing 
interventions, by way of the nursing process, in providing preven- 
tative, rehabilitative, and therapeutic care. 

4438 Gerontology 3 

Focuses on the normal aging process along the wellness/illness con- 
tinuum experienced in the later stage of life. Trends in preventative, 
rehabilitative, and therapeutic care. 

4439 Geriatric Clinical Nursing 3 

Correlates gerontologic content with holistic care of the older adult. 
Implements the nursing process with the role of the practical nurse 
to maintain, promote, and restore health or to prevent illness. 

4455 Maternal/Child Health Nursing 5 

Focuses on conditions and selected nursing interventions based 
on the nursing process, in providing preventative, rehabilitative, and 
therapeutic care for the mother and child. The role of the Licensed 
Practical Nurse is identified in providing holistic care within a 
dynamic environment. 

4463 Maternal/Child Clinical Nursing 4 

Correlates maternal/child health content with the holistic nursing 
care of the mother and child. Emphasis is placed on the normal 
maternity cycle and the normal growth and development of the child 
within the wellness/illness continuum. 

4609 Nursing Procedures for X-ray Technicians 2 

Studies basic nursing care as provided by the radiologic technologist. 
Covers patient-technician relationship, principles such as asepsis, 
isolation, and first aid. 

4613 Radiation Physics 1 3 

Introduces physics as utilized in the production of X-rays. Includes 
physical laws pertaining to atomic structure, chemical properties 
and reactions, and electrical circuitry. 

4620 Orientation to X-ray Technology 4 

Discusses the historical development of X-ray technology and the 
role and function of the radiologic technologist. Studies principles 
of the X-ray tube, properties of radiation, film-processing equipment, 
intensifying screens, terminology, and introductory techniques of 
positioning the chest. Emphasizes procedures and practices of radia- 
tion protection. 

4623 X-Ray Clinical Education 1 4 

Implements Clinical Category 1 of the Competency Model. Includes 
laboratory demonstration and clinical practice. Co-requisite 4624. 

4624 Radiographic Positioning 1 3 

Correlates positioning terminology and techniques and film evalua- 
tion with Clinical Category 1. Demonstrates upper extremity, 
intravenous pyelogram, and gallbladder examination. 

4625 Radiographic Exposures 1 3 

Presents film construction, sensitometry, and processing tech- 
niques. Emphasizes the definition and effect of prime radiography 
factors related to the formulation of exposures. 

4633 Radiographic Positioning 2 3 

Correlates positioning terminology and techniques and film evalua- 
tion to Clinical Category 2. Includes study of low extremity, and 
gastrointestinal system. 



4634 Radiographic Exposures 2 3 

Demonstrates, by means of problem-solving exercises, conversion 
factors affecting the elements of radiographic quality, heat unit deter- 
mination, and technique chart construction. 

4638 X-ray Clinical Education 2 4 

Tests the student's competency skills in Category 1 , and introduces 
Category 2 of the Competency Model laboratory testing. Includes 
supervised clinical experience. Co-requisite 4633. 

4642 Imaging Techniques 3 

Presents theories, principles, and demonstrations of current image 
modalities, including the image intensifier, tomography, ultra sound, 
and CT Scan, Magnetic Resonance Imaging. 

4643 Radiographic Positioning 3 3 

Correlates positioning terminology, techniques, and film evaluation 
to Clinical Category 3. Includes the vertebral column, bony thorax, 
and mammography. 

4648 X-ray Clinical Education 3 4 

Introduces Category 3 of the Competency Model laboratory testing, 
while competency skills over Category 2 are tested. Implements a 
skill maintenance program and continues clinical application. 
Corequisite 4643. 

4650 Radiographic Positioning 4 3 

Correlates positioning, terminology, anatomy and techniques and 
film evaluation for skull procedures. Specialty procedures are also 
presented including myelography, pelvimetry, foreign body location. 

4655 X-ray Clinical Education 4 6 

Introduces Category 4 of the Competency Model in laboratory 
testing, while competency skills over Category 3 are tested. Con- 
tinues maintenance of skills over previous categories during clinical 
applications. Co-requisite 4650. 

4668 X-ray Clinical Education 5 6 

Completes Category 4 of the Competency Model in laboratory 
testing. Continues skill development in all previous categories and 
clinical applications. 

4672 Radiobiology 3 

Presents theory and principles of the effects of ionization radiation 
upon living tissues. Includes a review of dosage measurements, DNA 
structure and function, and cellular radiosensitivity, protection for 
patient and personnel. 

4678 X-ray Clinical Education 6 6 

Completes all category testing. Continues skill development in all 
categories. 

4685 General Examination Review 4 

Reviews contents of program, emphasizing anatomy, physics, 
exposure principles and positioning. Simulated American Registry 
tests prepare the student for the certification examination. 

4688 X-ray Clinical Education 7 6 

Includes final competency testing for students who have not com- 
pleted X-ray Education 6 (4678). Continues skill maintenance over 
all categories. 

4699 Radiographic Quality Assurance 3 

Presents theories and practices pertaining to the establishment of 
department exposure standards. Includes equipment tests for 
reliability, problem solving, reject analysis, and cost containment. 
Offers practical experience in processor monitoring, record-keeping, 
and radiographic quality control tests. 



71 



4812 Respiratory Therapy Science 1 6 

Presents a brief history of respiratory care; the principles and prac- 
tices of oxygen administration; an introduction to manual 
resuscitators; equipment cleaning and sterilization techniques; 
humidity and basic aerosol therapy; and gas analyzers. Emphasis 
is placed on safety. 

4813 Nursing Techniques 2 

Includes patient needs, asepsis, clean and sterile techniques, body 
mechanics, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, physical assessment, 
vital signs, isolation techniques, medical terminology and medical 
records. 

4814 Advanced Respiratory Care 4 

Presents in-depth approaches to the respiratory care management 
of critically ill neonatal, pediatric, and adult patients. Special 
emphasis is placed on techniques of patient evaluation, monitor- 
ing, transportation, and management. 

4815 Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology 3 

Studies in-depth etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, therapeutics, 
and prognosis of disease conditions as they relate to respiratory 
care. Special emphasis is placed on physiologic interrelationships 
of body systems, for example, the cardiopulmonary, the renal, and 
the central nervous systems. 

4816 Cardiopulmonary Monitoring 3 

Presents an in-depth study of the equipment, techniques of data col- 
lection, and the interpretation and evaluation of the data used in 
invasive and non-invasive monitoring of the cardiopulmonary system. 

4820 Cardiopulmonary Physiology 4 

Studies the cardiopulmonary system. Includes ventilation, perfusion, 
gas exchange, introduces blood gases, acid base regulation, and 
physiologic monitoring. 

4821 Respiratory Therapy Science 2 6 

Studies positive pressure breathing modalities, environmental 
therapy, airway management, incentive spirometry, chest 
physiotherapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, aerosol therapy, and 
respiratory pharmacology; introduces mechanical ventilation. 

4823 Clinical Practicum 1 5 

Provides supervised experience in oxygen, humidity and aerosol 
therapy, and various respiratory care tasks in clinical areas. Contin- 
uing certification in CPR is required. 

4831 Clinical Medicine 4 

Introduces etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, therapeutics, and 
prognosis of selected pulmonary diseases. 

4833 Clinical Practicum 2 8 

Provides supervised experience in selected therapeutic modalities, 
establishment and maintenance of artificial airways, and cardio- 
pulmonary diagnostic procedures. Specialty rotations in the areas 
of neonatal intensive care, pediatrics, cardiopulmonary rehabilita- 
tion and home care may be included. Continuing certification in CPR 
is required. 

4835 Respiratory Therapy Science 3 6 

Introduces concepts and techniques of critical respiratory care of 
adults and infants. Studies adult, pediatric, and neonatal mechanical 
ventilators. 

4841 Clinical Practicum 3 5 

Provides additional supervised experience in the therapeutic 
modalities practiced in Clinical Practicums 1 and 2. Specialty rota- 
tions may include, but are not limited to, the areas of inservice educa- 
tion, cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, neonatal, pediatric, and/or adult 
critical care, and home care/extended care. Continuing certification 
in CPR is required. 



4844 Cardiopulmonary Laboratory Diagnosis 4 

Introduces the function of the cardiopulmonary laboratory and pro- 
vides an understanding of basic cardiopulmonary function tests and 
techniques. Includes basic blood gas analysis and interpretation, 
and the study of medical laboratory data. 

4850 Therapist Practicum 1 7 

Provides supervised advanced clinical experience in neonatal, 
pediatric and adult critical care and experience in advanced car- 
diopulmonary diagnostics, for example, electrocardiography, 
echocardiography, pulmonary function testing, arterial blood gas 
analysis, and specialty rotations. Continuing certification in CPR is 
required. 

4851 Therapist Practicum 2 7 

Provides supervised clinical experience in respiratory care manage- 
ment of critically ill neonatal, pediatric and adult patients. Clinical 
experience focuses on integration of the physiologic interrenal, and 
the central nervous systems. Specialty rotations may be included. 
Continuing certification in CPR is required. 

5313 Fire Technology 3 

Examines fire problems and other aspects of the fire technology field. 
Attention is given to characteristics and behavior of fire and to the 
hazardous properties of materials. 

5314 Fire Apparatus 1 3 

Studies the use of all types of fire-fighting apparatus, including aerial 
ladders, pumpers, elevating platforms, hoses, and aircraft fire equip- 
ment. Special attention is given to maintenance of equipment and 
to emergency driving hazards on dry and wet roads. 

5322 Electricity 3 

Introduces basic concepts of electricity for electrical workers. 
Studies include series and parallel circuits, series-parallel combina- 
tions, Ohm's Law, and definitions of electromotive force, current, 
and resistance. 

5323 Fire Apparatus 2 3 

Includes construction, operation, and maintenance of aerial ladders 
and platforms and other specialized equipment. 

5324 Fire Department Hydraulics 1 3 

Treats problems related to public water supply and distribution 
systems, including watermains, hydrants, valves, and fittings. Also 
demonstrates the use of pumpers to ensure adequate supply and 
pressure. 

5325 Fire Department Hydraulics 2 2 

Offers further study of problems pertaining to public water supply 
and distribution. 

5332 Fire-Fighting Strategy and Tactics 1 3 

Prepares the student to make responsible decisions concerning fire 
ground tactics at the battalion or company level. Examines situa- 
tions frequently encountered by the fire fighter. 

5333 Fire Alarm and Protection Equipment 3 

Presents fundamentals of municipal and local alarm systems. 
Examines heat, smoke, and flame detectors; telephone and tele- 
equipment; sprinkler systems; and protective alarm and detection 
systems. 

5334 Fire-Fighting Strategy and Tactics 2 3 

Provides furthertraining in fire ground tactics at both battalion and 
company levels. Emphasis is placed on the tactical simulator. 

5342 Hazardous Materials 1 3 

Reviews basic chemistry and introduces storage of hazardous 
materials, handling laws and standards, and fire fighting practices 
pertaining to hazardous materials. 



72 



5343 Rescue Practices and Procedures 3 

Various rescue practices and procedures are addressed. Ropes and 
knots as employed in rescue are included. Protective breathing 
apparatus and search and rescue are part of the course's focus. 
Ladder practices and procedures are part of the content. Safety as 
a component of the fire-fighter's rescue performance is stressed. 
Various hazards where rescue would be necessary are presented. 
Prerequisite 5334. 

5350 Applied Chemistry 2 

Studies the fundamentals of chemistry, including solutions, acids 
and bases, chemical kinetics, and equilibrium. Introduced are 
organic, bio-, and industrial chemistry. Applications to Applied Fire 
Science program are stressed. Prerequisite 8307. 

5351 Industrial Safety and Fire Control 3 

Studied are the principles of combustion; classes of fires; 
characteristics of combustibles, explosions, and backdrafts; tech- 
niques of fire control; methods of heat transfer; flashpoint burning 
point; ignition temperature; vapor density; use of tools and equip- 
ment; safety procedures; and protective clothing and breathing 
apparatus. Prerequisite 8307. 

5352 Hazardous Materials 2 3 

Continues study of Hazardous Materials 1. Prerequisite 5342. 



5431 Light Construction Layout 3 

(This is the second part of the residential project.) A continuation 
with the design of a residential structure with emphasis on exterior 
materials, roofs and elevations. The building site will be evaluated 
and plot plan constructed. Door, window, and room finish schedules 
will be developed with appropriate details. 

5432 Mechanical and Electrical Equipment 3 

Focuses the student's attention on the mechanical and electrical 
layout drawings required for this residential project. An electrical 
plan; plumbing plan; plumbing requirements and heating and cool- 
ing system are discussed. Prerequisite 5433. 

5433 Light Construction Detailing 3 

(This is the last part of the residential project.) A continuation with 
the design of a residential structure with emphasis on detailing. 
Bathroom and kitchen elevations are drawn locating fixtures and wall 
finish materials. Detailed sections through the stairways and 
fireplace are made identifying the structural components. 

5440 Medium Construction Presentation Drafting 3 

(This is the first part of a commercial building project.) An introduc- 
tory course covering the space and use requirements for a commer- 
cial concrete structure. Emphasis is placed on masonry units, poured 
concrete and precast members. Prerequisite 5433. 



5353 Fire Investigations 4 

Study is focused on the responsibility of the firefighter, investigator, 
and department in fire investigations, fire cause and loss, collec- 
tion and preservation of evidence, and determination of fire origin. 
Emphasis is on the application and assistance of various scientific 
acids to the investigation. Prerequisite 5313. 

5360 Fire Service Inspection 4 

Studies the organization and function of fire prevention and inspec- 
tion; including hazards and the enforcement of codes and laws. 
Prerequisite 5313 and Corequisite 5363. 

5362 Fire Department Specifications 4 

This course consists of specifications of equipment and apparatus, 
buildings, and other necessary sources/materials/etc, that a depart- 
ment must have. Regulations will be included. Prerequisite 5323. 

5363 Fire Prevention 4 

Covered are effects of public relations on fire prevention. The 
organization and function of the fire prevention organization, 
including inspections, surveying and mapping procedures is con- 
sidered. Life codes and other relevant codes and ordinances are 
presented for study. Prerequisite 5313 and Corequisite 5360. 

5364 Legal Problems in Fire Science 4 

Studies law governing organization and operation of fire depart- 
ments, liability, mutual aid, arson, fire prevention, building construc- 
tion, employee relations-labor relations, and insurance. Prerequisite 
5353. 



5441 Medium Construction Layout Drafting 3 

(This is the second part of the commercial project.) A course conti- 
nuing the design of a concrete and masonry structure with emphasis 
on the wall sections and building elevations. Prerequisite 5433. 

5442 Medium Construction Detail Drafting 3 

(This is the third part of the commercial project.) Introduces the stu- 
dent to the development of floor and roof plans, features, and 
scheduling. 

5450 Heavy Construction Presentation 3 

(This is the fourth part of the commercial project.) An introductory 
course which allows the student to construct a two-point perspec- 
tive (rendered) to be used as a title sheet and also a site (plot) plan 
of the property. Prerequisite 5442. 

5451 Heavy Construction Layout 3 

(This is the fifth part of the commercial project.) The project includes 
floor and roof framing plans, elevations and a plot plan. Prerequisite 
5442. 

5452 Estimating 3 

Presents concepts and principles of quantity takeoff of building 
materials as required by construction contractors. 

5453 Heavy Construction Detail Drafting 3 

(This is the sixth part of the commercial project.) The student will 
study and develop electrical, plumbing, and mechanical (HVAC) 
plans. 



5422 Residential Construction Materials 3 

Acquaints the student with the architectural and structural construc- 
tion materials used in residential and small commercial buildings. 
These materials, their sizes, applications and alternatives are studied. 

5430 Light Construction Presentation 3 

(This is the first part of a three-part project.) An introductory course 
in the design of a residential structure with emphasis on size and 
space relationships. Individual rooms, traffic patterns, zones and 
exterior styling are considered. A working floor plan, foundation plan 
and wall section will be developed. 



5454 Interactive Computer Aided Design (CAD) 3 

Lab course designed to increase a student's speed using the com- 
puter and to further develop the student's prior basic computer skill. 
This course will challenge the student to apply computer graphics 
to advanced drafting problems. Prerequisite 5456. 

5455 Architectural Computer Aided Design 3 

Advanced computer graphics course deals exclusively with architec- 
tural type drawing. An extensive use of figure parts will be created 
and called upon for insertion and manipulation. Layering schemes 
are devised for easy graphic insertion. Prerequisite 5457. 



73 



5456 Computer Aided Design Fundamentals 3 

This introductory course assumes you are a proficient draftsman, 
but have no prior computer graphics experience. This course will 
familiarize you with the command syntax, two dimensional graphics 
generation, text and basic dimensioning. Prerequisite 7581. 

5457 3-Dimensional Computer Aided Design 3 

Advanced course in computer graphics which involves parts struc- 
turing, multiview generation, three-dimensional commands, work- 
ing surfaces, library parts and execute files. Prerequisite 5454. 

5459 Computer Aided-PC Board Design 3 

Instructs in electrical schematics, schematic symbols, and printed 
boards. Offers laboratory experience in using the circuit board. 

5471 Surveying Theory 3 

Presents theory and techniques of surveying, including the use and 
care of the level, transit, and other surveying equipment. 

5475 Topographic Map Drafting 3 

Provides experience in topographical surveying, methods of 
establishing grades, and estimation of quantities required for cuts 
and fills. 

5478 Specifications and Codes 3 

Covers contract documentations and specifications as they relate 
to building plans, local codes, and acceptable techniques. 
Prerequisite 5422. 

5497 Computer-Aided Architectural Detail 3 

Continuation of detailing begun in 5455, with emphasis on structural 
detailing. 

5601 Basic Body Repair 1 2 

This course deals with the characteristics of body metals and the 
installation of molding, ornaments, and fasteners. 

5602 Basic Body Repair 2 2 

The care and use of hand and power tools and equipment, with 
emphasis on tool and shop safety is presented. Also included is the 
analysis of damaged sheet metal. 

5603 Basic Body Repair 3 2 

Studied are the advanced techniques of body repair, with emphasis 
on grinding, picking, filing and plastic applications in the repair of 
minor damage. Prerequisite 5602. 

5604 Basic Body Repair 4 2 

Skills used in preparing automobile for painting; cleaning, masking 
and sanding are introduced. Prerequisite 5602. 



5609 Basic Body Repair 1 Practicum 

Supplements Basic Body Repair 1. Co-requisite 5601. 



1 



5611 Collision Damage Repair 1 2 

This study prepares students to analyze extensive body damage and 
to determine the tools and procedures needed to replace panels. 
Prerequisite 5602. 

5612 Collision Damage Repair 2 2 

This course continues the study of panel replacement fundamentals, 
with emphasis on skill development. Prerequisite 5611. 

5613 Collision Damage Repair 1 Practicum 1 

Supplements Collision Damage Repair 1. Co-requisite 5611. 

5614 Collision Damage Repair 2 Practicum 1 

Supplements Collision Damage Repair 2. Co-requisite 5612. 



5615 Basic Body Repair 2 1 

Supplements Basic Body Repair 2. Co-requisite 5602. 

5616 Automotive Chassis and Accessory Circuits 3 

Introduced are the fundamentals of electrical theory, automotive 
components and circuits and troubleshooting techniques. Emphasis 
is placed on battery construction, function, and operation. 

5617 Suspension and Alignment for Auto Body 3 

This is a study of the suspension and steering parts of an automobile 
and the theory of wheel alignment and wheel balance. Covered are 
the five wheel alignment angles and wheel balance. 

5620 Frame and Chassis 1 2 

This course demonstrates the use of tools and frame machines for 
frame and chassis repairs. Included is the study of terms pertain- 
ing to front suspension and rear axle. Prerequisite 5602. 

5621 Frame and Chassis 2 2 

This course continues the study of Frame and Chassis 1 (5620), with 
emphasis on conditions found in frame damage. Included is the use 
of frame gauges, trim gauges, and other measuring devices. 
Prerequisite 5620. 

5622 Frame and Chassis 3 2 

This study develops skill with equipment used to attach car to frame 
machine. Emphasis is on correction of minor frame misalignments. 
Prerequisite 5621. 

5623 Frame and Chassis 4 2 

Emphasized is the repair of major frame damage. Included are 
inspections, analyses and procedures for restoring body structure 
alignment, and unibody automobiles. Prerequisite 5622. 

5724 Auto Body Welding 1 2 

The applications of welding techniques in the replacement and repair 
of panels, with emphasis on techniques peculiar to automotive body 
repair. 

5625 Auto Paint Shop Practice 2 

Auto painting with emphasis on the handling of material and equip- 
ment is introduced. 

5626 Auto Body Sheet Metal Alignment 2 

This course demonstrates the alignment of sheet metal, doors, 
trunks, and glass, bodysealing maintenance, and elimination of 
rattles. Provided is practical experience in the alignment of all body 
panels and glass, with attention to appearance, operation, and 
finishing (sealing) of parts. 

5630 Collision Damage Appraising 2 

The use of estimation guides, procedures for itemizing damage, 
meaning of abbreviations, numbers of parts, and the use of time and 
money conversion tables is studied. Emphasized are damage inspec- 
tion, recording on estimate sheets, and calculation of costs. 
Prerequisite 5602. 

5632 Auto Paint Shop Practice 2 2 

This course covers theory and procedures pertaining to spot repair 
and total car refinishing. 

5636 Auto Paint Refinishing 2 

This is a continuation of auto painting, including the total refinishing 
of an auto. The course emphasizes treatment of the auto as a com- 
plete unit. 

5638 Glass Installation 2 

This course focuses on different types of automobile glass and their 
uses. How to remove and install front and rear glass, install and 
adjust side glass, bond the rearview mirror support, and use rubber 
channel and synthetic rubber adhesive is included. 



74 



5639 Fiberglass/Plastic Repair 2 

Types of fiberglass and plastic materials used in auto body repair 
are introduced. Both interior and exterior applications are covered. 

5642 Welding Practices/Auto Body 1 3 

This is an introduction to basic welding processes with emphasis 
on safety and procedures as they pertain to the auto body repair field. 

5643 Welding Practices/Auto Body 2 2 

This is a continuation of Welding Practices/Auto Body 1 with 
emphasis on the manipulative skills required in arc and mig welding. 
Prerequisite 5642. 

5813 Automotive Braking System 3 

This is a study of the theory, service, and repair of automotive brak- 
ing systems, and their components. Emphasis is on hydraulic theory 
and the repair of service booster units, master cylinder, wheel 
cylinder, caliper rebuilds, and drum and rotor service. 

5814 Automotive Front End Alignment 3 

Fundamentals of wheel alignment and wheel balance, including each 
of the five wheel alignment angles, steering wheel positioning, 
vehicle tracking, and wheel balancing are studied. Emphasis is 
placed on four-wheel alignment techniques that are required to align 
current model vehicles. 

5822 Engine Tools and Equipment 3 

This study familiarizes students with the tools, machines, and equip- 
ment needed for rebuilding internal combustion engines. 

5825 Electronic Fuel Injection & Emission Controls 3 

This is an intensive study of automobile fuels and carburetion 
systems, and fuel injection systems discussed include port, tuned, 
multi and E.F.I. Students will learn emission control as it applies 
to the fuel system. Emphasis is on the shop procedure necessary 
in determining the nature of troubles developed in the fuel and 
emission systems of the automobile causing air pollutants. There 
is also trouble-shooting of the fuel and emission systems, providing 
a full range of testing, adjusting, tune-up, and replacing experiences. 

5828 Electronic Ignition Systems 3 

The functions of the conventional breaker point ignition system and 
principles of operation and testing are covered in this course. Special 
emphasis is placed on the electronic ignition systems and the varied 
types used in conjunction with computer controls. 

5832 Starting and Charging Systems— Testing 3 

This is an intensive study of the construction, function, and prin- 
ciples of operation of the electrical units of the automobile, including 
batteries, starting motors, generators, alternators, charging systems, 
and regulators. Emphasis is placed on developing a comprehensive 
understanding of all electrical components and systems with special 
emphasis on problem diagnosis and bench repair of units. 
Prerequisite 8304. 

5834 Engine Overhaul 3 

Tear-down, inspection, measuring, cleaning, machining, repair, and 
assembly techniques pertaining to engine overhaul are studied. 
Attention is also given to cooling systems. Prerequisite 5822. 



5836 Engine Overhaul-Practicum 1 1 

This study develops skills in tear-down, inspection, measuring, clean- 
ing, machining, repair, and assembly techniques used in engine 
overhaul. Included is work on cooling and lube systems. Corequisite 
5834. 

5838 Engine Overhaul-Practicum 2 1 

This course develops skills in tear-down, inspection, measuring 
cleaning, machining, repair, and assembly techniques used in engine 
overhaul. Included is work on cooling and lube systems. Corequisite 
5834. 

5845 Advanced Engine Performance 3 

This is an advanced course on the theory, diagnosis, and repair of 
computerized ignitions and fuel systems and of the latest diagnostic 
equipment and procedures. Prerequisite 5828, 5825, Corequisite 5891. 

5847 Automotive Air Conditioning 3 

This is an intensive study of automotive air conditioning, including 
both heating and cooling. Special emphasis is placed on the opera- 
tion and theory of the air conditioning refrigeration system and its 
components. Vacuum and electrical control systems are also 
included. Prerequisite 8304. 

5851 Automotive Accessories and Electronics 3 

This is a basic study of the function, construction, principles of 
operation, and troubleshooting techniques for the varied accessories 
of automotive vehicles, to include windshield washers and wipers, 
power seats, power windows, adjustable steering wheels, power 
tailgates, headlights, speedometers, etc. Specific automotive 
applications include: installation of radios, antennas, speaker 
systems, operation and maintenance of lighting and signaling 
systems, headlight dimmers, electrically operated safety devices, 
buzzers, flashers, electric motor operated devices, door adjustment 
and glass installment. Prerequisite 8304. 

5854 Automatic Transmission Theory and In Car Service 3 

This is a lecture-laboratory course in automotive transmission which 
includes construction, function, and principles of operation. 
Emphasis is placed on power flow within the transmission. Includes 
pressure checks and in car service procedures. 

5856 Automatic Transmission Overhaul 3 

Emphasis is placed on practical work experience in the lab. Students 
will learn to overhaul automatic transmission and transaxle 
assemblies and test the units on an automatic transmission 
dynamometer. Prerequisite 5854. 

5858 Automatic Transmission 4 Overhaul 1 

This is a continuation of course 5856. Emphasis is placed on prac- 
tical work experience in the lab. Students will learn to overhaul 
automatic transmission and transaxle assemblies and test the units 
on an automatic transmission dynamometer. Corequisite 5856, 5873. 

5862 Comprehensive Diagnosis and Procedures 1 3 

This course develops advanced skills in diagnosis and in major and 
minor repair to journeyman's standards in a minimally supervised 
work environment similar to that of an automotive service center. 

5865 Automotive Service Organization and Management 4 

This course includes shop organization and duties of service advisor. 
Handling of customers, inventory, and buying practices will be 
covered. 



5835 Manual Transmission & Transaxle 3 

This course studies theory, operation, troubleshooting, and the repair 
of the power train, with emphasis on operation and maintenance 
of clutches and manual transmissions. Includes front and rear wheel 
drives. 



5866 Occupational Health and Safety 4 

This course covers safety related items in auto service. Student will 
be Red Cross certified in first aid. 



5873 Automatic Transmission Overhaul Practicum 2 



1 



75 



5891 Computerized Engine Control Systems 3 

This is an intensive study of computerized ignition, carburetion, fuel 
injection, and ignition sensors used on late model U.S. passenger 
cars. This course will cover theory, diagnosis, and the repair pro- 
cedure of command control, M.C.U., EEC IV, lean burn and spark 
control systems. Corequisite 5845. 

6001 ' Carpentry Fundamentals 3 

This course presents the history of the carpentry trade, traditional 
and progressive building techniques, and current construction 
methods and trends. Corequisite 6002. 

6002 Construction Tools and Skills 3 

The use of various types of construction tools is studied. Emphasis 
is on safety, maintenance, and skill development. Corequisite 6001. 

6003 Construction Materials 3 

The materials used in the building industry are covered and studied 
in depth including the manufacturing process and systems of 
purchasing. 

6011 Floor and Wall Layout and Construction 3 

Covered are the design and construction of floor and wall systems. 
Skills needed for layout are developed. Prerequisite 6001, 6002. 

6012 Roof Construction 3 

The course covers the design and construction of roof systems. Use 
of the framing square is emphasized. Prerequisite 6002. 

6014 Electrical Wiring Fundamentals 3 

This course covers basic electricity, including electron theory, Ohm's 
Law, use of electrical measuring instruments, simple series and 
parallel circuits, switching devices, and fusing. 

6022 Plumbing Design and Installation 1 3 

Presents techniques for working with pipes and fittings. 
Demonstrates how to rough in plumbing and install drainage, water 
systems, fixtures, and water heaters in compliance with the plumbing 
code. 

6024 Plumbing Fundamentals 3 

The operation and function of the home plumbing system is studied. 
Introduced are pipe drawings and isometric pipe layout, blueprint 
symbols, and use of an architect's scale. 

6026 Advanced Skills in Masonry 3 

Building of corners, wall reinforcing, masonry supports, chases, 
small one-flue chimneys, corbelling, and wall copping are covered. 
Emphasis is on residential veneering, cavity wall construction, con- 
crete reinforcement and special finishes. 

6027 Masonry Estimating and Specifications 3 

This course covers masonry specifications, line and symbol identifi- 
cation, and dimensioning and scaling in working drawings. Emphasis 
is on residential construction. 

6031 Electrical— Commercial Wiring 3 

Introduced are wiring methods and materials in conformance with 
the National Electrical Code. The fundamentals of mechanical and 
electrical installations, with emphasis on tool usage and material 
selection are included. 

6036 Masonry and Concrete Fundamentals 3 

This study includes materials and methods of construction, building 
layout preparation of the building site, footings and foundations, 
and wall construction, with form construction and erection. 
Emphasis is on the use of masonry tools and materials and the 
properties of brick and concrete block. Prerequisite 6002, 6003. 



6062 Wall and Floor Coverings 3 

Studies modern interior floor and wall covering materials and the 
procedures used in installing them. Illustrates how different materials 
may affect decor. Includes assessment of the durability of commonly 
used materials and instruction in maintenance. 

6410 Basic AC/DC Circuits 4 

6413 Fabrication 3 

The techniques in diagramming electronics circuits are studied 
including lettering, view identification, and symbol recognition. 
Additionally, electronic fabrication principles including safety, com- 
ponent identification, hand tools, printed circuit board layout and 
assembly, and soldering skills are covered. 

6420 Introduction to Data Processing & Computers 3 

This course is an introduction to the architecture of a modern com- 
puter with emphasis on hardware and various software. Terminology 
is stressed. The hands-on approach is taken. 

6434 Introduction to Active Devices 3 

The basic structure and principles of operation of vacuum tube and 
transistor devices are introduced. Active and passive components 
in power supply and amplifier circuits are studied. Prerequisite 6470. 

6435 Electronic Circuits 1 3 

This course studies use of active and passive components in power 
supply, oscillator and amplifier circuits. Prerequisite 6434. 

6446 Integrated Circuits 3 

Theory, operation and construction of linear integrated circuits are 
studied. Emphasis is placed on the operational amplifier and its 
applications. Prerequisite 6434, 6435. 

6447 Special Semiconductors 3 

Theory and operation of semiconductor devices other than the 
bipolar transistors are introduced. The course includes opto- 
electronic components, FETs, and other special semiconductor 
devices. Prerequisite 6434. 

6451 Communications Electronics 1 3 

This course studies AM receiver and transmitter principles and cir- 
cuits in order to develop an understanding of amplitude modulation. 
Prerequisite 6435. 

6452 Communications Electronics 2 3 

This course studies FM receiver and transmitter principles and cir- 
cuits in order to develop an understanding of frequency modulation. 
Prerequisite 6454, Corequisite 6451. 

6453 Communications Electronics 3 3 

The operation and maintenance of commercial AM, FM, and televi- 
sion broadcast equipment and antennas is studied. Included is the 
study of link transmitters. Prerequiste 6451, 6452. 

6454 Electronic Circuits 2 3 

This course presents pulse and logic circuit fundamentals, including 
waveforms of the non-sinusoidal variety frequently used in pulse 
and logic circuits. Prerequisite 6434, 6447. 

6455 Circuit Analysis 3 

This is a study of system and network analysis techniques. Emphasis 
is placed on circuit principles, electronic axioms and theorems for 
both alternating current and direct current circuits. Prerequisite 6470, 
6471. 

6460 Microwave and Radar 3 

Studies microwave generators, waveguides, relay systems, and com- 
ponents, including klystrons, magnetrons, gas diodes, and their 
applications. 



76 



6461 Antennas and Wave Propagation 3 

This course studies the history and current application of anten- 
nas and their related components. Satellite receiving antennas 
are covered in detail. Prerequisite 6453. 

6470 AC Fundamentals 6 

This study provides a working knowledge of the electrical prin- 
ciples and laws pertaining to alternating current. Voltage, current 
and resistance relationships as applied to alternating current are 
emphasized. The relationship of inductance and capacitance to 
alternating current circuitry is included. Prerequisite 6471. 

6471 DC Fundamentals 6 

This course studies electrical principles and laws, pertaining to 
direct current circuits. In addition magnetism, capacitance and 
inductance, as related to DC, are covered. Component identifica- 
tions, proper use of lab equipment, and interconnection of cir- 
cuit components are included. 

6472 Optoelectronics 3 

Selected topics of optoelectronics are covered. 

6475 Protocol for Data Communications 6 

This course covers the installation, operation and repair of com- 
munication systems, such as computer networks, and PBXs. 
Prerequisite 6584. 

6502 Digital Troubleshooting 4 

Techniques of logical troubleshooting of digital circuits are 
studied. Includes interpretation of schematic diagrams for both 
combinational and sequential logic circuits. Also covered are the 
isolation of faults to the piece part level and introduction of 
highspeed test equipment commonly used to locate faults. 
Prerequisite 6520. 

6520 Microprocessors 1 3 

This course introduces the microprocessor, including the architec- 
ture of a typical processor, addressing modes, programming 
model, and instruction set. Number systems, codes, and com- 
puter arithmetic are reviewed. Prerequisite 6577, 6578, 6420, 
Corequisite 6533. 

6524 Troubleshooting Techniques 3 

Techniques of logical troubleshooting of electronic circuits and 
simple systems, with emphasis on signal tracing and signal in- 
jection methods are studied. Communications skills are includ- 
ed. Prerequisite 6452. 

6527 Peripherals 1 3 

This is a study of peripherals commonly used with small 
machines, including keyboards, LED display, cassette recorders, 
disc drives, and teletype. Prerequisite, 6520, 6533, Corequisite 
6535. 

6533 Microprocessors 2 3 

This course studies support devices and interfacing with simple 
I/O devices. Included are monitor programs, memory, and machine 
language programming. Prerequisite 6577, 6578. Corequisite 6520. 

6535 Peripherals 2 3 

Credit card readers, CRT displays, and paper-tube and floppy disk 
devices are examined. Included are the study of each device and 
the interfacing with typical small machine I/O port devices. Prere- 
quisite 6520, 6533, Corequisite 6527. 

6538 Rotating Machines 1 3 

Introduced are common industrial rotating machines, both single 
and polyphase. Prerequisite 6470. 



6539 Rotating Machines 2 3 

This course offers further study of industrial rotating machines, 
with emphasis on power distribution. Prerequisite 6470, 
Corequisite 6538. 

6543 Basic Industrial Electronics 3 

The characteristics and applications of various measuring and 
process control instruments that are found in industrial situations 
are studied. The calibration, hook-up and application of these 
instruments as well as transducers are included. Prerequisite 6446. 

6544 Introduction to Industrial Controls 3 

The basics of industrial controls are studied as related to industrial 
electronics. Included are basic and pilot control devices and cir- 
cuit protection will be covered. Prerequisite 6538, 6539. 

6547 Linear Integrated Circuits Applications 3 

Emphasized are circuit applications of linear ICs, including op 
amps, voltage regulators, and other analog circuits. Prerequisite 
6447, 6454. 

6553 Industrial Electronics 1 3 

This course studies electronic systems and circuits. Prerequisite 
6543, Corequisite 6554. 

6554 Industrial Electronics 2 3 

This course studies process controls and service systems. Pre- 
requisite 6543, Corequisite 6553. 

6562 Digital Principles 1 3 

Combination logic through use of Boolean algebraic expressions, 
logic gates and binary numbers are studied. Prerequisite 6470, 
Corequisite 6563. 

6563 Digital Principles 2 3 

This is a continuation of Digital Principles 1 (6562) with emphasis 
on counters, clocks, registers, and arithmetic circuits. Prerequisite 
6470, Corequisite 6562. 

6577 Digital Principles 3 3 

This is a continuation of the courses Digital Principles 1 (6562) 
and Digital Principles 2(6563). The basic concepts of logic, cir- 
cuits are applied to arithmetic, control and computer circuits. Em- 
phasis is placed on counters, clocks, registers, memory; digital 
to analog and analog to digital conversions. Prerequisite 6563, 
Corequisite 6578. 

6578 Digital Applications 3 

This course studies interfacing and use of various digital devices, 
circuits and systems. Prerequisite 6435, 6563, Corequisite 6577. 

6584 Telecommunication Principles 3 

This course studies data transmission systems. 

6901 Manufacturing Process 3 

This course offers the student an opportunity to become familiar 
with manufacturing process, equipment, selection of materials, 
and capabilities of modern machine tools. Basic method of 
fabrications as well as measurement and gauging devices to en- 
sure their accuracy are also studied. 

6903 Sensor and System Interfacing 3 

The operation and application of limit switches, photoelectric and 
proximity sensors is included. The interfacing of all discrete sen- 
sors with robot controllers and programmable controllers is 
covered along with basic interfacing techniques used in digital 
network. 



77 



6905 Robotics Principles 1 3 

This course provides an overview of the current robotics industry 
starting with a brief history which is followed by a review of the basic 
terms used in the field. The robots are classified by geometry, power 
source, application, path control and intelligence. Includes opera- 
tion of different types of end effectors, robot controllers and system 
sensors. Lab experiments with robotic trainers. 

6907 Robotics Principles 2 3 

The operation and programming of several full-size robots are 
covered. Lab experiments using the Adept, Asea, Milacron T3 and 
Unimate robot are performed to reinforce lecture material. 

6909 Fundamentals of CAD/CAM 3 

The student is introduced to the principles of computer-aided draft- 
ing and design and computer-assisted manufacturing. Fundamen- 
tals of programming CNC equipment is taught using hands-on 
laboratory methods with actual CNC equipment. Various types of 
CAD/CAM systems will be introduced in this class. 

6911 Work Cell Design 3 

The basic principles used in the design and implementation of robots 
in industrial work cells are covered. The course includes selection 
of the best work-site, selection of the robot system, application of 
cell sensors, development of cycle times, economic analysis, safe- 
ty consideration, proposal preparation and human resources develop- 
ment. Prerequisite 6905, 6907. 

6913 Automated Manufacturing Systems 1 3 

Presents basic concepts of hard automating systems and automated 
assembly. Attention is given to production models, manufacturing 
operations and plant layout. 

6915 Automated Manufacturing Systems 2 3 

Covers the identification, operation and application of the many 
systems integrated into flexible manufacturing systems. Attention 
is given to material-handling hardware; forming, shaping, and 
processing machinery, automatic warehousing and storage equip- 
ment; and CAM control systems. 

6917 Advanced Robotic Systems 3 

An advanced course covering communication, machine vision, tac- 
tile feedback and other advanced topics. An advanced robotic design 
project is also expected from each student by the end of the quarter. 

6919 Manufacturing System Control 3 

An introductory class into control systems. Topics include relay lad- 
der logic, programmable controllers and direct computer control. 
Extensive lab work reinforces theoretical concepts. 

6921 Failure Analysis Techniques 3 

The course covers the procedures that are used to isolate faults in 
highly automated manufacturing systems. Troubleshooting tech- 
niques which identify the system problem in the shortest time will 
be emphasized. Prerequisite 6903. 

6923 Applied Mechanisms 3 

A study of principles, concepts, and applications of industrial 
mechanisms. This includes chain drives gear, ball screws, belt drives, 
couplings, and bearings. Operational principles, uses, maintenance 
and procedures for repair and replacement are included. 

6925 System Project 2 

Offers opportunity for each student to apply acquired knowledge 
of automated systems to the resolution of an actual industrial 
manufacturing problem. 



7002 Industrial Laboratory Techniques 

Virtually every manufacturing or industrial service facility uses a 
laboratory in some part of their production, quality control, or 
research work. Industrial laboratory technicians commonly work in 
and/or supervise such labs. This lecture course will familiarize the 
student with normal activities. Several field trips will be taken to 
local companies in the Indianapolis area. Prerequisite 7013. 

7004 Industrial Instruments and Techniques 1 4 

This is a hands-on industrial laboratory course. Precision measure- 
ment will be studied in detail. Common mechanical, electronic and 
chemical instruments will be used to acquire, summarize, analyze, 
and present data. This first intense hands-on course is good prepara- 
tion for Industrial Instruments and Techniques 2 (7005) and the stu- 
dent's selected minor courses. 

7005 Industrial Instruments and Techniques 2 4 

In this course the student moves from basic data acquisition pro- 
cedures to more advanced, automated ones including computer 
analysis and presentation. New instruments are introduced. Guest 
speakers from industry and field trips are utilized to the maximum. 
On completion of 7005, minor course can be taken with confidence 
that all basic lab procedures are known and understood. 

7006 Environmental Monitoring 4 

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other 
government and non-government environment concerned organiza- 
tions are interested in protecting the ecosystems of the earth from 
harmful changes. Because manufacturing and industrial service com- 
panies use water, air, and a variety of other chemicals in their 
processes, the potential exists for dangerous compounds being 
released into the environment so that humans, animals, plants, and 
non-living things are altered in a harmful way. In the past, there have 
been serious abuses. 

7012 Engineering Graphics 3 

This is a beginning drafting course which studies the principles of 
sketching, shape description, lettering, dimensioning, sectioning, 
and pictorial presentation. Included are the theory and drafting of 
orthographic projection, isometric drawing, electrical schematics, 
and the drawing of charts and graphs. The student will complete 
a variety of data presentation-type and engineering type drawings. 
Computer-aided drafting/design (CADD) will be introduced. 

7013 Introduction to Technology 4 

This course gives the student an understanding of the disciplines 
which make up scientific and engineering fields of study. Specifically 
discussed are physics, chemistry, biology, environmental science; 
and civil, mechanical, electrical, and industrial engineering. The 
theory, principles and practices related to the work of a scientific 
or engineering assistant/aide are introduced. In addition, safety, pro- 
fessional ethics, and use of the scientific calculator/computer as 
a scientific and engineering tool are studied. 

7112 Heating Fundamentals 3 

This course covers fundamentals of the heating phase of air flow, 
temperature measurements, fuels and basic control devices. 

7113 Basic Electricity for Air Conditioning 3 

Basic electricity, including theory of current flow, Ohm's Law, cur- 
rent voltage and resistance measurements, and use of electrical 
measuring instruments is covered. Also included are switching cir- 
cuits, magnetism, transformers, fusing and wire sizing; series, 
parallel and combination circuits, and an introduction to pictorial 
and schematic wiring diagrams. 

7114 Basic Mechanics and Shop Techniques 3 

Safe and efficient use of tools and torches in the installation of cop- 
per tubing and copper and steel piping are introduced. The use of 
soldering, brazing, and oxyacetylene gas welding apparatus in con- 
nection with specific materials is included. 



78 



7123 Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Fundamentals 3 

This is a study of the compression system used in mechanical 
refrigeration and air conditioning. Refrigeration cycle, compressors, 
receivers, evaporators, condensers, metering devices, and 
refrigerants are covered. Also included are temperature conversions, 
absolute temperature, and gas laws. 

7124 Heating Service Gas and Oil 3 

This course deals with gas and oil heating units for residential use. 
Analytical methods for solving mechanical and electrical equipment 
problems are included. Attention is given to pictorial and schematic 
diagrams. Prerequisites 7112, 7113, 7114, Corequisite 7135. 

7125 Motors and Motor Control 3 

Covered are the various types of motors, including single-phase 
capacitor start and run, shaded pole, tab wound, and 3-phase. How 
to select the proper motor for a specific application and how to 
diagnose motor problems. Emphasis on motor control and protec- 
tive devices are included. Prerequisite 7135. 

7126 Air Conditioning and Refrigeration 3 

This is a continuation of Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Fun- 
damentals (7123) covering compressors, condensers, receivers, 
metering devices, evaporators and other system components. This 
course continues study of mechanical service procedures used 
throughout the industry. Prerequisite 7123, Corequisite 7135. 

7127 Heating Service — Electrical and Hydronic 3 

This is a study of electric and hydronic heating systems for residen- 
tial use and the methods used to analyze electrical and mechanical 
problems. Included is a study of control systems using pictorial and 
schematic diagrams. Prerequisite 7135. 

7133 Cooling Service-Electrical 3 

Service procedures for residential air conditioning systems and low 
voltage (24 volts) control wiring are covered. Emphasis is placed on 
schematic and pictorial wiring diagrams. Prerequisite 7113, 
Corequisite 7135. 

7134 Cooling Service-Mechanical 3 

This is a continuation of Cooling Service-Electrical (7133). Covered 
are troubleshooting, procedures for cleaning a system following com- 
pressor burnout, suction and liquid line filters and strainer- 
dehydrators. Prerequisite 7133. 

7135 Electrical Circuits and Controls 3 

Electrical controls, gas controls, oil controls, cooling controls and 
system controllers are included. The operation of individual controls 
and the integration of those controls into control circuits is included. 
Prerequisite 7113, Corequisite 7133. 

7136 Psychometrics 3 

Methods of estimating heat loss and gain in commercial and 
industrial work is studied. Introduced is the use of the psychrometric 
chart in calculating air qualities and quantities. Emphasis is placed 
on selection of equipment and on coil, blower, and sizing. Included 
is a study of ventilation systems. Prerequisite 7143, Corequisite 7137, 
7163. 

7137 Heat Loss and Gain Calculations 3 

Methods of calculating heat loss and gain in sizing of units for 
residential application are included. Attention is given to methods 
of reducing energy consumption in residential applications. Pre- 
requisite 7143, Corequisite 7163. 

7143 Blueprint Reading 3 

The reading of blueprints relevant to the heating and cooling trade 
is studied. Covered are floor plan elevations, sections, details, plot 
plans, and mechanical plans. How to make tracings of blueprints 
and layouts of air conditioning systems are included. Also covers 
the use of symbols, notations, and schedules on drawings. Emphasis 
is placed on lettering techniques and neatness and clarity in drafting. 



7144 Commercial Refrigeration 3 

Light commercial air conditioning and refrigeration systems, 
including medium and low temperature applications are studied. 
Refrigeration accessories, metering devices and mechanical and 
electrical controls are included. Introduced are electrical and hot 
gas defrost systems. Prerequisite 7125. 

7145 Heat Pump Service 3 

This is a study of heat pumps used in residential applications. 
Covered are types of systems, system control, balance points, C.O.P. 
ratings, and pictorial and schematic diagrams. Prerequisite 7134, 
Corequisite 7146. 

7146 Advanced Cooling System 3 

This course covers methods of troubleshooting the electrical and 
mechanical components of central air conditioning systems. Pre- 
requisite 7134, Corequisite 7145. 

7147 Uniform Mechanical Code 2 

This is a study of state and local codes and ordinances covering 
the erection, installation, alteration, repair, relocation, replacement, 
addition to, use of, and maintenance of any heating, ventilation, cool- 
ing, and refrigeration system and their component parts. 

7152 Air Balancing 2 

Measuring air flow in heating, air conditioning, ventilation and 
exhaust systems, use of the instruments utilized in this work are 
studied. The effect of duct sizing on fan brake horsepower, air 
velocities, and noise control will be included. Air balance reports 
will be filled out. Prerequisite 7163, Corequisite 7155. 

7153 Advanced Commercial Refrigeration 3 

This is a continuation of Commercial Refrigeration (7155), including 
work with heavy commercial equipment. Metering devices, 
accessories, and advanced control arrangements are included. 
Stressed are trouble diagnosis and safety precautions in dealing with 
refrigerants and heavy equipment. Prerequisite 7144. 

7154 Duct Fabrication and Installation 3 

This is a study of layout and fabrication of ducts and fittings. Also 
covered is the use of sheet metal hand tools and shop equipment. 

7155 Specifications and Estimating 3 

This course studies the use of job and equipment specifications, 
blueprints and engineering data to stake-off a job and determine the 
cost of materials, labor, and equipment. Overhead, job related costs, 
labor costs plus fringes, warranty coverages, tax, permits, subcon- 
tracts, markups and margins, and estimating of service and 
maintenance contracts are included. Prerequisite 7136, Corequisite 
7152. 

7162 Specialized Environmental Systems 3 

This study covers specialized environmental systems, including heat 
pumps of all types and solar, electrohydronic, heat conservation, 
heat recovery, and temperature and humidity control systems. Pre- 
requisite 7136, Corequisite 7155. 

7163 Air Distribution System Design 3 

Methods used to size cutwork for residential applications are studied. 
Students will make working drawings of various types of duct 
systems. Prerequisite 7143, Corequisite 7136, 7137. 

7165 Advanced Electrical Controls 3 

This course studies more complex control systems than those found 
in the average residential or single-zone commercial installation. 
Included are electronic and solid-state controls, zoning control, 
modulating controls used in larger systems, refrigerant flow, heat 
recovery and economizer control arrangements. Prerequisite 7125. 



79 



7174 Service Organization and Management 3 

This is a study of the operation of a service department, including 
taking service calls and dispatching servicemen, personnel recruit- 
ment and training, truck maintenance, stocking and routing of trucks, 
handling of service tickets, pricing procedures, collection practices, 
warranty parts and procedures, service department overhead, 
customer relations, advertising costs, and service contracts. 

7175 Equipment Sales 3 

Sales engineering as a profession is studied. Sales techniques and 
procedures, the role of manufacturers' representatives, marketing 
through written quotations and proposals, the formulation and 
writing of service contracts and compensation plans for salesmen 
are included. 

7176 Applied Design 4 

Complete air conditioning systems through analysis of a given job, 
including calculation of heat losses and gains, selection of equip- 
ment and layout distribution systems, preparation of working draw- 
ing, and determination of operating and maintenance costs are 
studied. Design and sizing of refrigerant piping, cooling tower pip- 
ing and chilled water-hot water piping are included. Prerequisite 7528, 
Corequisite 7152. 

7310 General Print Reading 4 

The fundamental working drawings used in the trades and crafts are 
studied. Emphasized are the recognition of various types of work- 
ing drawings and developing interpretational skills. 

7320 AC/DC Fundamentals 3 

Studies electrical laws and principles pertaining to AC and DC cir- 
cuits. Includes current voltage, resistance, power, inductance, 
capacitance, and transformers. Prerequisite 8203. 

7321 Wiring for Industry 3 

Introduces wiring methods and materials in conformance with the 
National Electric Code (NEC). Presents fundamentals of mechanical 
& electrical installations with emphasis on tool use and material 
selection. Prerequisite 7320. 

7322 Construction Basics 3 

Studies the use of various types of construction tools. Emphasis 
is placed on safety, maintenance, and application of carpentry, 
masonry, electrical and plumbing principles. 

7323 Heating and AfC Basics 3 

Studies the fundamentals of heating and compression systems used 
in mechanical refrigerations and air conditioning. Attention given 
to combustion process, heat flow, temperature measurement and 
gas laws. Covers heating and refrigeration cycles and components 
used in systems. Introduces basic mechanical service procedures 
used throughout industry. 

7324 Industrial Safety 2 

Provides students with sufficient safety information so that program 
courses may be taken without accidents or incidents. Informs 
students on appropriate first aid measures so that if an accident 
does occur proper action can be taken. Presents detailed informa- 
tion on industrial accident prevention, so that students are 
immediately prepared to practice procedures in their employment. 

7331 Industrial Machine Electrical Circuits 3 

Fundamental single and three-phase alternating current including 
parallel circuits, resistance, inductance, switching, fusing, current 
requirements, transformer applications, and motors and motor con- 
trols as applied to machinery diagrams are studied. Discussed are 
design, wiring techniques, and fabrications of wiring for machines. 
Prerequisite 7320. 



7339 Machine Diagnosis and Repair - Electrical 3 

Studies troubleshooting electrical control circuits with emphasis 
on quickly locating section of circuit containing component troubles. 
Methods for determining which component is defective are covered. 
Prerequisites 7320, 7321, 7331. 

7340 Machine Maintenance 3 

Studies procedures for the removal, repair, and installation of 
machine components. Demonstrates methods of installation, lubrica- 
tion practices and maintenance procedures on industrial machinery. 

7341 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Principles 3 

Covered are principles and functions of fluid power and components. 
Included is study of terminology and the use of repair of equipment. 

7342 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems and Repair 3 

This is a study of hydraulic and pneumatic systems design and the 
use of tools in repairing and troubleshooting hydraulic and 
pneumatic systems. Included are hydraulic and pneumatic valves, 
oils, gauges, fittings, hoses, and other components. Prerequisite 
7341. 

7343 Preventive Maintenance 3 

This course stresses the importance of preventive maintenance for 
industrial equipment including lubrication, maintenance procedures, 
and inspection records. Also studied are the effects of temperature, 
moisture, and corrosion on stored parts and the effects of speeds, 
feeds, machine loads, and gearing on machine performance. 

7344 Power Plant Mechanics 1 3 

Specialized study in power plant mechanics for qualified students 
is presented. 

7345 Power Plant Mechanics 2 3 

Advanced study in power plant mechanics for qualified students is 
presented. Prerequisite 7344. 

7348 Millwright 1 4 

This course introduces hand and power tools and measuring in- 
struments used in carpentry, rigging, and machine and general shop 
work. Corequisite 7349. 

7349 Millwright Shop 1 3 

This course develops proficiency in the use of the trade tools and 
measuring instruments introduced in Millwright 1 (7348) through work 
assignments on general shop, machinist, carpentry, rigging, and 
equipment installation projects. Corequisite 7348. 

7350 Millwright 2 4 

Introduces machinery and related equipment, including drive com- 
ponents, bearings, pumps, packing and seals, turbines, air com- 
pressors, boilers, and mechanical fasteners. Attention is given to 
the selection and use of lubricants. Prerequisite 7348, 7349, 
Corequisite 7351. 

7351 Millwright Shop 2 3 

This course applies mechanical principles to the assembly and 
disassembly of mechanical equipment, including drive components, 
bearings, pumps, packing and seals, air compressors, turbines, and 
other auxilliary equipment. Emphasizes use of maintenance manuals. 
Prerequisite 7348, 7349, Corequisite 7350. 

7352 Troubleshooting Skills 3 

This study introduces systematic and logical approaches to 
troubleshooting. Demonstrated are procedures for both scheduled 
and unscheduled maintenance. 

7367 Programmable Controllers 1 3 

Introduces the basic theory, operations and programming of pro- 
grammable controllers. Prerequisite 7125. 



80 



7375 Utilities Distribution Systems 4 

The student is introduced to common industrial and residential 
utilities distribution systems with emphasis on maintenance of these 
systems and safety precautions associated with these systems as 
well as local code requirements. Opportunity will be given to trace 
incoming utilities from their source to their end uses. 

7381 Equipment Installation and Rigging 3 

Procedures for leveling and aligning equipment and methods and 
tools for moving equipment of various sizes and shapes are 
demonstrated. Included are formulas for calculating mechanical 
advantages and safe working loads for ropes, blocks and tackles, 
and slings. Also demonstrated is the use of ladders, scaffolds, safety 
belts, and life nets for use in maintenance work at various heights. 

7520 Descriptive Geometry 3 

introduces fundamental principles on how to develop graphical solu- 
tions to engineering problems. Areas covered include auxiliary views, 
successive auxiliaries, true length of lines, true shapes of planes, 
and edge views of planes. Prerequisite 7581. 

7521 Industrial Processes and Systems 3 

Offers the student an opportunity to become familiar with manufac- 
turing processes, equipment, selection of materials, and capabilities 
of modern machine tools. Basic methods of fabrication as well as 
measurement and gauging devices to ensure their accuracy are also 
studied. 

7522 Production Drawing 3 

A continuing course in advanced orthographies with intermediate 
dimensioning, tolerancing, and typical machining notations; also 
introduces the student to the various sectioning techniques. 
Prerequisite 7581. 

7528 Drafting for Heating/Air Conditioning 3 

Studies lettering, linework, isometric drawing, and layout of ducts, 
electrical controls and pipes. 

7530 Product Drafting 3 

An introduction to the "set" concept of working drawings (detail 
drawings and assembly). Fastening devices, thread symbols and 
nomenclature, surface texture symbols, classes of fits, and the use 
of parts lists, title and revision blocks are presented. 

7531 Mechanisms and Machines 3 

An advanced course introducing the student to graphical layout, 
analysis and the solution of gear cams, linkages, timing-indexing 
components, belts, chains, sprockets, ratchets, and other mechanical 
devices — their mechanical advantage, resultant motion, and 
mechanical forces involved. 

7532 Tool Drafting 3 

Familiarizes the student with "tooling;" the jigs, fixtures, and gauges 
necessary to improve manufacturing efficiency, accuracy, repeatabili- 
ty, and productivity. Tool component catalogs are used extensively. 

7533 Die Design 3 

Studies the bases of die design as it pertains to the punch press 
and stamping industry. Standard die sets, hardwares, and other die 
standards are taught. 

7540 Product Design 3 

Helps to enlighten the drafting student with regard to good design 
characteristics, including: need, function, esthetics and economy. 

7541 Advanced Tool and Gauge Design 3 

Gives the student an opportunity to research and study advanced 
tooling and gauging practices used in today's automated manufac- 
turing environments. Topics include robotics, LASERS, CAD/CAM, 
and many other automated manufacturing technologies. 



7543 Technical Illustration 3 

Examines the use of isometric and oblique pictorial drawings. From 
basics learned, the student then is instructed on how to illustrate 
a multi-part assembly in an "exploded" pictorial drawing. Basic 
methods of shading are also introduced. Prerequisite 7581. 

7552 Strength of Materials 3 

The basic design principles of various materials and their reactions 
to loads and conditions involving mathematical calculations are 
studied. 

7557 Jig and Fixture Design 3 

In this course the student will be challenged to solve a jig/fixture 
problem from its beginning stages. The course emphasizes the use 
of standard purchasable hardwares and design economy as a means 
to a justifiable solution. 

7558 Sheet Metal Drafting 3 

Provides the drafting student an opportunity to apply Descriptive 
Geometry development skills in the solution of 3-D sheet metal 
forms. Prerequisite 7581. 

7573 Industrial Design Presentation 3 

A challenging course which provides the student an opportunity to 
utilize all previously acquired knowledge in product drafting to the 
design of a new or existing consumer product. The student will con- 
sider the function, esthetics, cost economics and marketability of 
the product. 

7574 Industrial Design Detail 3 

A continuation of 7573. 

7575 NC Data Processing 3 

An introductory course in programming, alpha codes, tape punching, 
and coordinates as they relate to CNC machine tool equipment. 

7578 Piping Fundamentals 3 

Introduces the student to industrial piping terminology, symbols, 
and standards while learning to develop plan/elevation drawings, 
fabrication isometrics, and spooling details. 

7581 Drafting Fundamentals 6 

Introduces the beginning drafting student to equipment usage, 
lettering, sketching, dimensioning fundamentals, geometric con- 
structions, and multiview projection drawings. 

7593 CAD/CAM 3 

This is an advanced course in CAD in which the student learns to 
develop tool path routing. Emphasis is on coordinate layout, layer- 
ing of sub routines, and cycle statements. 

7710 Machine Tool Introduction 3 

This is an entry level course giving the student a comprehensive 
introduction to basic machining practices. Turning, drilling, ream- 
ing and boring operations are included in the exercise. 

7711 Machining Fundamentals 1 3 

The milling machine and related operations are introduced in this 
course. Along with related theory, students will machine a workpiece 
which will include squaring, layout, drilling, reaming and boring 
operations. 

7712 Machining Fundamentals 2 3 

This is an advanced course in lathe operations. Applied shop math 
is utilized in the inspection of a workpiece which includes paper 
turning and thread cutting. Prerequisite 7710. 



81 



7725 Interactive Numerical Control Machining 3 

In this course the student experiences hands-on programming 
challenges where he processes, programs, and machines a 
workpiece using a CNC vertical milling machine. Operations include 
Hurco executive CNC programming cutter compensation, deep hole 
drilling and tapping cycles. Prerequisite 7758-7759. 

7731 Basic Print Reading 3 

Machine shop blueprints are read and interpreted relative to dimen- 
sions, shapes, machining operations, fabrication and assembly. 
Basic mathematics is applied in solving shop problems. Students 
learn to make sketches on the job without instruments and become 
familiar with screw thread notations and welding symbols. 

7733 Advanced Machine Tool Set-up and Operation 3 

The student builds a mechanism from an assigned print and process 
sheet. All previously acquired machining skills are used in the course 
while completing this project. 

7734 Advanced Print Reading 3 

In this course, the emphasis in content is on the various types of 
drawings that can be used to represent parts to communicate 
information in the most economical and precise way possible. 

7740 Specialized Machining Theory 3 

This course teaches or reviews the effective methods of using any 
reference volume. This skill provides some substitute for the years 
of experience that aid the skilled craftsman. 

7758 Numerical Control and Automatic Processing 1 3 

This is an introductory course teaching basic NC/CNC skills aimed 
at the operator level. The student prepares, reads, and runs simple 
programs in both E.I.A. and ASCII systems. The student machines 
a workpiece from a proven program utilizing the editing capabilities 
of the machine to produce preassigned dimensional sizes. 

7759 Numerical Control and Automatic Processing 2 3 

This course acquaints the student with programming skills involv- 
ing geometric and trigonometric functions. Five weeks of the eleven 
class weeks are devoted to intensive applied shop geometry and 
trigonometry review. Prerequisite 7758. 

7760 Numerical Control and Automatic Processing 3 3 

This course advances the programming skills of the student and in- 
cludes turning as well as milling operations. Prerequisite 7759. 

7762 Precision Measurement 3 

Demonstrates techniques of linear and angular measurement, 
methods of application, and uses of precision measurements in 
machine tool production and quality control. 

7769 Numerical Control and Automatic Processing 4 3 

This advanced course deals with three-axis programming, jump, loop 
and sub-routines, threading and grooving in both turning and mill- 
ing operations. Prerequisite 7760. 

7913 Introduction to Environmental Controls 4 

This course presents a general introduction to the entire pollution 
problem relating each type of pollution, including water, air, solid 
waste, population, radiation and noise to each of the others. The 
global environmental dilemma confronting mankind and man's 
impact on the earth's vital resources are discussed. 

7915 Applied Chemistry 1 3 

This study consists of an intensified laboratory training program in 
proper performance of various chemical analyses for awareness of 
tests and procedures necessary to comply with State and Federal 
wastewater effluent standards with tests including: DO, TBOD, 
CBOD, pH, suspended solids, ammonia, phosphorus and chlorine 
residual plus sampling technique and flow measurement. 
Prerequisite 7954. 



7916 Environmental Seminar 1 

Familiarization of the student with current events in the environmen- 
tal field is the primary objective of this course. The class will discuss 
articles submitted by class members and the instructor. 

7926 Applied Chemistry 2 3 

This course is a continuing study of the water/wastewater laboratory 
including procedures on nitrates, phosphates, grease, oil, cyanide, 
phenols and heavy metals. Prerequisites 7915, 7954. 

7934 Basic Hydraulics 4 

This course is an introduction to the collection system for a 
wastewater pollution control facility. The survey lines are looked at 
as well as the manhole installation, cleaning apparatus, maintenance 
and lift stations for the uninterrupted movement of the wastewater 
are discussed. Prerequisites 8204, 8203. 

7942 Applied Microbiology 3 

Laboratory training is given in the areas of applied water and 
wastewater microbiology including milk, food, total and fecal 
coliform, total plate count and inspection of milk and other foods. 
Prerequisites 8307, 7975. 

7943 Water Supply and Treatment 4 

This course studies the basic principles of water purification 
including coagulation, sedimentation, chlorination, treatment 
chemicals, taste and odor control, bacteriological control, mineral 
control, design criteria, maintenance programs and operational pro- 
grams. New processes and recent developments will be discussed. 
Prerequisites 8307, 8203. 

7945 Equipment and Maintenance 1 3 

Electrical terminology, schematic diagrams and circuits as used by 
technicians will be studied. Students will learn how to diagram and 
assemble series, parallel and combination circuits, take 
measurements of electrical values and make basic computations 
for electrical values in series and parallel resistance circuits. 

7946 Applied Research 1 2 

Each student enrolling in this course is expected to research an area 
of interest in environmental science and then write a paper on the 
study. The paper must include the elements of a proper research 
paper, be typewritten and presented to the class. 

7951 Reporting and Purchasing 2 

Training is given in writing job-related reports and letters. Students 
experience library research and preparation of specialized business 
forms such as proposals, letters, and abstracts. 

7952 Management and Supervisory Procedures 3 

Studies employee development, with emphasis upon the respon- 
sibilities of the beginning or newly appointed supervisor. Includes 
functioning within an organizational structure, communications, 
motivations, delegation of authority, interviews, orientation and 
induction, evaluation of new employee performance. 

7954 Plant Operations 1 - Municipal 4 

This is a study of the basic principles of municipal wastewater treat- 
ment including pre-treatment, primary, secondary and advanced treat- 
ment. Discussion topics will include disinfection, sludge handling, 
design parameters and plant control. 

7956 Applied Research 2 3 

This course consists of students researching an area of interest in 
water pollution, experiencing an operating plant and presenting a 
paper regarding the research. 



82 



7957 Community Sanitation 3 

The control of the environment can lead to the protection of human 
health and the promotion of human comfort and wellbeing. Topics 
discussed will include communicable diseases, solid wastes 
disposal, milk and food sanitation, disinfectants, insect vector and 
rodent control, institutional sanitation and occupational health. Field 
trips are planned. 

7958 Equipment and Maintenance 2 3 

Various pumps used in wastewater treatment will be studied with 
emphasis on operation and maintenance. Students will be able to 
identify, disassemble, describe internal parts, explain their function 
and reassemble pump properly in a scheduled length of time. 

7960 Air Pollution Control 1 4 

Fundamentals of air pollution control, including history, effects, air 
pollutants, sources, meteorology, basic thermodynamic concepts 
and air quality criteria are presented. Discussion of industrial 
problems and government regulation, inspection and enforcement 
follows. 

7961 Plant Operations II - Municipal 3 

This course reviews the basics of municipal wastewater treatment 
and then continues to include the special processes of advanced 
wastewater treatment. Emphasis will be placed on ammonia and 
phosphorus removal, process control, filtration, disinfection and 
coagulation. 

7963 Plant Operations III - Industrial 3 

The special problems of industrial wastewater treatment are studied 
with emphasis on major classifications of liquid industrial wastes 
including neutralization, equalization, proportioning and removal of 
troublesome solids. Cyanide and chromium treatment will be 
discussed. 

7964 Plant Mathematics 4 

This course reviews and emphasizes performance in basic 
mathematical skills: whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, 
ratio and proportion, measurements, graphs, english and metric 
systems, and averages. Basic math is applied to typical wastewater 
plant and laboratory calculations as found in the field. Prerequisite: 
7954. 

7966 Hazardous Materials 2 

This is a study of explosive, combustible, corrosive, toxic and 
radioactive substances and the basic chemistry of dangerous 
reactions. 

7967 Occupational Orientation 2 

This course is designed to develop environmental awareness through 
intensive monitoring of all communications media, with guest 
speakers and films introducing students to opportunities in the 
environmental fields of wastewater, water, air, health, noise, etc., 
developing concern, involvement and knowledge of environmental 
problems and career opportunities through group discussion. 

7970 Air Pollution Control 2 3 

This is a continuation of course 7960. Theory and laboratory tech- 
niques for ambient air quality sampling and source sampling are 
studied including sample collection, equipment used for collection, 
maintenance of laboratory equipment, calculation and interpreta- 
tion of results. Prerequisites 7960, 8203, 7913. 

7972 Environmental Administration 4 

A study of the structure of present decision-making, including 
federal, state, local governments and the private sector, relative to 
the environment is made. Environmental law is introduced. 



7973 NPDES Workshop 2 

This course consists of an intense look at the NPDES Permit, how 
to apply for a permit, who must have a permit, what a permit means, 
and what waivers are available for a set of permit conditions. The 
responsibilities of the operator are studied. 

7974 Phosphorus Removal Workshop 2 

Students will become aware of the importance of phosphorus 
removal and the skills to calculate the amount of chemicals to be 
used and methods of application in order to effectively operate a 
system for phosphorus removal. 

8001 Gas Welding 1 3 

Offers instruction in oxyacetylene welding, including gas welding 
techniques, brazing, and flame cutting. 

8010 Arc Welding 1 3 

Demonstrates the welding of ferrous metals and alloys using 
shielded metal arc methods, single and multipass techniques, and 
flat and horizontal positions. Emphasis is placed on safe practices. 

8013 Blueprint Interpretation 3 

Studies interpretation of blueprints pertaining to the welding trade. 
Attention given to metal structures, specifications and assembly 
drawings, special forms of dimensioning, and section views. 

8024 Welding Blueprint Interpretation 3 

Presents advanced study of blueprint interpretation, concentrating 
on welding symbols and their significance in the welding trade. 
Includes process and finish symbols and methods of finish. 

8061 Pipe Welding 1 5 

This course extends the student's welding skills as necessary to 
make high quality welds on open root mild steel pipe in 2G, 5G, and 
6G positions using the SMAW process. Prerequisite 8095. 

8063 Electrical Fundamentals for Welders 3 

This is a study of the relationship between voltage, current and 
resistance in electrical circuits, with emphasis on the use of high 
current transformers in AC and DC circuits. Special emphasis is 
placed on the production of heat as a result of current flow through 
resistance. Also, safety is emphasized when working with electrical 
components. 

8064 Basic Metallurgy 3 

Introduced are the properties and uses of ferrous and nonferrous 
metals and alloys; the production of iron and steel; composition and 
properties of plain carbon steel and alloying elements; selection of 
tool and case hardening steels; and destructive and nondestructive 
testing. Also included are the fundamentals of heat treatment and 
reaction that occur in metals subjected to various heat-treatment 
methods and techniques. 

8066 Introductory Welding 3 

Covers gas and arc applications for occasional users from other trade 
areas. 

8075 Welding Fabrications 1 5 

Basic fabrication covers interpreting blueprints and welding symbols, 
principles of layout and measurement used in fabrication of metal 
products, including tolerances, fits and allowances. Prerequisite 
8097, 8024. 

8090 Shielded Metal Arc Welding 1 5 

The student is provided with a thorough technical understanding 
of arc welding fundamentals, welding safety, electric power sources, 
electrode classification and selection. The course also includes train- 
ing to develop the manual skill necessary to make high quality 
shielded metal-arc welds in three positions on mild steel. 



83 



8095 Shielded Metal Arc Welding 2 5 

Training to develop the manual skills necessary to produce quality 
multipass fillet and groove welds with backing in all positions is pro- 
vided. This course is designed to use the E6010 and 7018 electrodes 
on thick carbon steel plate similar to many structural applications. 
Prerequisite 8090. 

8097 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (TIG HELI-ARC) 5 

The student is provided with a thorough technical understanding 
of gas tungsten arc welding fundamentals, arc characteristics and 
welding safety. Training to develop the manual skill necessary to 
make quality gas tungsten arc welds in all positions on mild steel, 
stainless steel and aluminum is included. 

8098 Welding Certification 4 

This course is designed for the student who has advanced shielded 
metal-arc welding skills. This course will concentrate on preparing 
the student for the A.W.S. Certification Test. Prerequisite 8095. 

8099 Oxyacetylene Welding and Cutting 5 

In this course the student is provided with a thorough technical 
understanding of oxy-acetylene welding, flame cutting, brazing fun- 
damentals and welding safety. Training to develop the manual skills 
necessary to produce high quality welding and cutting techniques 
is included. 

8501-06 Field Study/Co-op Education 5 

The student is given a job assignment related to their Informa- 
tion/Data Management career objectives and/or specialty. The course 
should be a field project within the framework of actual work 
experience in industry or business. 

General Education: Communications/Social Science 

8110 Communications 4 

Develops writing competence. Emphasis is on development of 
multi-paragraph compositions through common rhetorical 
modes such as narration, description, illustration, comparison 
and contrast, and classification. A grammar review and in-class 
written assignments are also required. Meets the requirement 
for communications credit for most A.A.S. programs. 

8111 Business Communications 4 

Stresses effective written communication with emphasis placed 
on such topics as types of letters and memoranda found in 
business environments: research techniques; and the organiza- 
tion, structure and format of business reports. Prerequisite: A 
grade of C or higher in 8110. 

8113 Oral Communications 4 

Improves oral communication skills and formal oral presenta- 
tions. Students are required to present formal speeches — 
demonstrative, informative, persuasive — and participate in a 
panel discussion. In addition, in-class presentations and evalua- 
tion exercises are required. 

8114 Technical Report Writing 3 

Enables students to understand and use fundamental principles 
of written communications within technical environments. 

8117 Effective Listening 2 

Focuses on the process of listening. Topics include: active 
listening and concentration, listening techniques, and over- 
coming barriers. 

8118 Effective Reading 2 

Increases reading speed while maintaining or improving com- 
prehension and retention. Analyzes the student's present reading 
ability and demonstrates techniques for achieving greater effi- 
ciency and effectiveness. 



8401 Human Relations 4 

Helps students improve human relations skills in their personal 
and professional lives. Topics include learning, motivation, 
interpersonal communication, problem solving and adjustment. 
Meets Social Science requirement for most A.A.S. programs. 

8402 Applied Behavioral Psychology 4 

Provides a study of life span and developmental psychology. 
Presents facts, dominant theories, recent research and across- 
cultural perspective of various life stages. 

8405 Social Problems 4 

Provides a fundamental background in sociological topics and 
emphasizes how problems can arise in pluralistic societies. 
Topics focus on personal, social and institutional factors that 
create problems. 



General Education: Mathematics/Science 

8201 Applied Mathematics 1 4 

Reviews fractions, decimals, and percents. Studies integers, 
equations, variation, measurement and formula evaluation. 

8202 Applied Mathematics 2 4 

Continues the study of mathematics with emphasis on 
geometric terminology and rules, construction, area, volume, 
Pythagorean Theorem, instrumentation, statistical graphing, and 
right triangle trigonometry. Prerequisite: 8201 (C grade or higher). 

8203 Technical Mathematics 1 4 

Reviews integers, linear equations and polynomials. Studies 
scientific notation, accuracy, precision, measurement, systems 
of equations and determinants, geometric formulas, angle 
measure, linear and polar coordinates, trigonometric functions 
and right triangle trigonometry. Prerequisite: 2 years high school 
algebra and/or 8223 (C grade or higher). 

8204 Technical Mathematics 2 4 

Continues with the study of oblique triangle trigonometry, fac- 
toring, algebraic fractions, complex and irrational numbers, 
quadratic equations, variation, logarithmic equations, and 
graphing of linear, trigonometric, conic, and logarithmic func- 
tions. Prerequisite: 8203 (C grade or higher). 

8206 Technical Calculus 1 4 

Introduces analytic geometry and differential and integral 
calculus with emphasis on practical application. Prerequisite: 
8204 (C grade or higher). 

8208 Geometry 3 

Studies geometric topics such as fundamental terminology, 
scales and scale drawings, lines, triangles, circles, mensuration, 
congruent and similar figures, polyhedrons, spheres, cylinders 
and cones. 

8209 Trigonometry 3 

Studies angle measure, trigonometric functions, use of 
trigonometric tables and scientific calculators, right triangle and 
oblique triangle trigonometry, and graphing of trigonometric 
functions. Prerequisite: 8203 (C grade or higher). 

8210 Statistics 3 

Studies the collection, interpretation and presentation of 
descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency, probabili- 
ty, binomial and normal distributions, and hypothesis testing 
of one- and two-sample populations. Prerequisite: 8203 (C grade 
or higher). 



84 



8212 Business Mathematics 4 

Reviews equations and percents with emphasis on applications. 
Studies reconciliation of bank statements, simple interest, commis- 
sion, taxes, payroll, discounting paper, credit purchases, installment 
buying, interest rebate, and metrics. 

8213 Mathematics of Finance 4 

Studies merchandise pricing, compound interest, insurance, 
depreciation, inventory, analysis of financial statements, statistical 
graphing, measures of central tendency, and number bases other 
than ten. Prerequisite: 8212 (C grade or higher). 

8227 Computer Mathematics Topics 4 

Introduces algorithms, flowcharting, set theory, symbolic logic, 
Boolean algebra, computer number systems and algebraic 
application. 

8301 Physical Science 3 

Introduces non-mathematical study of the principles of energy such 
as motion, work, and power, electricity and magnetism, heat, nuclear 
power, and other energy sources. Studies the use of energy and its 
effects on the environment and the human population. 

8304 Physics 1 3 

Presents vectors, static equilibrium, Newton's Laws, applications 
of work, force, power, kinetic and potential energy, circular motion, 
momentum, simple machines, elasticity and Hooke's Law, pressure, 
Archimedes' Principle, flow and Bernoulli's equation. Prerequisite: 
8209 (C grade or higher). 

8305 Physics 2 3 

Studies temperature, thermal expansion, gases, heat and heat 
transfer, laws of thermodynamics, vibrations and waves, sound, elec- 
trical forces and fields, electrical energy, current, resistance 
magnetism, direct and alternate currents, reflection and refraction 
of light, mirrors and lenses, and wave optics. Prerequisite: 8204 (C 
grade or higher). 

8307 General Chemistry 3 

Studies the forms and reactions of matter, periodic table, atomic 
structure, bonding, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, solutions and 
gas laws. Chemical nomenclature, calculations and stoichiometry 
are emphasized. 

8308 General Microbiology 3 

Introduces the fundamentals of microbiology. Includes morphology 
and classification of microorganisms, control of microoganisms, 
pathogenicity and host defense, and discussion of bacterial and viral 
diseases of man. 

8310 General Biology 4 

Studies classification and chemistry of life forms, cells, structures 
of plants and animals, human sexuality, genetics, evolution, ecology 
and behavior. 



Skills Advancement: Communications/Social Science 

8151 Introductory Writing 1 4 

Offers much practice in writing, leading from workbook practice to 
paragraphs on positive, personal experiences. Some lecture and 
much individualized tutoring. Students learn by practice rather than 
by rules. 

8152 Introductory Reading 1 4 

Encourages students to develop alternative reading strategies with 
general reading material. Includes vocabulary development and 
stresses improvement of comprehension. Class structure includes 
individual assignments and lecture/discussion activities. 



8153 Introductory Reading 2 4 

Provides vocabulary development and practice with reading/learn- 
ing techniques associated with content materials. The student will 
participate in individual, small group and lecture/discussion 
activities. 

8154 Introductory Reading 3 4 

Corequisite — A program level course in the student's chosen field. 
Develops reading strategies that are directly applicable to a program 
level course. The student will concentrate on reading/learning 
activities designed to assist the translation into program classes. 

8159 Improving Your Handwriting 1 

Improves the student's ability to write legibly. Includes individual 
diagnosis of penmanship faults, demonstration of handwriting 
techniques, and guided practice. 

8160 Introductory Writing 2 4 

Continuing 8151, students practice advanced verb forms through 
extensive varied workbook practice. Slowly through step-by-step 
exercises they master advanced sentence forms and subordination 
in self-generated paragraphs. Emphasis on individualized tutoring. 

8162 Spelling 2 

Independent study using a programmed text. The content of the 
course will be structured to develop application of rules. 

8163 Learning Development 4 

Designed to improve reading comprehension, vocabulary and logical 
thinking skills. 

8164 English as a Second Language Level 1* 4 

Focuses on basic English Grammar for foreign students who have 
little experience in English. Structures and vocabulary geared toward 
beginning students. 

8165 English as a Second Language Level 2* 4 

Focuses on key structures through varied and extensive exercises 
for foreign students who are lower-intermediate and intermediate. 
Promotes situationally appropriate language use. 

8166 English as a Second Language Level 3* 4 

Focuses on English grammar for foreign students who are advanced. 
Presents forms, meanings and usage level (colloquial through formal) 
of basic structures in English. Exercises range from simple manipula- 
tion to situational and idiomatic usage, from controlled response 
to open communicative interaction. 

*ln addition, Special ESL sections are offered for all skills advancement 
language courses. 

8167 Language Skills Development 4 

Designed to strengthen the ability to identify and write complete 
sentences. Emphasis is also placed on dictionary usage, spelling 
and word study. 

8169 Critical Thinking 4 

After becoming familiar with such thinking tools as recognition of 
patterns, cause-and-effect relationships, and considering alter- 
natives, students focus their newly developed thinking skills on 
selecting appropriate career programs suited to their interests and 
abilities. 

8170 Introductory Speech 4 

Designed to help the student become more comfortable and effec- 
tive in the use of oral language as a communication skill. 



85 



Skills Advancement: Mathematics 

8223 Pre-Technical Mathematics 1 4 

Studies integers, linear equations, linear inequalities, monomials, 
polynomials, factoring, irrational numbers, quadratic equations, 
systems of equations in two unknowns and graphing linear 
equations. 

8224 Pre-Technical Mathematics 2 4 

Introduces basic geometric terminology, angle measurement, con- 
struction, formula evaluation, Cartesian and polar coordinates, 
trigonometric functions and simple applications of right triangle 
trigonometry. 

8266 Mathematics Skills 4 

Reviews arithmetic operations of whole numbers, fractions, and 
decimals, mathematics study skills, and verbal applications. 

8269 Intermediate Mathematics Skills 4 

Reviews ratio, proportion, percent conversions, percentage equa- 
tion, verbal applications, and measurement. 

8272 Mathematics Skills Development 4 

Allows student to follow an individualized education plan (IEP) in 
the development of pre-mathematics and basic mathematics skills. 

9305 Technical Mathematics for Health Occupations 5 

Offers basic instruction in technical mathematics for students in 
health occupations. Includes review of arithmetic, basic concepts 
of algebra, graphing geometry, and logarithms. 

9310 Pharmacology 6 

Introduces the student to the art and science of meeting biological, 
psychological, and sociological aspects of man through administra- 
tion of pharmacologic agents within the preventative, therapeutic 
and rehabilitative environment. It includes the responsibilities of the 
Licensed Practical Nurse in the administration of pharmacologic 
agents. It uses the nursing process to determine patient status on 
the wellness/illness continuum. 

9322 Biophysics for the Health Occupations 2 

Studies Basic concepts of physics and their applications in the 
health field. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and practical 
applications of theoretical material. 

9350 Medical Law and Ethics 2 

Studies the ethics of medicine and medical practice, with attention 
to the legal requirements and implications for professional and 
medical practices and personnel. 

9353 Anatomy and Physiology 1 4 

Presents structure and function of man; it systematically examines 
the physical and chemical factors that enable man to interact with 
his environment. Fundamental wellness/illness relationships are 
integrated. 



9356 Disease Conditions 3 

Presents basic concepts concerning disease, its causes, and the 
resulting changes in body functions. Emphasis is placed on func- 
tional disturbances and the correlation of patient symptoms with 
emergency and in-patient treatment. 

9358 Pharmacology 3 

Introduces the principles of pharmacology. Studies classifications 
of drugs, dosages, interactions, and incompatabilities. Covers drug 
administration, weights and measurements, and methods of prepara- 
tion, with attention to legal aspects and special precautions. 

9359 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 1 

Develops proficiency in mouth-to-mouth, mouth-to-nose, and mouth- 
to-stoma breathing. 

9411 Mechanical Drawing 1 3 

The fundamentals of drafting, including interpretation of lines, view 
positions, conventions and standard signs, symbols and abbrevia- 
tions, use of instruments, simple geometric constructions, 
orthographic projections, scaling and dimensioning are introduced. 

9441 Shop Mathematics 4 3 

Studies geometrical terms, axioms, theorems, and propositions per- 
taining to straight lines, triangles, and circles. Emphasis is placed 
on practical applications to shop problems. 

9413 Building Trades Blueprint Reading 3 

This course is designed to provide basic skills in residential building 
prints. All signs, symbols, scales, dimensions and abbreviations will 
be interpreted and converted to useful information. 

9472 Computer Programming for Technicians 3 

This course is an introduction to the architecture of a modern com- 
puter with emphasis on hardware and various software. Terminology 
is stressed. The hands-on approach is taken. 

9524 C Programming 5 

Provides a working knowledge of C Programming language and its 
applications to business data processing. C is a powerful, general 
purpose, structured language designed originally to run on com- 
puters utilizing the UNIX operating system. Lab assignments include 
coding, debugging and testing C language programs. 

9525 UNIX V Operating System Fundamentals 3 

Studies the UNIX Operating System and its use as a powerful time- 
sharing system. Includes basic UNIX commands, use of the visual 
editor, the UNIX directory structure and file management with SHELL 
commands. Offers opportunities to apply skills and knowledge in 
a laboratory situation. 



9354 Anatomy and Physiology 2 4 

Presents structure and function of man; it systematically examines 
the physical and chemical factors that enable man to interact with 
his environment. Fundamental wellness/illness relationships are 
integrated. 

9355 Medical Terminology 2 

Presents basic terminology required of all paraprofessionals in the 
health occupations. Also includes terminology specific to the stu- 
dent's area of specialization. 



86 



PROGRAM LOCATOR CHART 





1 2 3 


4 


Ivy Tech Region 

5 6 7 8 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 


DIVISION OF BUSINESS, OFFICE AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES 


Accounting 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Information/Data Management 




X 


X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X* 


Computer Programming 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Distribution Management 
















X 












Hotel/Motel Management 
















X 












Statistical Process Quality Control 






X 




X 


X 


X 


X 




X 








Industrial Supervision 




X 


X 


X 




X 




X 








X 




Marketing 


X 




X 




X 


X 


X 


X 








X 




Paralegal 
















X 












Quality Control 
















X 












Secretarial Sciences/Word Processing 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Small Business Operations Mgmt. 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


DIVISION OF VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES 
















"Courses only 


Audio Visual Communications 




X 
























Commercial & Industrial Photography 




X 










X 






X 




X 


X 


Commercial Art 




X 
















X 




X 


X 


Interior Design 




X 






X 














X 




Library Resource Aide 




























Printing 














X 














DIVISION OF HUMAN SERVICES AND HEALTH TECHNOLOGIES 


Child Care 






X 


X 




X 




X 












Culinary Arts 


X 




X 










X 












Dental Assistant 








X 




X 
















Dietary Manager 




X 


X 


X 




















Food Services 


















X 










Human Services 
















X 












Medical Assistant 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


Medical Laboratory Technician 




X 










X 














Mental Health Rehabilitation 






X 






X 
















Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) 




X 




X 










X 






X 




Practical Nursing 


X 


X 


X 


X 






X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Radiologic Technology 














X 


X 












Respiratory Therapy 


X 




X 


X 








X 












Surgical Technician 


X 






X 








X 








X 




DIVISION OF APPLIED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGIES 


Agricultural Equipment 








X 




















Applied Fire Science 


X 




X 


X 








X 












Architectural Drafting 




X 






X 




X 


X 




X 








Auto Body Repair 


X 






X 


X 


X 


X 


X 






X 




X 


Automated Manufacturing Technology 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Automotive Service 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Building Construction 






X 




X 


X 






X 








X 


Diesel Power 




X 




X 


















X 


Electronics Technology 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Heating, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


Industrial Drafting 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 






X 


Industrial Maintenance 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 






X 


X 


Machine Tool 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 








X 


Plastics Manufacturing 




X 
























Pollution Treatment 


X 


























Surface Mining Operation 














X 














Welding Technology 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 


Industrial Lab Technology 














X 


X 












Statistical Process Quality Control 














X 










X 





87 



Full-Time Faculty 



Applied Science and Technologies 

Duane Alfrey, Instructor (Welding Technology). 
Certification: American Welding Society. 

Michael Baker, Instructor (Auto Body Technol- 
ogy). Certification: Automotive Service Excel- 
lence. 

Arthur Bensheimer, Instructor (Chairperson, 
Automotive Service Technology). B.S., Indiana 
State University . 

Huey Calvain, Senior Instructor (Program 
Coordinator, Welding Technology). Certifica- 
tion NOTCI (National Occupational Testing 
Competency Institute), and American Welding 
Society. 

Michael DeBourbon, Master Instructor (Depart- 
ment Chairperson, Manufacturing Technolo- 
gies). B.S., Southern Illinois University; M.S., 
Indiana University . 

James G. Feller, Instructor (Automotive Service 
Technology). B.S., Indiana State University . 

William T. Flanigan, Instructor (Chairperson, 
Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration 
Technology Program). B.S., Tri-State Univer- 
sity . 

Janet Foster, Assistant Instructor (Architectural 
Drafting Technology). A.A.S., Indiana Voca- 
tional Technical College . 

Charlene Givens, Instructor (Chairperson, 
Pollution Treatment Technology and Industrial 
Maintenance). B.A., Indiana University. 

Michael Hall, Instructor (Chairperson, Auto- 
mated Manufacturing Technology). B.S., 
Purdue University; M.S., Purdue University. 



James Holder, Instructor (Applied Science and 
Technology). B.A., Indiana University. 

Larry E. Hoskins, Instructor (Chairperson, 
Applied Fire Science). B.S., Southern Illinois 
University; A.A.S., Indiana Vocational Techni- 
cal College. 

Robert Howell, Master Instructor (Department 
Chairperson, Technical Services Department). 
B.S., Purdue University . 

Kenneth King, Master Instructor (Chairperson, 
Industrial Laboratory Technology). A.B., 
Indiana University; M.S., Indiana University- 
Purdue University at Indianapolis; Certificate in 
Meteorology, St. Louis University . 

Stephen Kuchler, Senior Instructor (Electronics 
Technology). B.S., Purdue University . 

James McFarland, Master Instructor (Chairper- 
son, Architectural and Industrial Drafting 
Technology). B.S., Indiana State University. 

Edward Mackell, Master Instructor (Program 
Coordinator, Machine Tool Technology). 
A.A.S., Indiana Vocational Technical College. 

David E. Miller, Master Instructor (Electronics 
Technology). B.S., Purdue University; M.S., 
Indiana University. 

Ishman Moorman, Instructor (Industrial Mainte- 
nance Technology). A.A.S., Purdue University; 
B.S., Purdue University . 

Jon Myntti, Senior Instructor (Electronics 
Technology). B.S., North Dakota State Univer- 
sity ; M.S., North Dakota State University . 

James Pettit, Instructor (Heating, Air Condi- 
tioning and Refrigeration Technology). 

Haazim Sabree, Instructor (Applied Science and 
Technology). B.S., Florida A&M University. 



88 



Owen Sensenbrenner, Instructor (Industrial 
Maintenance). B.A., Indiana State University; 
M.S., Indiana State University. 

John M. Sollman, Master Instructor (Divisional 
Chairperson, Applied Science and Technolo- 
gies). B.S., Ball State University; M.A., Ball 
State University. 

Norman Tunison, Senior Instructor (Program 
Coordinator, Automotive Body Repair Technol- 
ogy). Certification: Automotive Service Excel- 
lence and Inter-industry Conference on Auto 
Collision Repair. 

Division of Business, Office and Information 
Systems Technologies 

Sakinah Abdulbaaquee, Instructor/Counselor. 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University. 

Russell E. Bankert, Master Instructor (Depart- 
ment Chairperson, Management Services). B.S., 
Illinois State University. 

Jeff Baron, Instructor (Business and Manage- 
ment). B.A., Indiana University-Purdue Univer- 
sity at Indianapolis. 

James Beeler, Master Instructor (Business and 
Management). A.B., Indiana University; M.S., 
Butler University. 

Bernadette Cinkoske, Instructor (Computer 
Programming Technology). B.A., Indiana 
University. 

Marvin L. Daugherty, Master Instructor (Chair- 
person, Computer Programming Technology). 
A.A.S., Indiana Vocational Technical College ; 
B.S., Martin Center College. 

Sue Easterday, Instructor (Chairperson, Infor- 
mation/Data Management). B.S., Miami Univer- 
sity at Oxford. 

Jennifer Graham, Instructor (Chairperson, 
Paralegal Technology). J.D., Indiana University 
School of Law; B.B.A., Walsh College. 



Harry E. Gray, CPA, Instructor (Accounting 
Technology). B.S., Butler University. 

William L. Greathouse, Instructor (Chairperson, 
Hotel/Restaurant Management and Culinary 
Arts). B.S., Purdue University; A.A.S., Purdue 
University; Certification: Front Office Execu- 
tive; Rooms Division Executive . 

Joanna Head, Instructor (Secretarial Sciences). 
B.S., Butler University; M.S., Butler University. 

Charles Highbaugh, Instructor (Chairperson, 
Quality Control and Industrial Supervision). 
B.S., Indiana State University. 

Debra Leverette, (Chairperson, Secretarial 
Sciences). B.S., Ball State University; M.S., 
Indiana University. 

Susan Mannan, Master Instructor (Chairperson, 
Library Resource Aide Program, and Coordina- 
tor, Learning Resource Center). B.A., Hei- 
delberg College; M.S., Indiana University . 

Alan Rowland, Instructor (Information/Data 
Management). B.S., Ball State University. 

Linda L. Scott, Senior Instructor (Department 
Chairperson, of Administrative Services). 
A.A.S., Ball State University; B.S., Ball State 
University; M.A., Ball State University. 

Jan Strietelmeier, Instructor (Computer Pro- 
gramming Technology). A.S., Indiana Central 
University; B.S., Indiana Central University. 

Vivian Terry, Instructor (Culinary Arts). B.S., 
Alcorn State University; Culinary Apprentice- 
ship, Delgado Community College. 

Deanna S. Timmons, Master Instructor (Divi- 
sional Chairperson, Business, Office and 
Information Systems Technologies). B.S., 
University of Indianapolis; M.S., Butler Uni- 
versity. 



89 



Human Services and Health Technologies 

Diana Bennett, Instructor (Chairperson, Medi- 
cal Assistant). B.S.N., DePauw University; 
M.S., DePauw University. 

Kathleen Bogren, Instructor (Practical Nursing) 
at Methodist Hospital. B.S., Wayne State Uni- 
versity . 

Sheila Cagle, Senior Instructor (Practical Nurs- 
ing). B.S.N., Indiana Central University; 
A.S.N., Indiana Central University; M.S.N., 
Indiana University. 

Verna Coons, Master Instructor (Chairperson, 
Practical Nursing). B.S.N., Indiana University; 
M.S.N., Indiana State University. 

Barbara Deady, Master Instructor (Practical 
Nursing) at St. Vincent's Hospital. B.S., Indiana 
State University. 

Florence Elmore, Master Instructor (Chairper- 
son, Surgical Technology). B.S., Indiana 
University -Purdue University at Indianapolis; 
M.S., Indiana University. 

Ann Hill, Instructor (Practical Nursing). B.S., 
St. Louis University. 

Kay Kavanagh, Master Instructor (Department 
Chairperson, Health Services). B.A., Marion 
College ; M.S., Indiana University. 

Margaret Kiessling, Instructor (Practical Nurs- 
ing ). A.S.N., Medaille College; B.S.N.,LaRo- 
che College . 

Kathleen Lee, Senior Instructor (Clinical Coor- 
dinator, Respiratory Therapy Technology). 
A.A.S., Indiana University; B.S., Muskingun 
College; M.S., Indiana University . 

Dr. Mary Ann Lewis, (Practical Nursing). 
D.N.S., Indiana University; B.S.N., Marillac 
College; M.S., Butler University. 



Peter Magnant, Master Instructor (Divisional 
Chairperson, Human Services and Health 
Technologies). A.A., Nursing, Indiana Univer- 
sity; B.A., St. Mary's College; B.S., Indiana 
University; M.S., Indiana University. 

Gayle Morrison, Instructor (Practical Nursing). 
B.S.N., Indiana University. 

Kathi Niccum, Senior Instructor (Department 
Chairperson, Human Services Technology). 
B.A., Indiana State University; M.S., Indiana 
State University. 

James Ohalla, Senior Instructor (Chairperson, 
Respiratory Therapy Technology). B.S., Geor- 
gia State University; M.S., Indiana University. 

Beverly Parham, Senior Instructor (Practical 
Nursing) at St. Francis Hospital. B.S., Okla- 
homa State University; M.S., Indiana Univer- 
sity. 

Teresa Jablonski-Polk, Instructor (Program 
Chairperson, Human Services). B.A., University 
of Kentucky; B.A., Washington University. 

Andrea Redford, Instructor (Human Services 
Technology). B.S., Ball State University ; 
M.A., Ball State University. 

Linda Reed, Instructor (Medical Assisting 
Program). Diploma, Marion County General 
Hospital School of Nursing, ; B.S., Indiana 
University. 

Kathleen Sheffler, (Developmental Faculty). 
B.S., University of Wyoming ; A.D.N., South- 
ern Illinois University. 

Sharon Sullivan, Instructor (Program Chairper- 
son, Child Care Technology). B.S., Western 
College; M.A., Ball State University. 

Jane Wallace, Senior Instructor (Practical 
Nursing) at Community Hospital. B.S., Ball 
State University . 



90 



Miles Wyatt, (Chairperson, Radiologic Technol- 
ogy). A.S., Indiana University; B.S., Indiana 
University. 

Instructional Support Services 

Rebecca Anderson, Instructor (Resource Cen- 
ter). B.S., Ball State University. 

Connie Bolinger, Senior Instructor (Coordina- 
tor, Mathematics/Science). MAT Mathematics. 
Purdue; B.A., DePauw University. 

Lee Churchill, Master Instructor (Communica- 
tions/Developmental). B.A., Indiana Univer- 
sity; M.S., University Wisconsin; M.A., 
University Wisconsin. 

Michael Clippinger, Master Instructor (Chair- 
person, Instructional Support Services Divi- 
sion). M.A., Indiana University ; Certified 
Specialist in Developmental Education, Appala- 
chian State University. 

Michael Gorsline, Instructor (Mathematics/ 
Developmental). B.A., Indiana University 
(South Bend); M.A., Ball State University. 

Marilyn Hamilton, Instructor (Mathematics/ 
Developmental). B.S., Purdue University; M.S., 
Butler University. 

Addison Howe, Instructor (Communications/ 
Developmental). B.A., University of Massachu- 
setts; M.A., Indiana University. 

Nancy Hubart-Lowe, Senior Instructor (Coordi- 
nator, Communications and Social Science). 
B.S., Indiana University; M.S., Indiana Univer- 
sity. 

Ali Lotfi, Instructor (Coordinator, Computer 
Assisted Instruction). B.A., Tehran University; 
M.S., Indiana University. 



Susan Miller, Instructor (Developmental). B.S., 
Indiana University; M.S., Indiana University. 

Cindy Morgan, Instructor and Counselor (Com- 
munications/Developmental). B.A., Indiana 
University; M.A., Indiana University. 

Gary Phillips, Instructor (Communications) 
B.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.A., 
Southern Illinois University; Ph.D., Southern 
Illinois University. 

Jan Strandjord, Instructor (Learning Develop- 
ment). B.A., University of Illinois; M.S., 
Indiana University. 

Margaret Thomas, Instructor and Counselor 
(Developmental). B.S., Winthrop College. 

Pat Thornburgh, Assistant Instructor (Mathe- 
matics/Developmental). A.S., Indiana Univer- 
sity . 

Kathy Ward, Instructor (Mathematics/Develop- 
mental). B.A., Molloy College; M.A., State 
University of New York. 

Christopher Wood, Master Instructor (Assistant 
Skills Advancement Coordinator). B.A., Indi- 
ana University; M.A., Indiana University. 



91 



Administration 



State Board of Trustees 

Donald H. Heckard, Chairperson 

Casper J. Alessi, Jr. 

Nancy C. Beaver 

Gilbert E. Betulius 

Jess F. Helsel 

Robert A. Holt 

V. William Hunt, Secretary 

Vernon Hux 

R. James Miller 

Marsha M. Oliver 

Robert E. Schumann, Vice-Chairperson 

Mrs. Philip T. Warner 

Mrs. Shirley Woody 



Regional Trustees 

John Ober, Chairperson 

Michael Barth, Jr. 

Moses W. Gray, Secretary 

Joseph R. McGeehan 

William A. Sigman 

Clara Thompson, Vice-Chairperson 

D. Edward Yates 



College Administrative Officers 



Gerald I. Lamkin 

President 



College Central Office 

Thomas H. Taylor 

Vice President/Treasurer 
College Central Office 

Dr. Norman W. Sieved 

Vice President/Educational Services 
College Central Office 

Charles W. Harris 

Vice President/Development 
College Central Office 

Dr. William Kramer 

Vice-President/Planning & Administrative Operations 

Mearle R. Donica 

Vice President/Dean 
Region 1 - Northwest 

Dr. Carl F. Lutz 

Vice President/Dean 
Region 2 - Northcentral 

Jon L. Rupright 

Vice President/Dean 
Region 3 - Fort Wayne 

Dr. Thomas E. Reckard 

Vice President/Dean 
Region 4 - Lafayette 

Charles E. Hefley 

Vice President/Dean 
Region 5 - Kokomo 



Richard L. Davidson 

Vice President/Dean 
Region 6 - Eastcentral 

Samuel E. Borden 

Vice President/Dean 
Region 7 - Wabash Valley 

Dr. Meredith L. Carter 

Vice President/Dean 
Region 8 - Central Indiana 

Dr. Judith Redwine 

Vice President/Dean 
Region 9 - Whitewater 

James R. Wells 

Executive Dean 
Region 10 - Columbus 

Gregory K. Flood 

Executive Dean 
Region 11 - Southeast 

Dr. H. Victor Baldi 

Vice President/Dean 
Region 12 - Southwest 

Johnathan Thomas 

Executive Dean 
Region 13 - Southcentral 

Homer B. Smith 

District Vice President 
Regions 10, 11, 13 



Central Indiana Region - Administrative Staff 



Dr. Meredith L. Carter 

Vice-President/Dean 



Dr. Thomas Cooke 

Dean of Instructional Affairs 

Darrell Cousert 

Director of Student Services 

Merrill Kissick 

Director of Strengthening Management Project 

Brian Leistner 

Director of Business Affairs 



Joan Roe 

Director of Employee Relations 

Austell Sherard 

Director of Outreach Programs 

Rex Ward 

Director of Industrial Training and Development 

Frank Yacone 

Director of Facilities 



92 



Ivy Tech 

Indiana's Technical College 



Region 1-Northwest 

Gary Center 
1440 East 35th Street 
Gary, Indiana 46409 
Phone:(219)981-111 

Region 2- Northcentral 
Regional Center 
1534 West Sample Street 
South Bend, Indiana 46619 
Phone: (219) 289-7001 

Region 3- Northeast 
Regional Center 
3800 N. Anthony Blvd. 
Fort Wayne, Indiana 46805 
Phone: (219) 482-9171 

Region 4- Lafayette 

Regional Center 
3208 Ross Road 
Lafayette, Indiana 47903 
Phone: (317) 477-7401 

Region 5- Kokomo 
Regional Center 
1815 East Morgan Street 
Kokomo, Indiana 46901 
Phone:(317)459-0561 



Region 6- Eastcentral 
Regional Center 
4100 Cowan Road 
Muncie, Indiana 47302 
Phone: (317) 289-2291 

Region 7- Wabash Valley 

Regional Center 
7373 Dixie Bee Road 
Terre Haute, Indiana 47802 
Phone:(812)299-1121 

Region 8- Central Indiana 

Regional Center 
North Meridian Center 
One West 26th Street 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46208 
Phone: (317) 921-4800 

Region 9- Whitewater 

Regional Center 
2325 Chester Blvd. 
Richmond, Indiana 47374 
Phone:(317)966-2656 



Region 10- Columbus/ 
Bloomington 

Regional Center 
4475 Central Avenue 
Columbus, Indiana 47203 
Phone: (812) 372-9925 
Indiana Residents: 
1-800-922-4838 
Bloomington Center 
Phone: (812) 332-1559 

Region 11- Southeast 

Regional Center 
Highway 62 and 
Ivy Tech Drive 
Madison, Indiana 47250 
Phone:(812)265-2580 

Region 12- Southwest 

Regional Center 
3501 First Avenue 
Evansville, Indiana 47710 
Phone:(812)426-2865 

Region 13- Southcentral 

Regional Center 
8204 Highway 311 
Sellersburg, Indiana 47172 
Phone:(812)246-3301 



JVYIECH 



Indiana Vocational Technical College 

One West 26th Street 

Indianapolis, Indiana 46208 

(317)921-4800